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James Kimbley
Works at Kimbley IT
Lives in Birmingham, United Kingdom
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James Kimbley

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If only Amazon Prime had Chromecast support!
 
Amazon nabs former Top Gear presenters for a new car show exclusive to Amazon Prime
Amazon has scored a major result with the news that it has signed up former Top Gear figurehead presenters Jeremy Clarkson, James May, and Richard Hammond to present a new car show to rival Top Gear.
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James Kimbley

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Why is Put in such a prat? 
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On the eve of Windows 10 here is a look back at the history of the start menu.
One of Windows 10's biggest "new" features has a pedigree that spans two decades.
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The new revelations of a deal do not come from a whistleblower or leaked reports, but are buried within 52,000 pages of documents declassified by the NSA itself this April and investigated by the BBC.
American and British intelligence used a secret relationship with the founder of a Swiss encryption company to help them spy during the Cold War, newly released documents analysed by the BBC reveal.
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This is a good change. Mobile Web editing was a terrible experience.
 
Google axes editing of Docs on mobile web, presenting install banners for multiple file types

Google Drive for the mobile web has always restricted editing to just Docs files — attempting to edit Sheets or Slides files required downloading the Google Drive app for iOS or Android. That changes today. No, you won’t be able to edit Sheets or Slides…
Google Drive for the mobile web has always restricted editing to just Docs files — attempting to edit Sheets or Slides files required downloading the Google Drive app for iOS or Android. That chang...
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Must of had some pretty serious nitro to do that.
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Nice Google Maps easter egg.
You've been driving for two hours, and you've got at least two more. You're tired of sitting behind the wheel and you want to stop and stretch your legs, b... by Cody Toombs in Applications, News, Videos
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James Kimbley

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Nice tip to clean up space on your HDD for anyone who's just upgraded to Windows 10.
 
Now that you've done the upgrade, do a little cleanup.
The Windows 10 update saves files from your previous installation so that you can revert back to it if you need to. Deleting those files can get you back up to 20 GB of disk space.
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I remember this from the days of Vista to 7 Upgrades :)
Also Windows 10 is great. Though Cortana works on my desktop not my laptop :/
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Good summary of the Virgin Galactic crash.
 
A fundamental principle of good engineering is that you design the whole system to function well, not just the part you're concentrating on. Most systems include humans as components -- as operators, maintainers, passengers, or even obstacles. And when you fail to take that seriously into account in your design, you make a fundamental design error which can have lethal consequences.

It appears that the cause of the SpaceShipTwo crash was precisely of this sort: the designers never considered the possibility that a particular switch might be flipped at an incorrect time. In this case, it was flipped only a few seconds too soon, at a speed of Mach 0.8 instead of Mach 1.4. (This under rocket power, where acceleration is fast) That caused the tail system to unlock too soon, be ripped free by acceleration, and destroy the spacecraft, killing the co-pilot and severely injuring the pilot.

Scaled Composites' design philosophy of "relying on human skill instead of computers" here reeks of test pilots' overconfidence: the pilots are so good that they would never make a mistake. But at these speeds, under these g-forces, under these stresses, and tested repeatedly, it's never hard for an error to happen.

There are a few design principles which apply here.

(1) It should not be easy to do something catastrophic. There are only a few circumstances under which it is safe for the feathers to unlock, for example, and those are easy to detect based on the flight profile; at any other time, the system should refuse to unlock them unless the operator gives a confirmatory "yes, I really mean that" signal.

(2) Mechanical tasks that can lead to disaster are a bad idea. Humans have limited bandwidth to process things: while our brain's vision center is enormously powerful, our conscious mind's ability to think through things works at language speed, a few ideas per second. Here, time was wasted with a human having to perform a basically mechanical task of unlocking a switch at a particular, precise time. This requires the human to pay attention, time something accurately, and flip a switch, at a time that they should be simply watching out for emergencies. Since the time of unlock is already known long before takeoff, a better design would be for the unlock to happen automatically at the right time -- unless the risks from having an automatic unlocker (perhaps due to a reliability issue, or having a complex part prone to failure) exceed the benefits of removing it.

What's important to learn from this accident is that this error isn't specific to that one mechanism: this is an approach which needs to be taken across the entire design of the system. Every single potential or scheduled human action needs to be reviewed in this way.

An excellent perspective on this comes from James Mahaffey's book Atomic Accidents, a catalogue of things that have gone horribly wrong. In the analysis, you see repeatedly that once designs progressed beyond the initial experimental "you're doing WHAT?!" stage, almost all accidents come from humans pushing the wrong button at the wrong time. 

Generally, good practice looks like:

(A) Have clear status indicators so that a human can tell, at a glance, the current status of the system, and if anything is in an anomalous state.

