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Jason Goldman
Works at Conservation Magazine
Attended University of Southern California
36,961 followers|2,214,676 views
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Jason Goldman

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Thrilled to be contributing to GOOD Magazine!
Ocean reefs around the globe are losing their luster—but scientists say there's hope
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Great info, and nice write-up.
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Jason Goldman

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Hi everyone! I'm putting together topics for the next set of explainers in my BBC Future column, "Body Matters." What burning questions do you have about human anatomy or physiology? Let me know and it just might become the topic for one of my articles!
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I'd like to know more about memory loss, but, I can't remember what it is specifically I'd like to know.
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Citizen science brings science education out of antiquity and into modernity.
At its best, citizen science is a means by which we continue to cast off the intellectual shackles of the Middle Ages.
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Meet the Brazilian torrent frog. It’s got the most sophisticated communications system we know of for any frog.
The Brazilian torrent frog has the most sophisticated visual communications system yet documented for a frog species.
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They said there were sea turtles in a river in Long Beach. I went to see them for myself.
It's only due to volunteer citizen scientists that we know what we do about the San Gabriel River's sea turtles.
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Also doing my bit for Citizen Science: joining a butterfly count in Singapore next month.
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Did you know that wolves have local variations in their howls, something like dialects or accents? My latest for Scientific American's 60-Second-Science podcast.
Understanding the regional vocal patterns of various canid species sheds light on animal communication and could help ranchers broadcast "keep away" messages to protect livestock.
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Jason Goldman

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My debut piece for Scientific American MIND
Both exertion and synchronicity play a role in the social effects of dance
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While I didn't meet my wife while dancing, we did bond together when I decided to take up dancing to know her better. Best decision of my life...};-)

BTW, I think dancing also helps to foster tolerance; you learn to tolerate your partner's mis-steps, to help each other get through tricky moves (especially in partner dances) and to adjust your steps to match your partners, especially when you change partners and you learn to dance with taller or shorter people with different ways of moving and holding.
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In the Canary Islands, whales have become maritime roadkill. 
The Canary Island’s sperm whales are (slowly) being wiped out by ship strikes.
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horrible!
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I went whale watching with some citizen scientists in Long Beach. Here's what I learned.
Citizen Science isn't all about casual observations. Some citizen scientists do hard-core data crunching, like those working with the Long Beach Aquarium to identify and locate wild whales.
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And if we could, seriously, what would we even use it for?
Animals are known to be able to navigate by taking advantage of the Earth’s magnetic fields. But do humans possess the same ability? And do we do so without even knowing?
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There are a few of us, in my own case, as a child, I trained myself to be aware of this sense by deliberately getting myself disoriented, and then try to predict the direction before I open my eyes. After a while I noticed a slight "pull" to the north somewhere in my head. Could be that I just trained myself to be hyper aware of my position and how many turns I made, but it has been very reliable. 
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It's been a while since i've posted here, but I seem to have a fair amount of followers and I don't want to ignore everyone! So, show of hands: do you want me to share more of my wildlife-related journalism and my wildlife photography?
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absolutely!
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They may appear as spots, small threads, filaments, or cobwebs and they’re not optical illusions. They’re really there, drifting about inside your eyes. 
Most of us have seen strange shapes floating in our vision from time to time. Jason G Goldman explains what they are…
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In his circles
1,031 people
Have him in circles
36,961 people
Evaneilton Ribeiro Flambory Pessoa's profile photo
Max Kalanov's profile photo
Chelsea  Rafols's profile photo
Aaron Copeland's profile photo
Joseph White's profile photo
Amy Harbison's profile photo
Rob Vettor's profile photo
Mth Haffar's profile photo
Linda Dee's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Scientist (Animal Cognition), Science Writer, Photographer
Employment
  • Conservation Magazine
    Freelance Writer, 2013 - present
  • Earth Touch
    Staff Writer, 2014 - present
  • BBC Future
    Freelance Writer, 2012 - present
  • Scientific American
    Freelance Writer, 2011 - present
  • University of Southern California
    Graduate Student, 2007 - 2013
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Single
Other names
jgold85
Story
Tagline
Scientist by day, science writer by night. I study the evolution of the mind. Scientist to the stars.
Introduction
Scientist by day, science writer by night. Areas: Cognitive neuroscience and animal cognition.

ScienceSeeker editor and Editor of Open Lab 2010. Photographer. Scientist to the stars.
Education
  • University of Southern California
    Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2013
  • University of Southern California
    M.A., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2009
  • University of Southern California