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James Lamb
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James Lamb

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So many deaths occurred enroute of the second fleet of convicts to Australia that it was considered one of the worst maritime accidents of the era - a fatality rate higher than slave ships common at the time. Why did England have so many convicts?
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"These problems were compounded by massive unemployment due to the ‘Industrial Revolution’. Food and materials once supplied from farms across the British Isles were now replaced by imports that were processed in mills and factories. British farm owners turned their land over to sheep grazing. They evicted farm labourers and their families, who, with no jobs and nowhere to live, flocked to the cities looking for work in the mills."

http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibition/objectsthroughtime/sirius-anchor-cannon/
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Of course, in the context of the times, the deaths were a drop in the bucket compared to the ongoing slave trade and introduction of smallpox to the "new world" or new worlds.
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Was looking at some fishing boats. Not sure how this works, but a lot of stainless steel (maybe snaps) attached to heavy nylon leaders. Elsewhere on the boat(s - two of this type) were beacons with flashers and antennae? maybe gps locators so they could go back and pick them up later.
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James Lamb

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Note how the British and Australians say "different to" rather than "different from". 
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I feel like I could get on board with this movement.
 
Huehuehue
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Oops.
 
Funny

This cartoon made me laugh out loud.  Now I've become 'desensitized' and can't get myself to laugh even if I try.  That's how it usually works with jokes.  But why was it funny?

First, the surprise.  We see this woman's chance of getting the job suddenly drop to zero.   We don't know much about her except that she's blonde and has carefully curled hair and an expensive-looking cashmere sweater... and that's she's the sort of person who is looking for a job where personal skills matter.  All this makes her tactless and profane comment completely unexpected.

Second, the self-referentiality.  I admit to loving self-referential humor - it's a weakness of mine, surely related to studying mathematical logic.  But it's best when it's subtle.  Here we a kind of mutant version of the Liar Paradox, which is not a paradox but a joke: "My honesty is a weakness, and I don't give a shit what you think."  But it's been cleverly written into a dialogue, with the last line suddenly making the pieces fit together.

Third, the profanity.  Intellectually I don't like this because it confuses honesty with bluntness or even rudeness. If she'd said "I don't care what you think", that would still be honest.  She would still not get the job.  But would the cartoon still be as funny?  There is no way for me to go back in time and find out!  But profanity in a job interview transgresses social norms and shocks us... and that probably helps make us laugh... except for those of us who find the cartoon offensive for this reason.  (If you're one of those, I apologize.)

Fourth, the smiling faces of the interviewers.  They are crucial somehow.

Fifth, it makes us think.  It's made me think quite a bit about the advantages and dangers of honesty, or really forthrightness: saying what you think when it's not completely necessary. Sometimes it's almost suicidal.   Sometimes it's unpleasant.  Sometimes it's a great thing!   And sometimes it's unpleasant and a great thing.

What do you think?  Please be honest. But not too honest.

I got this cartoon from +Malin Christersson, who got it from Mahendra Kariya, who probably got it from someone else....
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Thanks to the worm bin, which I dumped into the back of the yard, we now have some tomatoes? We'll see how big they get. 
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I knew that :-)
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James Lamb

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Hey - I think I want to make some of these to hand out to people - but I'm not a number anymore, I'm just +JamesLamb ?

http://www.hangoutgraphics.com/idcard/
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+Moritz Tolxdorff +Mohammad Eshbeata
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This is one of the better explorations I've seen of San Francisco's housing issues and the tech backlash. It's very long, but thorough.

http://techcrunch.com/2014/04/14/sf-housing/
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I always thought the problem was that I had to work part-time while attending school full-time. Now that I'm just attending school and not employed, I realize that the problem is actually "drinking from the fire hydrant".  The only enjoyable learning is self-learning or one class at a time.  I'm not a fan of skimming or just doing enough to get by, and I like having a balanced life. To me, learning was always the object - but when the fountain is a fire hydrant, that's painful.
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p.s. I'm going to edit the post for more clarity...
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James Lamb

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Had not heard of this phenomenon!
 
Prince Rupert's Drops or  Dutch tears 

Prince Rupert's Drops or Dutch tears are drops of tempered glass, characterized by huge internal tensions. 
These particular drops, with the form of a tear-drop tapering to a fine tail, are obtained when molten glass drips into cold water.
In contact with water, the glass cools immediately.

This extreme hardening causes enormous tensions in the glass drops that give rise to their particular properties, such as the ability to withstand hammer blows given to the bulbous part of the drop. Instead, even a small scratch on the "tail" results in the quick release of enormous amount of potential energy stored in the internal structure, causing fractures that propagate through the glass toward the head at such high speed that the entire structure explodes into a fine powder.

An examination of the shattering of Prince Rupert's Drops by the use of high speed video has revealed that the "crack front" which is initiated at the tail end propagates in a disintegrating drop within the tensile zone towards the drop's head at a very high speed [1.45–1.9 km/s (0.9–1.2 mi/s)]. 

Although the mechanism that underlies the glass tempering was not known before the twentieth century, the effect is instead known for centuries. In 1640, Prince Rupert of Bavaria brought to the attention of the King the discovery of those that are known since then as the "Prince Rupert's Drops." 

The drops were used as a joke: the King did to hold in the palm of your hand the drop from the part of the bulbous, then he broke the tail causing a small explosion that astounded the victim of the joke. 
It is not difficult produce them, but you must be cautious.

On 4 March 1660-61 "glass bubbles" were first introduced to a meeting of the Royal Society of London. Read the abstract relating to a General Colloquium from Professor Srinivasan Chandrasekar, Purdue University: http://www.physics.purdue.edu/colloq/99-00/chandrasekar.html

The drops were also immortalized in a verse of the Ballad of Gresham College (1663):
And that which makes their Fame ring louder,
With much adoe they shew'd the King
To make glasse Buttons turn to powder,
If off the[m] their tayles you doe but wring.
How this was donne by soe small Force
Did cost the Colledg a Month's discourse
Dorothy Stimson, Ballad of Gresham College.Scientists and Amateurs: A History of the Royal Society (1948) - pag. 59: 
http://books.google.it/books?id=cj8eAAAAIAAJ&q=%22To+make+glasse+Buttons+turn+to+powder%22&dq=%22To+make+glasse+Buttons+turn+to+powder%22&pgis=1

Watch:
Mystery of the Prince Rupert's Drop - Smarter Every Day 86 , a video demonstrating the creation, processes, explanation, and multiple high speed recordings of a Prince Rupert Drop.: Mystery of Prince Rupert's Drop at 130,000 fps - Smarter Every Day 86.
The animated gif was extracted from this video.

Watch also:
Video showing the making and the breaking of Prince Rupert's Drops from the Museum of Glass:
Prince Rupert's Drops!

Further reading
Popular Science article with video detailing Prince Rupert’s Drops: http://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2008-06/shattering-strongest-glass


#physics #scientific_curiosity #science #sciencesunday #scienceeveryday #scienceongoogleplus
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I *can* see the forest for the trees, but any given moment might find me admiring a tree.
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From a small town in Indiana (USA).
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I've had surgery four times with anaesthesia and once without. I recommend anaesthesia.
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