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James Harris
Works at My Father's World
Attended Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design
Lives in Rolla, MO
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James Harris

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Sun Tzu said "All war is deception." Demacians disagree. While their enemies plot and scheme and maneuver, Demacian champions walk boldly into combat.

When bad things happen, it can be hard to know who's responsible. If Noxus or Zaun moves against you, you might never know about it until it's too late. Not so with Demacia. If Demacia decides you are a problem, you'll be able to tell by the ranks of gleaming plate mail, the blazing sunbursts of energy, and the armored champion charging your line shouting "DEMACIA!!" at the top of his lungs.

They're not much for subtlety. That's why I like them so much. Misdirection just isn't their style. They fight for justice; as far as they're concerned, any fight you don't win fair and square isn't a true victory anyway. Demacian battles are prosecuted with honor, discipline, and stubborn determination. It doesn't matter how long it takes, or what horrific machinations the enemy employs, or how much sacrifice is required--Demacia will keep coming and fighting and dying until they win. Justice is not for the faint of heart.

#LeagueOfLegends   #wallpaper  
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James Harris

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Interested in problem-solving? Interested in space exploration? This movie is going to be right up your alley.
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James Harris

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This is cool. Watch the world get better over time! Has lots of different datasets to explore.
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James Harris

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Brene Brown has a really good book on vulnerability and its power to shatter the barriers between us and happiness. The part that's speaking the most to me right now is page 145, where it talks about shadow comforts. These are things we're theoretically doing because they're fun, but they're not actually that fun--mainly they're just keeping us busy. They're a way to temporarily disconnect from the world around us, giving us a temporary reprieve from our worries. I think a little escapism once in a while can be a useful way to get some distance from a particularly taxing problem, but it's something that's easy to overuse. If you rely on it too much, you're disconnected and tuned-out from the world around you, and (as the book points out repeatedly) meaningful relationships with people are essential to joy and happiness. 

I'm sure each of you has your own comforts you turn to when you need to put the world on pause for a little while. Video games are one of mine. I would never say that video games have been a bad influence on my life--many of my fondest memories and deepest friendships have grown out of the shared play spaces that games provide. But just as games can bring people together, they can also isolate, depending on how they're used. Brene quotes another book called The Life Organizer, by Louden: "Shadow comforts can take any form. It's not what you do; it's why you do it that makes the difference. You can eat a piece of chocolate as a holy wafer of sweetness--a real comfort--or you can cram an entire chocolate bar into your mouth without even tasting it in a frantic attempt to soothe yourself--a shadow comfort. You can chat on message boards for half an hour and be energized by community and be ready to go back to work, or you can chat on message boards because you're avoiding talking to your partner about how angry he or she made you last night."

My gaming patterns have been pretty isolating recently. I'm going to make an effort to play with friends more. I'm going to play League of Legends less (since none of my close friends play it any more) and I'm going to re-subscribe to Star Wars: The Old Republic, since I have some friends who hang out there.
Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead - Kindle edition by Brene Brown. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead.
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I love this book, and learned much for myself when I read it... although I'm still working on applying, as some of it is really challenging to my old habits of thought. So glad to see you enjoying the book too!
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James Harris

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Don't be put off by the cutesy anime overtones. Seemingly everyone in this game wants you dead. The only way I was able to complete this was by starting a miniature wiki to keep track of the myriad threats to my life. It's a good thing the save-and-restore system is so robust--I guarantee you'll need it. Read the reviews for some free entertainment.
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James Harris

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You know what's natural? Hemlock, cobra venom, and infant mortality. I choose science!
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James Harris

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This is the clearest and most compelling case for space exploration I've yet found. Getting to Mars isn't a lark or a luxury--it's the most effective way to safeguard the human race.
One of life’s great leaps may be just around the corner.
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The whole article is worth reading, but for those short on time, here's the conclusion: http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/08/how-and-why-spacex-will-colonize-mars.html/5#future
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James Harris

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A thoughtful look at Windows 10's privacy settings, how they differ from the rest of the marketplace, and what you're getting in return.
Big data and machine learning are going to be used everywhere, even our operating systems.
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James Harris

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Talking with +Robin Harris the other day, I mentioned that I've been having some success with weight loss using a couple of apps on my phone. She asked for links, and I figured instead of using email I'd put them in public for the benefit of my friends.

