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Jannik Lindquist
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Attended University of Copenhagen
Lives in Copenhagen, Denmark
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Highly recommended documentary about Greenpeace on Netflix 
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In de jaren 70 richtte een groep activisten die protesteerden tegen nucleaire proeven, de iconische milieuorganisatie Greenpeace op.
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My first time as a backer of a Kickstarter-project
How does change happen? We go on a trip with Robert Reich outside the “bubble” to reach folks in the heartland of America to find out.
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He's one of my biggest heroes currently
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I wrote this last year in May - a few days after Collections was launched. It seems even more relevant now.
 
On content platforms and social networks

Obviously, on a content platform content is primary, relations secondary. On a social network the reverse is true. Facebook is the quintessential social network. We are not primarily there because of the content but because of our friends and family. Facebook desperately wants to become a content platform but it's dna seem to work against it. It has carefully trained it's users to only share content with friends and family. Facebook thinks of its users as consumers who they hope to sell "professional" content. However, as has been pointed out many times, Facebooks users are not primarily there to buy stuff but to hangout with their friends and family.

Google+ and Twitter are quintessential content platforms. We are first and foremost there because of the content. Obviously, though, Twitter is a very, very limited content platform. It only has very limited support for other content than text - and even text is extremely limited. Google+, on the other hand, is already itself a sophisticated content platform with great support for both text and images - and when you add YouTube and Blogger (and possibly Google Music?) to the mix it becomes clear that Google is about to build an extremely powerful content platform - and it has high expectations to its users and thinks of them all as potential providers of knockout content.

Obviously, the competition is fully aware of this - which certainly explains a lot of the hate from the media. They always saw Google as an evil company who stole "their" income from ads. Now they realize that Google has the potential to steal their entire business. Same with Facebook. They are desperately aware of their limitations and it's time for us to wake up too and stop letting anyone fool us into thinking that Facebook has the lead. You shouldn't be comparing G+ to Facebook but Google's entire content suite to what Facebook has to offer.

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The term that Facebook "focus" reminds me of is more like "everything and the kitchen sink". They have repeatedly done various things to "take over" the open Internet, with varying degrees of success, with parallels to the "bronze age" Internet portals (like AOL and Yahoo) trying to avoid users seeking freedom on the untamed wilderness of unfiltered experiences and contact of unmanaged IP services. Of course, that also includes content; what concerns me is the more or less overt border wall being erected to deliberately hinder the ability of "outside" services to compete for engagement among Facebookers.
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"Det eneste formål, hvortil magt legitimt kan anvendes mod et individ i et samfund mod dennes vilje, er for at forhindre ham i at skade andre"

- John Stuart Mill, On Liberty, 1859
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En opgørelse fra FN’s landbrugsorganisation viser, at produktionen af kød og mælk allerede i dag står for 18 procent af verdens udslip af drivhusgasser. Vores overdådige indtag af kød er med andre ord økologisk uholdbart.
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En afgift på kød harmonerer faktisk udmærket med liberalismens grundlæggende skadesprincip.
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"They live ill who are always beginning to live." You are right in asking why; the saying certainly stands in need of a commentary. It is because the life of such persons is always incomplete. But a man cannot stand prepared for the approach of death if he has just begun to live. We must make it our aim already to have lived long enough"

Seneca, Letters 23.9-10
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In other words, do not wait for that one fine day......... Dive into it right away !
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Looking forward to rehearse Elizabethan lute duets with my daughter :-)
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I will, +Melina M​ :-)
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Seneca against nationalism:

"Turn now from heavenly to human affairs, and you’ll see that whole tribes and peoples have changed their abode. What’s the meaning of Greek cities in the heart of barbarian territories? Why is the Macedonian tongue heard among Indians and Persians? Scythia and that whole region of wild and unconquered tribes show Achaean cities established on the shores of the Black Sea; neither the harshness of the perpetual winter nor the character of the inhabitants, savage like their climate, deterred migrants from settling there. There is a mass of Athenians in Asia; Miletus has sent forth in different directions enough people to fill seventy-five cities; the entire coast of Italy that is washed by the Lower Sea became Greater Greece; Asia claims the Etruscans as her own; Tyrians have settled in Africa, Carthaginians in Spain; Greeks have forced their way into Gaul, Gauls into Greece; the Pyrenees did not prevent the Germans from crossing. Through pathless regions and unknown parts, the restlessness of mankind has made its way. Children and wives and parents heavy with age were dragged along. Some peoples, driven to and fro in their long wandering, did not deliberately choose their destination but wearily settled on the land that was nearest; others established their right in a foreign country by force of arms. Some tribes were engulfed by the sea when they were going in quest of unknown lands, while some settled at the place where they were stranded because their supplies had run out. Nor did they all have the same motive for leaving and seeking a new homeland. The destruction of their cities by enemy attack forced some to escape to foreign lands when they were robbed of their own; some were dislodged by political discord at home; some were sent out to relieve the burden caused by the overcrowding of an excessive population; some were driven out by disease, by frequent earthquakes, or by some unbearable deficiencies in the unproductive soil; some were beguiled by overblown reports of a fertile shore. Different peoples have been led by different causes to leave their homes, but this at least is clear: nothing has stayed where it came into being. The human race is constantly running this way and that, and in a world so vast something changes every day: the foundations of new cities are laid and new names of nations emerge, while older powers are obliterated or transformed into a subsidiary of astronger power. But all these migrations of peoples - what are they but states of communal exile? Why drag you through so lengthy a cycle? Why bother to mention Antenor, the founder of Padua, and Evander, who established the Arcadian kingdom on the banks of the Tiber? Why mention Diomedes and others, conquered as well as conquerors, who were scattered over foreign lands by the Trojan War? To be sure, the Roman Empire itself looks back to an exile as its founder - a refugee from his captured city who, taking with him its few survivors, was forced by fear of the conqueror to make for distant parts and was brought to Italy. In turn, this people - how many colonies has it sent to every province! Wherever the Romans have conquered, there they settle. People willingly put their names down for this kind of migration, and even old men left their altars and followed the colonists overseas. The point needs no listing of further instances, but I’ll nevertheless add one that forces itself on my attention: this very island has often changed its population. To pass over its earlier history, which the long passage of time has obscured, the Greeks who left Phocis and now inhabit Massilia first settled on this island. What caused them to leave it is unclear, whether the harshness of the climate, or their close-up view of Italy’s outstanding power, or the shortage of harbors. For the cause was evidently not the savagery of the native inhabitants, given that they settled among the most fierce and uncivilized peoples of Gaul at that time. Subsequently the Ligurians crossed to the island, and also the Spanish, as is plain from their similar customs: the islanders wear the same head coverings and the same kind of shoes as the Cantabrians, and certain words are the same - but some only, because their language as a whole has lost its original character through association with the Greeks and Ligurians. Later, two colonies of Roman citizens were founded, one by Marius, another by Sulla: so often has the population of this barren and thorny rock been changed! To sum up, you’ll scarcely find any land which is still lived in by its original inhabitants; every population consists of mixed and foreign stock. One people has come after another, what one people has viewed with disdain another has ardently desired, and one people has expelled another only to be driven out itself. So it is by decree of fate that nothing remains where it is in the same condition forever".

- Seneca, Consolation to Helvia 7.1-10

#stoicism #change

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+Jannik Lindquist As we saw in the U.S. in the 1940's and again in the 1950's. Sure- to a lesser degree today, but those decades were nationalism at its worst.
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Latest news from the world's most happy country
 
'Police suddenly began hitting everyone who was watching'
Video footage of police brutality has emerged from Copenhagen, showing officers hitting people with batons and violently detaining a man, despite onlookers saying he couldn't breathe. A videographer filming the chaos was left injured and bloodied.
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Sometimes the best way to start is to obey the law and stop throwing rocks and bottles at the police. The area Where this happened is infected with scumbags, drug dealers and other low life. There's always at least two sides to a story.
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This passage is a good example of how Seneca refines and expands orthodox Stoicism. The standard Stoic analysis of fear is that it is simply a passion that is caused by lacking understanding of "what is terrible and what is not terrible". But Seneca knows that there is much more to fear. He shows us how we terrorise ourselves by using our imagination to anticipate things that might never happen.

