Profile

Cover photo
Jarek Wilkiewicz
Works at Google
Attended Carnegie Mellon
Lives in Silicon Valley
6,800 followers|2,325,014 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

 
App vs applet, now vs then #reminiscing #90s 
44
9
Pierre-Antoine LaFayette's profile photoJanek Wagner's profile photoJin Hu's profile photoAndrew Potter's profile photo
3 comments
 
Sun did as well. Remember JavaOS? :)
Add a comment...
 
Google Search for Developers y'all! :) 
 
For nearly two decades, Google has been helping web developers connect their content to their users. But in today’s world, information can be found in apps, as well as websites. That’s why, today, we’re announcing Google Search for Developers, a single destination for information about all of the APIs that you can use to integrate with Search. To learn more, watch the video with +Jarek Wilkiewicz below, and visit https://g.co/developersearch to get started.
3 comments on original post
12
2
Somair Riaz's profile photoDan Scott's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
 
"@context":"http://schema.org",
"@type":"VideoObject",
"name": "JSON-LD: Core Markup"

Whoo-hoo - more videos have been uploaded by +Manu Sporny, including two new JSON-LD guides.

Great to see, too, some frames about linked data signatures and the web credentials work Manu and others have been working on lately (which, yes, is related to semantic search marketing, 'cause - as +David Amerland will happily tell you - linked identities loom large when it comes to semantic search addressing the big data problem of veracity).

Since the two JSON-LD videos were published on 14 Feb., a fitting opportunity for me to say yet again I heart Manu Sporny videos!

#jsonld   #semanticweb   #linkeddata   #webidentities  

What is JSON-LD?
Not new, but start here if you're interested in JSON-LD and haven't seen this video before
A short introduction to JSON-LD for Web developers, designers, and hobbyists. It covers how to express basic Linked Data in JSON.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vioCbTo3C-4

JSON-LD: Core Markup
An overview of some of the core markup features of JSON-LD including types, aliasing, nesting, and internationalization support.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmvWk_TQ30A

JSON-LD: Compaction and Expansion
An overview of JSON-LD's compaction and expansion features and how you can use them to merge data from multiple sources.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tm3fD89dqRE

Linked Data Signatures
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdUZaYeQblY
An overview of how digital signatures can be added to Linked Data to provide verifiable statements on the Web.

Credentials on the Web
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWtOg3vSzxI
A quick introduction to verifiable credentials on the Web

More on the Open Credentials initiative:
http://opencreds.org/
https://www.w3.org/community/credentials/
4 comments on original post
3
4
G. Hussain Chinoy's profile photoMichael Engineered's profile photoClemens Düpmeier's profile photoVincent Velema's profile photo
 
+Masatake Wasa​ I don't understand any of this but it may be of interest to you.
Add a comment...

Jarek Wilkiewicz

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Google Now has added a lot of new cards over the last year and now you're going to start seeing them from your favorite apps as well.
1 comment on original post
5
Add a comment...
 
Nice to see +The New York Times​ cover deep linking 
Navigating the Internet used to mean painstakingly typing the exact address you wanted into your computer. The web browser and the search engine simplified that, giving us the Internet we take for granted today. Now, across Silicon Valley, companies from tiny start-ups to titans like Google and ...
11
Add a comment...

Jarek Wilkiewicz

Shared publicly  - 
12
Jarek Wilkiewicz's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
6,800 people
L. Long Dessie's profile photo
Alifiyah Ganijee's profile photo
Raghib El Harrak's profile photo
Peter Bojanac's profile photo
MIguel play y Pc's profile photo
Justin Sze Chun Yin's profile photo
José Albert Chachapoyas Sánchez's profile photo
Videos Top's profile photo
Rodel Hidalgo's profile photo
 
One more good reason to get your app's deep links indexed
 
App deep link quality now used as a ranking signal

Yesterday, as part of our efforts to make your app content as accessible from Search as your site content, we announced that we will begin to use information from indexed apps as a factor in ranking (http://goo.gl/St6dRE). As a result, we will now surface content from indexed apps more prominently in search.

This ranking change is the next step in giving users better results on their mobile device. For you as a site owner or app developer, it’s a chance to engage them straight from the search results. 

Be sure to check out g.co/appindexing and watch the video below with +Jarek Wilkiewicz to learn more about how you can get your app content surfaced in search results.

#appindexing  
4 comments on original post
7
Jarek Wilkiewicz's profile photoKenichi Suzuki's profile photo
3 comments
 
The quality is good. Every webmasters/developers in Japan would understand what App Indexing is and how exciting it is.
Add a comment...

Jarek Wilkiewicz

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Here in the U.S. we've willingly and self-destructively permitted short-term Wall Street thinking to flush much of our best R&D talent down the proverbial toilet."
 
Google Glass vs. The USA's R&D Toilet

http://lauren.vortex.com/archive/001086.html

If you're a regular consumer of the computer industry trade press -- a strong stomach strongly recommended -- you've probably seen a bit of gloating lately about Google pulling their Google Glass device from most consumer marketing.

Mainstream media has picked up the drumbeat too, with even major publications like The New York Times very recently running stories purporting to explain why Google Glass has "failed" or how this is emblematic of Google's supposedly imminent fall.

Those stories sound pretty scary. They're also utterly wrong. And they're wrong in a way that exemplifies why so much of U.S. industry is in a terrible research and development (R&D) slump, and why Google should be congratulated for their "moonshots" -- not ridiculed.

