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Jason Goldman
Works at Scientific American
Attended University of Southern California
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Jason Goldman

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Penises. Dinosaurs. Pluto. This post has everything!
Just what counts as a penis? A debate over what to call the genitals of an unusual group of cave insects has broader implications, because it gets right at the heart of science and science communication: what's the relationship between the labels we use in science and the way those labels are understood by our culture?
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+Jason Goldman it doesn't have everything...It's missing bacon, beer and/or scotch, bewbs, laser guided high velocity bb guns and Star Wars.
But it's still pretty cool.
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Arne O. Mooers, a Simon Fraser University biologist who oversaw the study, said in a statement, “[We] found that if we prioritize threatened birds by their distinctness, we actually preserve very close to the maximum possible amount of evolution…This means our method can identify those species we cannot afford to lose and it can be used to preserve the information content represented by all species into the future. Both are major goals for conservation biology.”
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"She found that adolescents who had animal experience were more likely to see themselves as important contributors to their communities, such as taking on leadership roles in organizations, or doing community service."
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Here's the thing about euthanizing animals in pet shelters: nobody wants to do it. It's simply a consequence of an imbalance between supply and demand. More unwanted animals wind up in increasingly overcrowded shelters than are adopted out.
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Could golf courses actually boost conservation?

There are 18,300 golf courses in the United States, encompassing some 2.7 million acres. University of Missouri, Colombia biologist Mark J. Mackey put it this way: “golf has become an appreciable portion of land use in the United States.” In a new paper recently published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning, Mackey and colleagues explain that understanding the impact of intensively groomed golf courses on the surrounding ecology isn’t as simple as “good” or “bad.” Instead, they argue that studies of golf course ecology should focus on particular target organisms, the so-called canaries in the golf course coal mine, whose responses to the altered ecology might help researchers to better understand the impacts of golf landscaping more broadly.
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Because everyone needs a little biomechanics in their day.
Red pandas and giant pandas have more in common than simply being equally adorable and included on the IUCN Red List. They both eat bamboo and live in the same habitats. How do they coexist without competing over the same resources? The secret might be hidden in their skulls.
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Poor P-22...
The mountain lion mascot of Los Angeles, Griffith Park's P-22, is sick. And it's all our fault.
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pfff :-(
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It's a first in the animal kingdom. Among a group of cave-dwelling Brazilian insects, the females use a specialized sex organ to penetrate the males. Scientists say that their lives challenge everything we thought we knew about sexual selection.
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It's like science is trolling the bible freaks...
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And what does it tell us about how dinosaurs slept?
Do you think its dogs? Dogs sleep a lot. Guess again. What about cats? Not them either. It isn't a primate, so that rules out humans, apes, and monkeys.
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Sea otters can get the flu.
Remember the H1N1 flu that spread across the planet in 2009? It was the same flu strain that was predominant during this winter's flu season. Now it's turned up in sea otters living off the coast of Washington state, and researchers don't know how it got there.
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What??
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In his circles
1,025 people
Have him in circles
30,839 people
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Work
Occupation
Scientist (Animal Cognition), Science Writer, Photographer
Employment
  • Scientific American
    Writer, 2011 - present
  • BBC Future
    Writer, 2012 - 2013
  • University of Southern California
    Graduate Student, 2007 - 2013
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Single
Other names
jgold85
Story
Tagline
Scientist by day, science writer by night. I study the evolution of the mind. Scientist to the stars.
Introduction
Scientist by day, science writer by night. Areas: Cognitive neuroscience and animal cognition.

ScienceSeeker editor and Editor of Open Lab 2010. Photographer. Scientist to the stars.
Education
  • University of Southern California
    Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2013
  • University of Southern California
    M.A., Developmental Psychology, 2007 - 2009
  • University of Southern California