"There are more things, Lucilius, likely to frighten us than there are to crush us; we suffer more often in imagination than in reality. I am not speaking with you in the Stoic strain but in my milder style. For it is our Stoic fashion to speak of all those things,which provoke cries and groans, as unimportant and beneath notice; but you and I must drop such great-sounding words, although, heaven knows, they are true enough. What I advise you to do is, not to be unhappy before the crisis comes; since it may be that the dangers before which you paled as if they were threatening you, will never come upon you; they certainly have not yet come. Accordingly, some things torment us more than they ought; some torment us before they ought; and some torment us when they ought not to torment us at all. We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow"

"The first of these three faults may be postponed for the present, because the subject is under discussion and the case is still in court, so to speak. That which I should call trifling, you will maintain to be most serious; for of course I know that some men laugh while being flogged, and that others wince at a box on the ear. We shall consider later whether these evils derive their power from their own strength, or from our own weakness. Do me the favour, when men surround you and try to talk you into believing that you are unhappy, to consider not what you hear but what you yourself feel, and to take counsel with your feelings and question yourself independently, because you know your own affairs better than anyone else does. Ask: "Is there any reason why these persons should condole with me? Why should they be worried or even fear some infection from me, as if troubles could be transmitted? Is there any evil involved, or is it a matter merely of ill report, rather than an evil?" Put the question voluntarily to yourself: "Am I tormented without sufficient reason, am I morose, and do I convert what is not an evil into what is an evil?" You may retort with the question: "How am I to know whether my sufferings are real or imaginary?" Here is the rule for such matters: we are tormented either by things present, or by things to come, or by both. As to things present, the decision is easy. Suppose that your person enjoys freedom and health, and that you do not suffer from any external injury. As to what may happen to it in the future, we shall see later on. To-day there is nothing wrong with it. "But," you say, "something will happen to it." First of all, consider whether your proofs of future trouble are sure. For it is more often the case that we are troubled by our apprehensions, and that we are mocked by that mocker, rumour, which is wont to settle wars, but much more often settles individuals. Yes, my dear Lucilius; we agree too quickly with what people say. We do not put to the testthose things which cause our fear; we do not examine into them; we blench and retreat just like soldiers who are forced to abandon their camp because of a dust-cloud raised by stampeding cattle, or are thrown into a panic by the spreading of some unauthenticated rumour. And somehow or other it is the idle report that disturbs us most. For truth has its own definite boundaries, but that which arises from uncertainty is delivered over to guesswork and the irresponsible license of a frightened mind. That is why no fear is so ruinous and so uncontrollable as panic fear. For other fears are groundless, but this fear is witless. Let us, then, look carefully into the matter. It is likely that some troubles will befall us; but it is not a present fact. How often has the unexpected happened! How often has the expected never come to pass! And even though it is ordained to be, what does it avail torun out to meet your suffering? You will suffer soon enough, when it arrives; so look forward meanwhile to better things. What shall you gain by doing this? Time. There will be many happenings meanwhile which will serve to postpone, or end, or pass on to another person, the trials which are near or even in your very presence. A fire has opened the way to flight. Men have been let down softly by a catastrophe. Sometimes the sword has been checked even at the victim's throat. Men have survived their own executioners. Even bad fortune is fickle. Perhaps it will come, perhaps not; in the meantime it is not. So look forward to better things. The mind at times fashions for itself false shapes of evil when there are no signs that point to any evil; it twists into the worst construction some word of doubtful meaning; or it fancies some personal grudge to be more serious than it really is, considering not how angry the enemy is, but to what lengths he may go if he is angry. But life is not worth living, and there is no limit to our sorrows, if we indulge our fears to the greatest possible extent; in this matter, let prudence help you, and contemn with a resolute spirit even when it is in plain sight. If you cannot do this, counter one weakness with another, and temper your fear with hope. There is nothing so certain among these objects of fear that it is not more certain still that things we dread sink into nothing and that things we hope for mock us. Accordingly, weigh carefully your hopes as well as your fears, and whenever all the elements are in doubt, decide in your own favour; believe what you prefer. And if fear wins a majority of the votes, incline in the other direction anyhow, and cease to harass your soul, reflecting continually that most mortals, even when no trouble are actually at hand or are certainly to be expected in the future, become excited and disquieted. No one calls a halt on himself, when he begins to be urged ahead; nor does he regulate his alarm according to the truth. No one says; "The author of the story is a fool, and he who has believed it is a fool, as well as he who fabricated it." We let ourselves drift with every breeze; we are frightened at uncertainties, just as if they were certain. We observe no moderation. The slightest thing turns the scales and throws us forthwith into a panic"

Seneca, Letters 13.6-12
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It's also worth pointing out that as a Software Architect, this is something I heavily advise. I often tell people "Architecture that protect from foreseeable change has foreseeable value. Architecture that protects from imaginary change has imaginary value". In other words, worry about the foreseeable, not the imaginary.
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More than a million, including 300,000 children, live in 'extreme poverty' in the UK http://aje.io/rty9
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The chasm seems to get wider and wider, it's ashame since money's are misappropriated so often. 
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Reposting this
 
