Profile

Cover photo
Jason N. Miller (JNM)
Attended Loyola University Chicago
56,601 followers
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm thinking a few people are setting their hopes a bit too high.


Microsoft partnership with open-source, Android-based Cyanogen OS makes one thing very clear: Android’s not just for Google anymore.
3
Tony Allen (crateon)'s profile photoScott Tisoy Leavitt (Tisoy)'s profile photo
2 comments
 
The comments in the article were very funny to read also. One said that Microsoft products are open source because they are available in the Play Store.
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Learn something and/or have a laugh!
Ayoub Khote originally shared:
 
How Cell Phones Work (By a Non-Engineer)

Ignoring the spelling mistakes, this is pretty funny, and semi accurate, metaphorically speaking :P

Via http://clk.ie/YNmG5C
4 comments on original post
3
James H.'s profile photo
 
WOW
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
I LOVE having battery left at the end of every single day to listen to music, browse, or do whatever the hell I want, rather than needing to immediately charge the phone. Thanks +Sony Xperia​!


52
1
Manish Yadav's profile photoDarek Z's profile photoWanns Peter's profile photoRichard Hawkins's profile photo
9 comments
 
I hate the look of the navigation buttons
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
One of my favorite Reddit stories: 
There were a lot of things we couldn't do in an SR-71, but we were the fastest guys on the block and loved reminding our fellow aviators of this fact. People often asked us if, because of this fact, it was fun to fly the jet. Fun would not be the first word I would use to describe flying this plane. Intense, maybe. Even cerebral. But there was one day in our Sled experience when we would have to say that it was pure fun to be the fastest guys out there, at least for a moment.
It occurred when Walt and I were flying our final training sortie. We needed 100 hours in the jet to complete our training and attain
Mission Ready status. Somewhere over Colorado we had passed the century mark. We had made the turn in Arizona and the jet was performing flawlessly. My gauges were wired in the front seat and we were starting to feel pretty good about ourselves, not only because we would soon be flying real missions but because we had gained a great deal of confidence in the plane in the past ten months. Ripping across the barren deserts 80,000 feet below us, I could already see the coast of California from the Arizona border. I was, finally, after many humbling months of simulators and study, ahead of the jet.
I was beginning to feel a bit sorry for Walter in the back seat. There he was, with no really good view of the incredible sights before us, tasked with monitoring four different radios. This was good practice for him for when we began flying real missions, when a priority transmission from headquarters could be vital. It had been difficult, too, for me to relinquish control of the radios, as during my entire flying career I had controlled my own transmissions. But it was part of the division of duties in this plane and I had adjusted to it. I still insisted on talking on the radio while we were on the ground, however. Walt was so good at many things, but he couldn't match my expertise at sounding smooth on the radios, a skill that had been honed sharply with years in fighter squadrons where the slightest radio miscue was grounds for beheading. He understood that and allowed me that luxury.
Just to get a sense of what Walt had to contend with, I pulled the radio toggle switches and monitored the frequencies along with him. The predominant radio chatter was from Los Angeles Center, far below us, controlling daily traffic in their sector. While they had us on their scope (albeit briefly), we were in uncontrolled airspace and normally would not talk to them unless we needed to descend into their airspace.
We listened as the shaky voice of a lone Cessna pilot asked Center for a readout of his ground speed. Center replied: "November Charlie 175, I'm showing you at ninety knots on the ground."
Now the thing to understand about Center controllers, was that whether they were talking to a rookie pilot in a Cessna, or to Air Force One, they always spoke in the exact same, calm, deep, professional, tone that made one feel important. I referred to it as the " Houston Center voice." I have always felt that after years of seeing documentaries on this country's space program and listening to the calm and distinct voice of the Houston controllers, that all other controllers since then wanted to sound like that, and that they basically did. And it didn't matter what sector of the country we would be flying in, it always seemed like the same guy was talking. Over the years that tone of voice had become somewhat of a comforting sound to pilots everywhere. Conversely, over the years, pilots always wanted to ensure that, when transmitting, they sounded like Chuck Yeager, or at least like John Wayne. Better to die than sound bad on the radios.
Just moments after the Cessna's inquiry, a Twin Beech piped up on frequency, in a rather superior tone, asking for his ground speed. "I have you at one hundred and twenty-five knots of ground speed." Boy, I thought, the Beechcraft really must think he is dazzling his Cessna brethren. Then out of the blue, a navy F-18 pilot out of NAS Lemoore came up on frequency. You knew right away it was a Navy jock because he sounded very cool on the radios. "Center, Dusty 52 ground speed check". Before Center could reply, I'm thinking to myself, hey, Dusty 52 has a ground speed indicator in that million-dollar cockpit, so why is he asking Center for a readout? Then I got it, ol' Dusty here is making sure that every bug smasher from Mount Whitney to the Mojave knows what true speed is. He's the fastest dude in the valley today, and he just wants everyone to know how much fun he is having in his new Hornet. And the reply, always with that same, calm, voice, with more distinct alliteration than emotion: "Dusty 52, Center, we have you at 620 on the ground."
And I thought to myself, is this a ripe situation, or what? As my hand instinctively reached for the mic button, I had to remind myself that Walt was in control of the radios. Still, I thought, it must be done - in mere seconds we'll be out of the sector and the opportunity will be lost. That Hornet must die, and die now. I thought about all of our Sim training and how important it was that we developed well as a crew and knew that to jump in on the radios now would destroy the integrity of all that we had worked toward becoming. I was torn.
Somewhere, 13 miles above Arizona, there was a pilot screaming inside his space helmet. Then, I heard it. The click of the mic button from the back seat. That was the very moment that I knew Walter and I had become a crew. Very professionally, and with no emotion, Walter spoke: "Los Angeles Center, Aspen 20, can you give us a ground speed check?" There was no hesitation, and the replay came as if was an everyday request. "Aspen 20, I show you at one thousand eight hundred and forty-two knots, across the ground."
I think it was the forty-two knots that I liked the best, so accurate and proud was Center to deliver that information without hesitation, and you just knew he was smiling. But the precise point at which I knew that Walt and I were going to be really good friends for a long time was when he keyed the mic once again to say, in his most fighter-pilot-like voice: "Ah, Center, much thanks, we're showing closer to nineteen hundred on the money."
For a moment Walter was a god. And we finally heard a little crack in the armor of the Houston Center voice, when L.A.came back with, "Roger that Aspen, Your equipment is probably more accurate than ours. You boys have a good one."
It all had lasted for just moments, but in that short, memorable sprint across the southwest, the Navy had been flamed, all mortal airplanes on freq were forced to bow before the King of Speed, and more importantly, Walter and I had crossed the threshold of being a crew. A fine day's work. We never heard another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.
For just one day, it truly was fun being the fastest guys out there.
Credit goes to Brian Shul, from his book, Sled Driver
#reddit  #SR-71 via: bit.ly/1DnH4BU
1 comment on original post
10
4
Shane Klingonsmith's profile photoRyan Manning's profile photo
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is what Google+ looks like much if the time when I try to scroll through. Why?