(B) Have "deep status" indicators that let a human understand the full state of some part of the system, so that if something is registering an anomaly, they can figure out what it is.

(C) Have a system of manual controls for the components. Then look at the flows of operation, and when there is a sequence which can be automated, build an automation system on top of those manual controls. (So that if automation fails or is incorrect for any reason, you can switch back to manual behavior) 

(D) The system's general behavior should be "run yourself on an autonomous schedule. When it looks like the situation may be going beyond the system's abilities to deal with on its own -- e.g., an anomaly whose mitigation isn't something that's been automated -- alert a human."

The job of humans is then to sit there and pay attention, both for any time when the system calls for help, and for any sign that the system may need to call for help and not realize it.

This wasn't about a lack of a backup system: this was about a fundamentally improper view of humans as a component of a crtiical system.
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Extract data via electromagnetic waves that computers naturally emit.
Researchers show that electromagnetic waves can be used to exchange data between an air-gapped computer and a phone.
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Feels like it's slowly dieing to me. Engagement has dropped massively this year. 
Google VP Bradley Horowitz says ending the requirement to use Google+ to engage with other Google products will allow the company to make a "slew of improvements" to the core social network.
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I'm just glad I have a Facebook alternative
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The single currency has many issues, the key one being that the European Central Bank’s one-size-fits-all monetary policy has failed
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Work
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Founder
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Cloud Computing, IT Service Management, Google Apps
Employment
  • Kimbley IT
    Founder, 2009 - present
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Male
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Chess Free
  • Motorsport Manager
  • Chess With Friends
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Providing Cloud Computing and speedy IT Support to Small Technology and Creative Businesses
Introduction
I follow Formula 1 closely and race in a number of  national karting championships in the UK. I also visit family in China quite often.

I am the Founder of Kimbley IT. We specialise in providing expert advice on Google Apps and IT Support to creative, green and technology based small business in Birmingham and the West Midlands. 
Bragging rights
I've advised The Gadget Show on Channel 5.
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Currently
Birmingham, United Kingdom
Previously
Guilin, China
The Japanese don't mess about when making miniature models. Really good few hours, worth going.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
It's very 1950's. Staff are nice and its an enjoyable experience. But, WiFi is limited to the lounge which is not really acceptable for a hotel these days.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Very nice food. The portions are smaller than other restaurants in the area but they turn out to be just the right amount. We were left very satisfied with the food.The only thing that made the experience less enjoyable was the restaurant manager asking if we'd like to add service to our bill before handing over the card payment machine for the pin to be entered. This is not a question that should ever be asked as it puts pressure on the client to make the payment. They should drop this practice.
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Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
Contacted Pete at PW Electrical based on the past reviews. Something must have changed at the company as it is no longer 5 start at all. Pete arranged to meet me onsite at a rental property so that he could have a look around and quote for the work. He promised to call the day before to make sure everything was OK and still going ahead. By the afternoon I'd not heard from Pete. Gave him a call and left a voicemail asking to call back if he could not meet. Otherwise I'd see him at the agreed time the following day. I arrived at the property. I waited for 25 minutes after the agreed time and Pete had not shown up. I called his mobile and was put through to answer machine. Left a message that I would be leaving in 5 minutes and to call me if he was on his way or could not make it. Never got a call back. It would seem Pete is unreliable and unprofessional and happy to waste other people's time. I'd advise avoiding P W Electrical.
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Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
115 reviews
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Not great. We stayed in a couple of traditional Japanese style hotels. This one was the biggest let down. It is right in the middle of the tourist area (so if priced higher). The staff don't really speak English but are friendly enough. However the food really was a let down - really tasteless - sadly the server also had really bad breath which didn't help in building an appetite for the food.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Really poor customer service. We purchased a new Oven from CDA - it was faulty upon arrival. CDA initially refused to replace it and insisted on sending an engineer out. Fully knowing what the model oven we had the engineer did not come with the correct parts and tried to botch a fix. As the engineer was signing of the job the problem (a noisy fan) returned. The engineer then filed a report saying he would return to fix the job when he had the required parts and that CDA would be incontact. No one from CDA made contact. In the end my Kitchen fitter had to chase the company up - who were still unwilling to replace a faulty oven instead insisting on sending another engineer out with a replacement fan. Considering this is a brand new oven we found this unacceptable and demanded a replacement. CDA refused. Luckily my kitchen fitter had a big order with CDA and cancelled the rest of the order. In under an hour the regional sales manager has contact my kitchen fitter to find out why the order had been cancelled. Once the problem was explained he arranged for a new oven to be delivered the next week and the old oven to be removed. If we had not had such a big order - we'd still be dealing with CDA's terrible customer service.
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Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
Needed a locks changed quickly. Where able to visit on the same day within 40 minutes of my call. Professional service and quickly got down to work.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago