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Jari Juslin
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> “Be careful, it's the third rail.” I received this strong advice to steer clear of studying sex differences from a senior colleague around the year 2000 when my research into brain mechanisms of emotional memory began drawing me into the issue of sex differences—or better yet, sex influences—on brain function. And in a way, he was right. For the vast majority of his long and distinguished neuroscience career, exploring sex influences was indeed a terrific way for a brain scientist not studying reproductive functions to lose credibility at best, and at worst, become a pariah in the eyes of the neuroscience mainstream.

> Why was studying sex differences so taboo? [...] Due to a deeply ingrained, implicit (but false) assumption that “equal” means “the same,” most neuroscientists knew, and even feared that establishing that males and females are not the same in some aspect of brain function meant establishing that they were not equal. This assumption is false and deeply harmful, in particular to the health of women (see Cahill, 2014), but remains deeply impactful nonetheless.

> As a result of these powerful but misguided driving forces, today, sex influences of all types-and-sizes run unexamined and uncontrolled in neuroscience. Peruse the table of contents of any neuroscience journal and you will find that for easily over 95 percent of the studies one can (and in truth, should) ask “in males, or females, or both?” The answer is almost universally unknown, and worse, almost universally assumed not to matter.

> Fortunately, times are changing. The past 15 to 20 years in particular witnessed an explosion of research (despite the prevailing biases against the topic) documenting sex influences at all levels of brain function. So overpowering is the wave of research that the standard ways of dismissing sex influences (e.g., “They are all small and unreliable,” “They are all due to circulating hormones,” “They are all due to human culture,” and “They don't exist on the molecular level”) have all been swept away, at least for those cognizant of the research.

> This themed issue of the Journal of Neuroscience Research (JNR) heralds a zeitgeist shift. It is the first ever from a mainstream neuroscience journal entirely devoted to the issue of sex influences on brain/nervous system functioning. Papers from about 70 groups of authors, from those who have been investigating the issue for decades to those uncovering them only recently, forcefully document the fact that sex influences on brain function are ubiquitous, regularly reshaping findings—hence conclusions—at all levels of our field, and powerfully demonstrating how much “sex matters.”

> The fact that these ubiquitous sex influences are often unanticipated, or that we often cannot say conclusively what they “mean,” only heightens their evident importance, at least for those who believe that women should be treated equally with men by the biomedical research establishment. Consequently the papers in this issue force the conclusion that the status quo in neuroscience (whereby potential sex influences may be safely ignored or dismissed) is no longer scientifically defensible.

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Nukkukaa ihmiset tarpeeksi!

'Vä­häinen uni­määrä ei siis ol­lutkaan enää pröys­täilyn ai­he, vaan kuin liian ly­hyt pesu­koneen huuhte­luoh­jelma: pyyk­ki jäi­si tunkkai­seksi ja pesuai­ne­hiuk­kaset häirit­si­sivät käyt­täjää.'

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This is might progressive indeed! Kudos!

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“These organisms have been dormant but viable for geologically significant periods of time, and they can be released due to other geological processes,” says NASA Astrobiology Institute director Penelope Boston, who announced the find today at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “This has profound effects on how we try to understand the evolutionary history of microbial life on this planet.”

The conditions are also properly hellish:

'The cave is extremely hot, with air temperatures reaching up to 58 °C --- with 90 to 99 percent humidity. The cave is relatively unexplored due to these factors. Without proper protection, people can only endure approximately ten minutes of exposure at a time.' (Wikipedia)

Temps of 58C and sweating not working.

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Do note it's indeed simulation, not animation - you get slightly different results on every run. 

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Huhhuh.. Advertisement gone political. 

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'NHTSA --- [i]nvestigators found that Tesla vehicles crash rate dropped by almost 40% after Autosteer—one component of the Autopilot system—became available.'

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