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James Mason

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If you did Nazi that coming, you haven't been paying attention.
 
“Aus Cleveland, mit deutschem Gruß” [1]

This image is actually an excellent illustration of the two varieties of the "German Greeting." As Wikipedia notes, [2] "Hitler gave the salute in two ways. When reviewing his troops or crowds, he generally used the traditional stiff armed salute. When greeting individuals, he used a modified version of the salute, bending his right arm while holding an open hand towards those greeted at shoulder height." I doubt he ever managed quite this smooth a transition between the two, though.

(For those who are about to argue that it was really a wave taken out of context... yes. That's absolutely possible. And an excuse like that would be perfectly reasonable the first time, or even the second time. But six months into a campaign where "did they really mean that Nazi reference?" comes up every week at the most, where speeches talk about nothing but the importance of the leader's unfettered Will and how this strengthens the nation against the other races which are slowly corrupting and destroying it, any benefit of the doubt is long lost.

In fact, it's actively inappropriate; when something has become clear and you still try to excuse it with a "benefit of the doubt," you're not being polite, you're abetting it.)

[1] "From Cleveland, with German Greetings." See: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/laura-ingraham-called-appearing-nazi-salute-article-1.2719389
[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazi_salute
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Luke Shiras's profile photo
 
It seems so obvious now.
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James Mason

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1939?
 
In an amazing interview -- while watching the convention on TV -- Trump discussed some of his extreme (and very non-Republican) views on foreign policy. (I say extreme, not as a pejorative, but as a simple description. Most mainstream politicians in both parties would count his views as extreme.)

Trump called into question whether, as president, he would automatically extend the security guarantees that give the 28 members of NATO the assurance that the full force of the United States military has their back.

For example, asked about Russia’s threatening activities that have unnerved the small Baltic States that are the most recent entrants into NATO, Mr. Trump said that if Russia attacked them, he would decide whether to come to their aid only after reviewing whether those nations “have fulfilled their obligations to us.”

Mr. Trump conceded that his approach to dealing with the United States’ allies and adversaries was radically different from the traditions of the Republican Party — whose candidates, since the end of World War II, have almost all pressed for an internationalist approach in which the United States is the keeper of the peace, the “indispensable nation.”

Trump reiterated his threat to pull back United States troops deployed around the world, he said, “We are spending a fortune on military in order to lose $800 billion,” citing what he called America’s trade losses. “That doesn’t sound very smart to me.”

Mr. Trump repeatedly defined American global interests almost purely in economic terms. Its roles as a peacekeeper, as a provider of a nuclear deterrent against adversaries like North Korea, as an advocate of human rights and as a guarantor of allies’ borders were each quickly reduced to questions of economic benefit to the United States.

Mr. Trump gave no ground, whether the subject was countering North Korea’s missile and nuclear threats or dealing with China in the South China Sea. The forward deployment of American troops abroad, he said, while preferable, was not necessary.

“If we decide we have to defend the United States, we can always deploy” from American soil, Mr. Trump said, “and it will be a lot less expensive.”

Many military experts dispute that view, saying the best place to keep missile defenses against North Korea is in Japan and the Korean Peninsula. Maintaining such bases only in the United States can be more expensive because of the financial support provided by Asian nations.

Mr. Trump had nothing but praise for President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the country’s increasingly authoritarian but democratically elected leader. “I give great credit to him for being able to turn that around,” Mr. Trump said of the coup attempt on Friday night.

Asked if Mr. Erdogan was exploiting the coup attempt to purge his political enemies, Mr. Trump did not call for the Turkish leader to observe the rule of law, or Western standards of justice. “When the world sees how bad the United States is and we start talking about civil liberties, I don’t think we are a very good messenger,” he said.

His discussion of how to fight ISIS provided a good illustration of how little Trump understands about the complexity of international issues.

Mr. Trump said he was convinced that he could persuade Mr. Erdogan to put more effort into fighting the Islamic State. But the Obama administration has run up, daily, against the reality that the Kurds — among the most effective forces the United States is supporting against the Islamic State — are being attacked by Turkey, which fears they will create a breakaway nation.