It can't be my connection. That's for sure. 
2
Jason N. Miller (JNM)'s profile photoAjerico Brown's profile photoJames S. Young Jr.'s profile photoChandra Capers's profile photo
9 comments
 
http://dlvr.it/9846Xd this may or may not open, but let me know. It's an article that says the update will put pics one place and stream in another. If it does not open, go to my post and scroll down until you see Google article march 27 date.
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
56,601 people
Richard Scott's profile photo
Beta Lambda's profile photo
Jeff Stolhand's profile photo
OzBourne Reid (Oz The God)'s profile photo
dave g's profile photo
Daniela Becerra's profile photo
Michael Jaffurs's profile photo
Oliver Kwakele's profile photo
Robert Stuart's profile photo
 
+Google+Google Maps​, ​if I do not want to enable this feature, stop trying to force it. I could not leave this screen until pressing OK, which means I'm not being given a choice, and that does nothing more than piss me off. I get rid of products and services that piss me off.


2
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
I've criticized The Verge pretty harshly in the past, even pissing a few of you off in the process, but I can't say that I really care that much. They don't even bother to try to hide what I'll be nice and call preferences for one manufacturer over others.

This is a full-fledged commercial quality review of a product. I expected them to run full credits at the end of this review, and I'm not too far off in that expectation, as it appears. They threw a bunch of time and money into producing a video of something they reviewed, taking far more time, and making far more of an effort than is made for any similar product. They had multiple interviews with outside companies that have absolutely nothing to do with the device, within the review of that device, for no discernable reason.

Interestingly, almost all interviewed were attractive women. Well, that clears it up. Hope it worked out for ya!

They are disappointed with the Apple Watch's performance, it's looks, it's battery life, and what it does...then they call it the best.

Remember the square versus rectangle versus circular, argument over smart watch design? Since they made so big a deal of it last year I'd think it would be worth mentioning. They certainly had the time.

I'm on the verge of questioning the journalistic integrity of these guys. OK, I've crossed that bridge. They want to be journalists. They're trying hard to present themselves as just that. I see glimpses of it sometimes. But...then there is stuff like this. At least they've got money being tossed their way to make this happen. Gotta wonder who's doing the tossing though.