So why do I focus almost exclusively on Seneca in my posts about Stoicism? Here is part of the answer:

"Seneca remains, for us today no less than for the revivers of Stoicism in the sixteenth century, our best representative of ancient Stoicism. In his case as in few others we have the luxury of reading, with their full contexts, whole works of philosophy by a Stoic. He is still an excellent, indeed indispensable, source for those who may wish to learn about, and learn from, Stoicism and its outlook on life"

Seneca - Moral and Political Essays. Edited and translated by John M. Cooper and J. F. Procopé, Cambridge University Press, 1995, location 446
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Thanks for remember me " Seneca" because we always talk what about Socrates says and forget the great and wonderful phylosopher was Seneca.
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"Philosophy is no trick to catch the public; it is not devised for show. It is a matter, not of words, but of facts. It is not pursued in order that the day may yield some amusement before it is spent, or that our leisure may be relieved of a tedium that irks us. It moulds and constructs the soul; it orders our life, guides our conduct, shows us what we should do and what we should leave undone; it sits at the helm and directs our course as we waver amid uncertainties. Without it, no one can live fearlessly or in peace of mind. Countless things that happen every hour call for advice; and such advice is to be sought in philosophy"

- Seneca, Letters 16.4

https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/Moral_letters_to_Lucilius/Letter_16

#stoicism #mindfulness 
It is clear to you, I am sure, Lucilius, that no man can live a happy life, or even a supportable life, without the study of wisdom; you know also that a happy life is reached when our wisdom is brought to completion, but that life is at least endurable even when our wisdom is only begun.
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True. Great point. Kay rich
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Jannik's Collections
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Work
Occupation
Freelance philosopher - teaching, talking, writing, counseling
Skills
Philosophical counseling, self-improvement, happiness, resilience, value clarification, Stoicism, Socratic group discussion, customer relations, public speaking, writing, teaching, coaching, blogging
Employment
  • Freelance
    Freelance philosopher, 2006 - present
    Philosophical counseling, public lectures, courses and writing
  • Apps Edu
    Owner, 2012 - 2013
    Training and advicing in the use of Google products such as Google Apps, Android, Chrome OS/Chromebooks, Google+/Hangouts
  • Berlingske Media
    Teacher at Berlingske eAcademy, 2011 - 2013
    Teaching employees at Berlingske Media how to get the most out of Google products
  • Berlingske Media
    Serviceleader, 2008 - 2012
  • Berlingske Media
    Google support, 2010 - 2010
  • Alsted Research
    2007 - 2007
  • Institut for Opinionsanalyse
    2006 - 2006
  • Bonnier
    2005 - 2006
  • University of Copenhagen
    Research assistant, 2004 - 2004
  • University of Copenhagen
    Instructor, 2002 - 2002
  • Berlingske Media
    Servicepartner, 2007 - 2008
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Currently
Copenhagen, Denmark
Story
Tagline
philosopher, father, son, brother, friend, luteplayer, photographer, western connoisseur, Google geek
Introduction
Trained as a philosopher. Live with my two kids, Sikker and Kirstine, in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

I'm particularly interested in:

- Theories about happiness, wisdom and the good life - first and foremost the ancient Greek and Roman eudamonistic tradition as we know it from the writings of Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics.

- Human beings as social/political animals

- How we understand the life we live through the stories we tell

- Philosophical counseling

Apart from my philosophical interests, I'm interested in technology as a user who is very particular about his tools. Because of this, I occasionally write about Android phones and tablets and Chrome OS, Google+ and Blogger
Bragging rights
One of the first persons (outside Google) on Google+. Certainly the first Dane. Prove me wrong, if you like :-)
Education
  • University of Copenhagen
    Philosophy
  • University of Copenhagen
    Classics
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
March 2, 1965
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One of my favorite places in Copenhagen
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Best pizzas on Østerbro as far as me and my kids are concerned. Superfriendly and easy going staff
Food: Very GoodDecor: GoodService: Excellent
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Lots of delicious stuff in very lovely surroundings - but extremely expensive! 45 DKK for one very small cup of chai? And 35 DKK for a cookie? I think not. Not recommended because of the prizes
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Inviting and friendly place with great atmosphere and lots of beers from around the world.
Atmosphere: ExcellentDecor: GoodService: Excellent
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