Once upon a time -- not so long ago relatively -- there was a reasonable understanding in this country that long-term R&D was crucial to our technological, financial, and personal futures. That's long-term as in spending money on projects that might take a long time to pay off -- or might never pay off for the firms making the investments -- but that still might play crucial roles in our future going forward.

When we think about the foundation of modern R&D, it's typical for AT&T's Bell Telephone Laboratories (Bell Labs) to spring immediately to mind. Not the Bell Labs of today -- an emaciated skeleton of its former greatness -- but of the years before AT&T's 1984 Bell system beak-up divestiture and shortly thereafter. 

The list of developments that sprang forth from the Labs is mind-boggling. If Lucent Technologies did nothing else when they took over Bell Labs and hastened its decline, at least they produced in 2000 this great music video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzHp7Ahkjes) celebrating the Labs' innovations over the many decades. Mentally start subtracting out items from the list shown in that video and watch how our entire modern world would crumble away around us.

Yet -- and this is crucial -- most of those Bell Labs technologies that are so much a part of our lives today were anything but sure bets at the time they were being developed. Hell, who needs something better than trusty old vacuum tubes? What possible use is superconductivity? Why would anyone need flexible, easy to use computer operating systems?

It's only with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight that we can really appreciate the genius -- and critically the willingness to put sufficient R&D dollars behind such genius -- that allowed these technologies to flourish in the face of contemporaneous skepticism at the time.

Much of that kind of skepticism is driven by the twin prongs of people who basically don't understand technology deeply, and/or by investors who see any effort to be a waste if it isn't virtually guaranteed to bring in significant short-term profits.

But we see again and again what happens when technology companies fall prey to such short-term thinking. Magnificent firms like Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) vanish with relative rapidity into the sunset to be largely forgotten. Household names like Kodak flicker and fade away into shadows. And as noted, even the great Bell Labs has become the "reality show" version of its former self.

Nor is it encouraging when we see other firms who have had robust R&D efforts now culling them in various ways, such as Microsoft's very recent closing of their Silicon Valley research arm.

It probably shouldn't be surprising that various researchers from Microsoft, Bell Labs, and DEC have ended up at ... you guessed it ... Google.

So it also shouldn't be surprising why it's difficult not look askance at claims that Google is on the wrong path investing in autonomous cars, or artificial intelligence, or balloon-based Internet access -- or Google Glass.

Because even if one chooses inappropriately and inaccurately -- but for the sake of the argument -- to expound pessimistic consumer futures for those techs as currently defined, they will still change the world in amazingly positive ways. 

Internet access in the future inevitably will include high altitude distribution systems. AI will be solving problems the nature of which we can't even imagine today. Many thousands of lives will be saved by improved driver assist systems even if you sullenly choose to assume that autonomous cars don't become a mass consumer item in the near future. And medical, safety, and a range of industrial applications for Google Glass and similar devices are already rapidly deploying.

This is what serious R&D is really all about. Our collective and personal futures depend upon the willingness of firms to take these risks toward building tomorrow. 

We need far more firms willing to follow Google's R&D model in these regards, rather than being utterly focused on projects that might suck some coins quickly into the hopper, but do little or nothing to help their countries, their peoples, and the world in the long run. 

Here in the U.S. we've willingly and self-destructively permitted short-term Wall Street thinking to flush much of our best R&D talent down the proverbial toilet.

And unless we get our heads on straight about this immediately, we'll be sending our futures and our children's futures down the same dark sewer.

We are far better than that.

Take care, all.

-- Lauren --
10 comments on original post
3
1
Thad Guidry's profile photoDoug Lynch's profile photoGDG Space Coast's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Thad Guidry I was just having this discussion about how the current crop of investors are all about the short term profits and are always worried about their bottom line.

I can't help but imagine that Lucent and Bell Labs were very similar back in the day though. Especially during the times these innovations were worked on. Looking out for yourself isn't exclusive to the current generation. Is it?

I think it might be fair to say that Bell Labs was just more adventurous with their investments. Very similar to how Google is right now(and possibly how Apple will be now that they have 170+ billion in liquid assets).
Add a comment...

Jarek Wilkiewicz

Shared publicly  - 
16
1
Evelio Tarazona Cáceres's profile photoJose Alcérreca's profile photoFilip Hráček's profile photo
2 comments
 
I wonder why we only do the upside-down joke with Australia.
Add a comment...
 
A fun recent project:  #OkGoogle   show Santa on Santa Tracker :)

You'll need the Android app for this to work:  http://bit.ly/get-santa-tracker

Happy Holidays! 

#SantaTracker  
8
Add a comment...

Jarek Wilkiewicz

Shared publicly  - 
 
Gingerbread house at The Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco. A yearly tradition. 
9
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
6,800 people
L. Long Dessie's profile photo
Alifiyah Ganijee's profile photo
Raghib El Harrak's profile photo
Peter Bojanac's profile photo
MIguel play y Pc's profile photo
Justin Sze Chun Yin's profile photo
José Albert Chachapoyas Sánchez's profile photo
Videos Top's profile photo
Rodel Hidalgo's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Google Search Developer Advocate
Employment
  • Google
    Google Search Developer Advocate, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Silicon Valley
Previously
Memphis, TN - Krakow, Poland
Story
Tagline
Developer Advocate @ Google Search, born in Kraków, now in Menlo.
Education
  • Carnegie Mellon
  • The University of Memphis
  • Politechnika Wrocławska
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Apps with Google+ Sign-in