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Jason Goldman
Works at Conservation Magazine
Attended University of Southern California
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Jason Goldman

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Creepy.
Quick: what has a forty-two to forty-six creepy legs, can grow over twenty creepy centimetres long? The answer is Scolopendra heros, otherwise known as the Texas redheaded centipede!
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Yeah, we saw one that big when I was a teen at Boy Scout camp. One boy decided to play with it, poking it with a short stick. The centipede was wrapped around his arm before we knew it, digging in. It took two of us to pry it off, and he went to the medic's station, then the hospital for treatment.
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Here's my piece from last year - a handy reminder for US folks whose dogs will be surrounded by scary fireworks this weekend.
Dogs are terrified of fireworks. How can you enjoy the Fourth of July while also being sensitive to your canine companions' needs? We reached out to a group of dog scientists to get some answers. Here's what they had to say.
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Jason Goldman

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The typical rhetoric around invasive species tends to suggest a certain set of values: that native species are inherently more valuable than introduced ones. “I think this is a problem,” says Pienkowski. Instead, he prefers to think of habitats in which non-native species have gained a foothold as novel ecosystems.
Could invasive Australian crayfish be a good thing for Jamaica?
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The effect vary depending on the species that's doing the invading.  Ivy can wipe out the understory, and eventually kill trees. Buddleia attracts butterflies. It interesting that our local noxious weed board includes buddleia on its wanted list, but not ivy.
Tim Flannery's in The Eternal Frontier talks about several prior invasions by Eurasian species that completely changed the landscape of the continent. So this recent invasion is really nothing new
It was interesting that pre- European inhabitants of the Northwest practiced what might be best described as  managed ecosystems. They maintained the prairies (usually in or near wet areas) by burning them. Left alone these areas would have in time become forested. 
Essentially they favored the habitats that were the most beneficial, and selected for prairies where it was practical. They also weeded out things like the death camas. 
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Jason Goldman

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The syndrome is rather hilariously called ACHOO: Autosomal-Dominant Compelling Helio-Opthalmic Outburst.
If you find yourself sneezing when you come from the dark into the light, you’re not alone. Jason G Goldman investigates why this sudden syndrome strikes.
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The latest volley in the ongoing debate over the usefulness of an ecosystem services argument in biodiversity conservation. (By me at Conservation Magazine.)
Bees provide critical services to human society because they allow us to enjoy tasty fruits and nuts. So saving them is smart economics, right? Not so fast.
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Its interesting topic......we are reading this.....
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Get ready for Iron Chef: Gombe Stream National Park.
They're no Jamie Oliver, but give them the right sort of oven, and it turns out chimps are capable of cooking. So what does that suggest about our earliest human ancestors and their cookery skills?
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At the sanctuary? Yeah, but raw.
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Jason Goldman

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So a radio-collared mountain goat decided to take in some sun at +Glacier National Park ... on the visitor center roof!
Visitors to Glacier National Park in Montana were in for a surprise this week when a mountain goat decided to show off its climbing skills … on the roof of the park's visitor centre!
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Does it belt out "The Sound of Music"?
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How can we best safeguard the 4.5% of America that's still considered "wilderness"?
America's 109 million acres of wilderness are protected, but perhaps only minimally so. Could a model based upon UNESCO's biosphere reserves be better?
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Wow, great idea! But yes, money - there's the rub.
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Climate change drives away California’s stunning wildflowers.
California's wildflowers have declined over the past 15 years, and researchers have data that shows it can be linked to climate change.
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In my latest at +Earth Touch, find out why it's bad news that Africa's vultures are in decline.
A new report charts drastic declines for each one of Africa's eight vulture species. Is it time to declare that the continent is experiencing a vulture crisis?
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What do you do when you have 1.2 million images, mostly of plants but occasionally of wildlife? Let the public loose on classifying them!
225 camera traps are recording the movements of wildlife in more than 1000 square kilometers of the Serengeti, and the dataset is available to the public.
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This tiny little froglet is smaller than your thumbnail and if we're not careful it might lose its unique habitat.
After five years of fieldwork, researchers describe seven new species of tiny frogs from Brazil's cloud forests, but their habitats are being threatened.
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Have him in circles
37,091 people
Richard Thomas's profile photo
StormandShadow CrowandCoyote's profile photo
Bhagwat singh's profile photo
Jonathan Kamrava's profile photo
Justin  Zigbuo's profile photo
antonio alfaro's profile photo
Manuel Ocaña Palacios's profile photo
wilfred Densingh A's profile photo
Millicent Sonku's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Scientist (Animal Cognition), Science Writer, Photographer
Employment
  • Conservation Magazine
    Freelance Writer, 2013 - present
  • Earth Touch
    Staff Writer, 2014 - present
  • BBC Future
    Freelance Writer, 2012 - present
  • Scientific American
    Freelance Writer, 2011 - present
  • University of Southern California
    Graduate Student, 2007 - 2013
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Single
Other names
jgold85
Story
Tagline
Scientist by day, science writer by night. I study the evolution of the mind. Scientist to the stars.
Introduction
Scientist by day, science writer by night. Areas: Cognitive neuroscience and animal cognition.

ScienceSeeker editor and Editor of Open Lab 2010. Photographer. Scientist to the stars.
Education
  • University of Southern California
    Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2013
  • University of Southern California
    M.A., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2009
  • University of Southern California