Derek Ross originally shared:
 
+The Verge gives the Apple Watch a score of 7

And here come the Apple Watch reviews. The Verge, often referred to iVerge by Android faithfuls, has given the Apple Watch a score of 7. However, throughout the review, Nilay Patel criticizes the Apple Watch again and again, yet still believes it's the best smartwatch that you can buy - even though his publication gave the Moto 360 a score of 8.1.

the Apple Watch, as I reviewed it for the past week and a half, is kind of slow. There’s no getting around it, no way to talk about all of its interface ideas and obvious potential and hints of genius without noting that sometimes it stutters loading notifications. Sometimes pulling location information and data from your iPhone over Bluetooth and WiFi takes a long time. Sometimes apps take forever to load, and sometimes third-party apps never really load at all. Sometimes it’s just unresponsive for a few seconds while it thinks and then it comes back.

Apple Watch with leather loop band weighs 2.9 ounces, which is more than my plastic Nixon’s 1.7 ounces or the 1.8-ounce Moto 360, but much less than my five-ounce Baume and Mercier. All in all, the Apple Watch isn’t light enough to fade away, but it’s also not so heavy that it’s a distraction.

the watch felt underpowered, I found that the screen lit up a couple of ticks too slowly: I’d raise my wrist, wait a beat, and then the screen would turn on. This sounds like a minor quibble, but in the context of a watch you’re glancing at dozens of times a day, it’s quickly distracting. Other smartwatches like the Pebble and the LG G Watch R simply leave their screens on all the time; having a screen that constantly flips on and off is definitely behind the curve.

Siri on the Watch suffers from the same performance-related issues as everything else that requires a data connection to your phone and can be a little slow to respond. It’s also extremely susceptible to background noise

it’s disappointing to see the Watch struggle with performance. What good is a watch that makes you wait? Rendering notifications can slow everything down to a crawl. Buttons can take a couple taps to register.
 
And I found that the heart rate sensor struggled during my workouts, especially when I was really sweaty; it consistently measured about half my correct heart rate instead of my full 148bpm.
 
By the end of each day, I was hyper-aware of how low the Apple Watch battery had gotten. After one particularly heavy day of use, I hit 10 percent battery at 7pm, triggering a wave of anxiety. But most days were actually fine. Apple had a big challenge getting a tiny computer like this to last a day, and it succeeded — even if that success seemingly comes at the expense of performance.

Even after all of the above, he still believes:
There’s no question that the Apple Watch is the most capable smartwatch available today.

This is a well written review. The Apple Watch is sure going to set a bar for the Wearable industry. And it seems that bar has been set pretty low.
The Apple Watch is Apple’s first entirely-new product in five years. I’ve been wearing one non-stop for a week trying to answer the question: is it worth buying?
103 comments on original post
8
1
Derek Ross's profile photoDavid Moralez's profile photoJason Bauman's profile photoNicole Fellouris's profile photo
3 comments
 
Just to interject here though: This is a product from one of the best known companies in the world, something that had a lot of "mainstream" press, and a lot of buzz.  People who had no idea what android wear (or pebble) were know of Apple's watch.  Most people I know with android wear are asked by people on the street if it's an "apple watch."

If you're going to go full out on production and try and make something new, this is the piece to do it on. Obviously there's other things at play here, but there are some real financial reasons to do this on THIS product and not others.  And it has nothing to do with where they get the money in that regard.

Their preferences play into it, sure.  But it's not all their preferences.
Add a comment...
 
Better in black and white? She hated the photo until I did this... Now loves it. 
5
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wouldn't mind being back here. Right now. 
5
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Smart-ass for life.


3
Kenny Parnell's profile photo
 
I sat on my college books. So I"M a Certified smart ass.

You can use that line if you want to.
Add a comment...

Jason N. Miller (JNM)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bought a Keurig in January, maybe the beginning of February. It died already. I had to make them exchange it for a newer one. Maybe this one will make it three months. I'd like to set a record. 
4
Jason N. Miller (JNM)'s profile photoScott Carpenter's profile photoKenny Parnell's profile photoKevin Wu's profile photo
5 comments
 
I consider the 2.0; but my 1.0 machine just won't die..!  that thing is bullet proof, but I do love my machine, and I take good care of it.. the only thing about the machine is it's larger footprint; & we have limited counter space, so I wheel it out Friday night for the weekend, and I get an instant smile brewing my weekend tea; and stow it away Monday morning... I look forward to using my machine every weekend ^_^
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
56,601 people
Richard Scott's profile photo
Beta Lambda's profile photo
Jeff Stolhand's profile photo
OzBourne Reid (Oz The God)'s profile photo
dave g's profile photo
Daniela Becerra's profile photo
Michael Jaffurs's profile photo
Oliver Kwakele's profile photo
Robert Stuart's profile photo
Education
  • Loyola University Chicago
  • University of Illinois at Chicago
Links
Other profiles
Story
Tagline
The best thing that ever happened to you...
Introduction
I love mobile technology. I love Formula One. I love (and am disgusted by) politics. You'll see me post on all of these topics and more here...
Basic Information
Gender
Male