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Jason Goldman
Works at Conservation Magazine
Attended University of Southern California
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Jason Goldman

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Want some non-lion news? By me at Conservation Magazine.
Many have long thought that a lake's blueness was related to water clarity, but new evidence reveals something different – and far more interesting.
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It look cool 
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When researchers have taken a close look at diseases at the wildlife-livestock interface, the focus has often been on the role of wildlife as a source for disease, perhaps owing to our own human bias favoring livestock while neglecting the inherent value in wildlife biodiversity... But the truth is that diseases pass between livestock and wildlife in both directions, both thanks to vectors like insects that move pathogens back and forth, but also because in many ecosystems, wildlife and livestock share resources like water and pastures.
Infectious diseases that pass between livestock and wildlife can impact not just their own welfare, but also human health and economics.
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Creepy.
Quick: what has a forty-two to forty-six creepy legs, can grow over twenty creepy centimetres long? The answer is Scolopendra heros, otherwise known as the Texas redheaded centipede!
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I've never seing some before
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Here's my piece from last year - a handy reminder for US folks whose dogs will be surrounded by scary fireworks this weekend.
Dogs are terrified of fireworks. How can you enjoy the Fourth of July while also being sensitive to your canine companions' needs? We reached out to a group of dog scientists to get some answers. Here's what they had to say.
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The typical rhetoric around invasive species tends to suggest a certain set of values: that native species are inherently more valuable than introduced ones. “I think this is a problem,” says Pienkowski. Instead, he prefers to think of habitats in which non-native species have gained a foothold as novel ecosystems.
Could invasive Australian crayfish be a good thing for Jamaica?
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The effect vary depending on the species that's doing the invading.  Ivy can wipe out the understory, and eventually kill trees. Buddleia attracts butterflies. It interesting that our local noxious weed board includes buddleia on its wanted list, but not ivy.
Tim Flannery's in The Eternal Frontier talks about several prior invasions by Eurasian species that completely changed the landscape of the continent. So this recent invasion is really nothing new
It was interesting that pre- European inhabitants of the Northwest practiced what might be best described as  managed ecosystems. They maintained the prairies (usually in or near wet areas) by burning them. Left alone these areas would have in time become forested. 
Essentially they favored the habitats that were the most beneficial, and selected for prairies where it was practical. They also weeded out things like the death camas. 
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The syndrome is rather hilariously called ACHOO: Autosomal-Dominant Compelling Helio-Opthalmic Outburst.
If you find yourself sneezing when you come from the dark into the light, you’re not alone. Jason G Goldman investigates why this sudden syndrome strikes.
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Nalin Ranjan‎British Neuroscience Association

           Global Brain Drain on Health
                                                        Date 15-7-2015
From
A.Nalin Ranjan, Scientist

To
British Neuroscience Association

Sub:- Why prolong sitting causes deadly diseases?
Sir,
Again, I am surprise to see an article titled as “Sitting for long may up cancer risk in women” appeared in ‘The Times of India’ dated 15-7-2015 that they have analyzed and being stated “Spending more leisure time sitting is associated with a higher risk of multiple myeloma, breast cancer and ovarian cancer in women, a new Large-scale study led by an Indian-origin scientist has found. The study, however, found no association between sitting time and cancer risk in men. While extensive research links physical activity to cancer prevention few studies have examined the link between sitting time and the risk of specific cancer.
For the study, researchers led by Alpa Patel from American Cancer Society, compared leisure time sitting to cancer risk among over 146,000 men and women (69,260 men and 77,462 women) who were cancer –free and enrolled in the American Cancer Society Cancer prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Between 1992 and 2009, 18,555 men and 12,236 women were diagnosed with cancer.

With regard to this, I would like to say something more ‘why cancer occurs in some people’. Basically people are not giving importance for their brain invariantly brain is being put to hardship due to lack of oxygen supply.

While sitting on the chair as well as on the sofa you are bound to rest for a longer time is the cause for such deadly diseases. It is purely because the blood is not flowing freely for the head region is the cause for all types of cancer and other deadly diseases like kidney failure, coronary artery disease, backache and diabetes and so on. But people who sits perpendicular to the floor they stretch their legs now and then and sometimes they fold their legs in different angles and while getting up also the posture of their bowing head goes below the heart level. This way it eases the heart to pump more blood for the head region. Further, to raise the body upright they apply pressure on the two hands with strength of the two legs they are able to stand. From sitting posture to standing posture it activates all the brain cells to the utmost level that avoids most of the disease in the human. But this kind of stimulation is not found for those who leisurely sit on the chair as well as on the sofa lead to all kinds of diseases.

Why this is happening for people who sit on the chair?

When you are sitting on the chair your back body takes full advantage of resting on the back portion of the chair. Since, prolong sitting your spinal cord unknowingly undergoes this physiological stress. To compensate this, the brain automatically send more blood to ease the spine in the process it adds more weight in the pouch area (increasing the Body Mass Index) thus lessening the blood flow for the head region. This is because spinal cord suffers with the added weight in the stomach in supporting the body weight which is caused by leisurely sitting on the chair. In order to compensate this it releases cortisol and epinephrine hormones that lead to all kinds of diseases. For more details refer my blog website titled as “Global Brain Drain on Doctors’ Health” also refer the report in the Blog titled as “How the prehistoric human evolution had taken place on Earth- Part II” dated 3-12-2014 tells why this pre-historic humans were strong and healthy than the Modern Man’s brain.

Let this beauty speaks itself in life.

By
A. Nalin Ranjan
Brain Research Work
Copy of this report posted to "Dr. Phillip Plait, Scientist" on 13-7-2015
Copy of this report posted to "Web-MD" on 14-7-2015
Copy of this report posted to " The Economic Times" on 14-7-2015
Copy of this report posted to "Internation Women's Day" displayed in You Tube
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Have him in circles
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Jason Goldman

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If eggs are too close to the water, they could drown, especially in high tides. Developing turtle embryos need to exchange gases with the outside world through their shells. That is, they need to breathe. If the eggs are immersed in water for too long, they might not be able to breathe as efficiently, and that could reduce their chances of survival. Field observations suggest that inundation can reduce egg viability, but nobody knows at what point inundation overwhelms the developing turtle. Is just a few minutes enough? Can the embryos survive a few hours underwater? What about a few hours every day?
Sea turtles nest far enough from shore to avoid inundation but close enough for hatchlings to safely return to the sea. How do rising seas complicate that?
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A fungal infection is killing snakes in the eastern US and nobody really knows all that much about it.
Herpetologists have become concerned over a fungal infection that's been spreading through American snake populations.
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To bad
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So a radio-collared mountain goat decided to take in some sun at +Glacier National Park ... on the visitor center roof!
Visitors to Glacier National Park in Montana were in for a surprise this week when a mountain goat decided to show off its climbing skills … on the roof of the park's visitor centre!
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Does it belt out "The Sound of Music"?
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How can we best safeguard the 4.5% of America that's still considered "wilderness"?
America's 109 million acres of wilderness are protected, but perhaps only minimally so. Could a model based upon UNESCO's biosphere reserves be better?
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Wow, great idea! But yes, money - there's the rub.
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Climate change drives away California’s stunning wildflowers.
California's wildflowers have declined over the past 15 years, and researchers have data that shows it can be linked to climate change.
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In my latest at +Earth Touch, find out why it's bad news that Africa's vultures are in decline.
A new report charts drastic declines for each one of Africa's eight vulture species. Is it time to declare that the continent is experiencing a vulture crisis?
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Have him in circles
37,153 people
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Work
Occupation
Scientist (Animal Cognition), Science Writer, Photographer
Employment
  • Conservation Magazine
    Freelance Writer, 2013 - present
  • Earth Touch
    Staff Writer, 2014 - present
  • BBC Future
    Freelance Writer, 2012 - present
  • Scientific American
    Freelance Writer, 2011 - present
  • University of Southern California
    Graduate Student, 2007 - 2013
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Gender
Male
Relationship
Single
Other names
jgold85
Story
Tagline
Scientist by day, science writer by night. I study the evolution of the mind. Scientist to the stars.
Introduction
Scientist by day, science writer by night. Areas: Cognitive neuroscience and animal cognition.

ScienceSeeker editor and Editor of Open Lab 2010. Photographer. Scientist to the stars.
Education
  • University of Southern California
    Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2013
  • University of Southern California
    M.A., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2009
  • University of Southern California