Asked how he would solve that problem, Mr. Trump paused, then said: “Meetings.”

When asked what [America First] meant to him, [he said] “We are going to take care of this country first before we worry about everyone else in the world.”

It's not clear how we do that and fight ISIS at the same time. But he apparently wasn't worried about that conflict.

And finally if anyone doubted Trump's narcissism, when asked what he hoped people would take away from the convention, Mr. Trump said, “The fact that I’m very well liked.”
Reiterating a hard-line nationalist approach, Mr. Trump raised new questions about his commitment to automatically defend NATO allies.
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Graham Merrill (teddgram)'s profile photo
 
Don't they mean the Axis Allies?
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James Mason

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It’s checkers and chess: the game boards may look identical, but one is a kid-friendly diversion and one is a sport of kings.


Pokémon Go already has a roadmap to become a better game
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Checkers has advantages over chess, too. Especially if you don't have time for a long game...
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Via +Yonatan Zunger​​, who points out that BRExit is not all about racism, just mostly about racism. Just like the Confederate States' secession "wasn't all about slavery".

2016 is looking a little too much like 1932.
 
These are snippets from the new, post- #Brexit United Kingdom. They are originally from a huge Facebook album, and I am resharing them here because some people can't access that album.

https://www.facebook.com/sarah.leblanc.718/media_set?set=a.10101369198638985&type=3

Now, some of you might think I am posting this to make an "anti-British statement. But really, I am not.

Instead, I want to make a statement how close xenophobia and racism are slumbering under the surface of society, and how easily they can emerge.

Because I suspect... no, I know damn well that the same could happen in my native Germany. There are already significant groups pandering to hate, racism, and intolerance. PEGIDA. The Alternative für Deutschland party. And if more mainstream politicians feel that they must pander to these, baser instincts - if they indicate that displaying xenophobia is something socially acceptable - then racist incidents will surge just as much in Germany as it is now happening in the United Kingdom.

This could be us.
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Tony Owen's profile photo
 
Yes it's unfortunate that racism had anything to do with this referendum. But that's what happens when UKIP and that cunt Nigel Farage gets involved 😠
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2016, so far, in a nutshell.
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Haven't the last eight years of neo-conservatism and Democratic deference brought the country too close already to a one-party state masquerading as a two-party state?

positions of the US primary candidates 2016
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I agree we can see there is interest in the far left and far right. Unfortunately, radicals are growing in politics. But that doesn't change the fact that the center still lies between the two major parties.
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So our choices are an egotistical self-centered autocrat or an egotistical self-centered fascist.

And this is what became of government of the people, for the people, and by the people.

240 years. It was good while it lasted.😢
Hillary Clinton has disqualified herself from the presidency.
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From a recently popular production:
[ELIZA]
Angelica, tell this man John Adams spends the summer with his family

[HAMILTON]
Angelica, tell my wife John Adams doesn’t have a real job anyway

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With the UK and USA poised to descend into fascism, is it any surprise that Russia is slipping into Stalinism?
 
Russia moves toward alarming new counter-terrorism law

The lower house of Russia's parliament has passed so-called anti-terrorism legislation that would allow steep prison sentences for dissent, and require ISPs and phone companies to store huge amounts of communications for long periods of time, The Guardian reports. The "Yarovaya law" would also make it a crime not to report information about terrorist attacks and other crimes, require telecoms to assist the government to break into encrypted messages, and increase the strongest penalty for "extremism" from four to eight years of imprisonment, according to The Guardian. Even this bill, which was passed on Friday, is softer than a previous version which would have allowed the government to strip Russians of citizenship.
The lower house of Russia's parliament has passed so-called anti-terrorism legislation that would allow steep prison sentences for dissent, and require ISPs and phone companies to store huge...
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Dr. Strange BRExit
Or: how the UK learned to stop worrying about fascism, and love Kristallnacht.

More than a hundred incidents of racial abuse and hate crime have been reported since the UK voted to leave the European Union. Many of the alleged perpetrators cited the decision to leave the EU explicitly. One video, purportedly filmed in Hackney on the morning after the referendum, shows a man arguing with someone in a car before yelling: “Go back to your country.”
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