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Jan Miksovsky
Worked at Cozi
Lives in Seattle, WA
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Jan Miksovsky

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A quick experiment to create #webcomponents  using #Polymer  0.8-preview and #es6  class syntax. Feels good to me.
polymer-classes-in-es6 - Create a Polymer custom element using ES6 class syntax.
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Jan Miksovsky

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Our new web components tutorial is up!
 
Looking for a quick introduction to #webcomponents? We put together an interactive tutorial that covers all the basics. It runs in your browser, so there's nothing to install, and works in all the modern browsers. We wrote it for a general audience — not just for hard-core front-end devs, but for anyone who's familiar with HTML.
Supercharge your HTML powers with web components: A quick, interactive tutorial. Web components are a new HTML technology that makes it much easier to create great web sites and apps. This interactive tutorial will teach you the basics of using web components. Each short lesson in this tutorial ...
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Jan Miksovsky

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Speaking at the +Polymer Polytechnic event in Seattle this past weekend was a blast!
 
Event Recap: GDG Seattle Polymer Hackademic

Venue: Google Seattle | Nov 14, 2014 | 8:30 - 17:00

85 online registrations.
65 attended in person | 5 watched live stream | 50+ viewed talks on YouTube.

Attendees learned getting the most out of web components requires a change in mindset. Component Kitchen founder Jan Miksovsky presented both an introduction on Web Components, and a more advanced talk that assumes basic familiarity with web components and Google’s Polymer framework and a set of principles for creating components that can quickly be remixed and adapted in a variety of applications. 

Each of the Jan's talks was followed by a hands on Polymer codelab, and additional hacking. Most attendees choose to create their own polymer component. We wrapped up the day with demos. This including an Etch-A-Sketch and Auto-Completion on big data list coded in Polymer and shared on github.        

8:30 am Arrival and registration 
9:00 am Web Components 101 
10:30 am Coffee break 
10:45 am Chrome Dev Editor and Polymer Application - Code Lab 
12:00 pm Lunch 
1:00 pm Designing Web Components for Reuse  
2:30 pm Polymer Apps and Mobile Web Development  
3:30 pm Q&A 
4:00 pm Closing

Photos - https://plus.google.com/111739836936169749229/posts/89keeYoJsMC
Event - http://www.meetup.com/seattle-gdg/events/155658502/ 
Video - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWfeS6EKrOrq1YfzTtZJfug

#report #gdg #Seattle #itshackademic , #devfest14 , #devfest #polymer  
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Jan Miksovsky

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My latest set of contributions to the Basic Web Components project pertains to creating calendars.

The moon phase calendar was fun to write, although it proved trickier than expected to find a simple JavaScript calculation of moon phase. Most of the moon phase calculations I could find are based on a BASIC program listing that appeared in the March 1985 issue of Sky & Telescope magazine.
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Awesome! Having just dipped my feet into various globalization issues recently, I can really appreciate the huge benefits that having a general-purpose, wide-audience component like this will provide!
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Doing a good job showing off components means overcoming some limitations of iframes. Good thing we can use components to solve that problem, too!
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There are already a few projects that build Dart widgets based on Web Components/Polymer.dart
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/23090761/does-dart-have-a-widget-library
(see "for Polymer.dart" section) and several others, (see http://pub.dartlang.org/search?q=polymer - lists also a lot of libraries related to Polymer.dart which are not Web Components though)
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Jan Miksovsky

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Some notes on the UI and construction of the #webcomponents -based printable calendar project I published last week.

I was happy with how one of my layout tricks saved some vertical space, and amused when an obscure language broke this layout. (Beware the ides of pâ´zzlâšttammään.)
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Jan Miksovsky

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Have you ever wanted to subclass #webcomponents, where the subclass should be able to fill in visible parts of the base class? After two years of waiting for progress at the standards/browser level, I may have finally found an approach that hits the key criteria. As a bonus, the solution itself can be cleanly wrapped up in a +Polymer component.

I'm interested in feedback on this answer; please give it a try!
base-template - Allow a subclass to fill in slots in a base class' template.
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Yes, I've wanted to do exactly this a few times. I'll check it out!
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We're happy to help make the web more accessible. A list box component in the open source project we sponsor, Basic Web Components, was recently upgraded with built-in ARIA support. We strongly believe that the ability to finally share UI components will change the economics of investments in fundamentals like accessibility. Those who understand how to do things like accessibility right can embody their knowledge in sharable code that can benefit everyone.
This review focuses not on a component, but an aspect of a component called basic-list-box. Component Kitchen released that component under the aegis of the Basic Web Components project. In our reviews, we want to avoid focusing too much on our own work, but in this case we can happily feature a ...
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We've started writing a new series of reviews about #webcomponents on our redesigned Component Kitchen company blog. Our goal is to highlight interesting work, inspire people, and help them discover components they can use in their own apps.

An important design goal for me is that each review be able to include a simple demo. This turns out to be a lot harder than it sounds! There's a big difference between simply looking over someone else's code and having to actually install, understand, and use it. Nevertheless, it's exciting to see the activity in the industry.
Welcome to Component Kitchen, a place to learn about the new web components features in HTML that will transform how you create web apps and sites! The following Staff Reviews look at web components we think are notable: they're good examples to follow, or they solve a common problem, ...
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Jan Miksovsky

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Another component I've contributed to the Basic Web Components project is a standard single-selection list box called basic-list-box.

The conventional web browser list box UI has, somewhat stupidly, assumed that the only reason you'd ever want to use a plain list box is when soliciting multiple selection. If you use the select tag to create a single-selection list in HTML, the universal browser answer is to always show the list of a choices as a dropdown list. The choices aren't even shown until the user interacts with the dropdown.

That's absurd. While dropdown list boxes have their place, plain (non-dropdown) list boxes are an equally (if not more) important UI for selecting from lists. There are numerous benefits:
1) The user can easily see the choices.
2) It's clear that they have a choice to make (as opposed to a dropdown, which obscures the presence of alternatives).
3) Mouse selection is faster.
4) Keyboard selection is less fussy.

If you've got the space for a plain list box, and you want to encourage the user to make a selection, consider using a plain list box instead of a dropdown. Now you can do so easily with a web component.

Bonus: Good keyboard navigation!
Another bonus: Show any kind of thing as a list item, not just text strings!

Web components FTW.
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Jan Miksovsky

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I recently contributed a small handful of web components to the Basic Web Components project, and wanted to share some observations on how designing and building UI with web components is going to be pretty different from how web UI has been created in the past.
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Jan Miksovsky

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+Dimitri Glazkov: This is important work on the foundation of the web. I've argued (http://miksovsky.blogs.com/flowstate/2012/09/) that it's highly productive to look at UI elements in terms of the fundamental building blocks they need. (If you haven't read McCarthy's Roots of Lisp, it's worth reading. See the blog post for links.) I was looking at the layer above the standard HTML elements, but it's awesome to see an investigation at and beneath that layer.

(And +1 on a childrenChanged callback.)
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  • Cozi
    Software Designer, 2005 - 2011
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    User Interface Architect, 1988 - 2004
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