Rather than eating a particular group of foods or relying on willpower, I've found the most decisive factor in weight loss to be hard data. I was shocked and amazed at the calorie counts of some of the foods I consumed regularly. By routinely logging my food, I'm getting a feel for how many calories various foods contain, and for how much a calorie is worth. This has enabled me to find foods I like that I can fill up on while maintaining a calorie deficit.

There are lots of calorie-tracking apps out there; the one I use is called Lose It. Here it is in the Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.fitnow.loseit&hl=en The interface is fun and reasonably easy to use. It syncs to their website, and you can enter your meals through your web browser when you'd rather use that than your phone. They push for you to sign up for their paid service harder than I'd like, but I can live with it. The most important thing is that they have a very large food database; pretty much anything you can buy in a grocery store will be already in the app, and the same is true for lots of restaurants. Anything that's not in the app, you can enter manually, just by looking at a nutrition label.

To optimize this system properly, you need to track the output as well as the input. Regular weigh-ins are important to make sure we're not just theorizing. Weigh-ins are tricky, though--they're an important measurement, but they have a lot of noise in them. Your weight fluctuates with your intake of water and outflow of waste, and that throws your weight measurement off your "true" weight, which is what we really care about. This is why you can seem to suddenly gain or lose a few pounds with absolutely no change in your routine. The way we control for this is by calculating a rolling average of our weight. This way we don't cheer when our weight drops 2 pounds and then wail when it goes back up to normal--we compare our weight to the average over the last week or so, not just to yesterday's weight. As long as the dots you put in are still pulling the line down instead of pulling it up, you're still losing weight!

Lose It has a weight tracker, but it doesn't support rolling averages, so instead I use Libra. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.cachapa.libra&hl=en It's a free app (ad-supported) that turns your weight measurements into a lovely little graph, complete with trend lines. This is where I get my motivation--whenever I feel body shame, I can look at the graph for indisputable proof that I'm making progress and an estimate backed by data for when I'll reach my goal. It helps a lot.

Anyone with questions, ask away!
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Thanks so much James! And I'm impressed with your progress! I needed some inspiration, and this helps.
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James Harris

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The Periodic Table of Storytelling will be included in this compendium of writing tools!
Greg Miller is raising funds for Miller's Compendium: a comprehensive writer's reference book on Kickstarter! "Miller's Compendium of Timeless Tools for the Modern Writer" is an encyclopedic catalog of writing resources in clickable e-book form.
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Congratulations!!! It definitely deserves to be there. 
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James Harris

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Just finished Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think. Excellent, important book. (Here's the last excerpt I posted: https://plus.google.com/+JamesHarrisDesign/posts/X9K97cUvxuT) After describing how the Watson supercomputer systematically destroyed its competitors on Jeopardy!, even at tasks requiring great breadth of insight and mastery of the English language, he writes:

///

I'll admit it: Watson scared the living heck out of me.

As I watched it deftly intuit puns, juggle millenia's worth of information, and tear through human opponents like some sort of bionic brain-shark, a technological dystopia unfolded in my grim imagination. This is it! We're finally doomed. I could imagine Watson-like AI slowly colonizing our world. Knowledge workers would be tossed out of their jobs. Shows like Jeopardy!--indeed, all feats of human intellectual legerdemain--would become irrelevant. And as we all started walking around with copies of Watson in our wearable computers, we'd get mentally lazier, relying on it to transactively retrieve every piece of knowledge, internalizing nothing, our minds echoing like empty hallways. Deep conversation would grind to a halt as we became ever more entranced with pulling celebrity trivia out of Watson, and eventually humans would devolve into a sort of meatspace buffer through which instances of Watson would basically just talk to each other. Doomed, I tell you.

Obviously, I don't really believe this dire scenario. But even for me, such dystopian predictions are easy to generate. Why is that? Among other things, doomsaying is emotionally self-protective: If you complain that today's technology is wrecking the culture, you can tell yourself you're a gimlet-eyed critic who isn't hoodwinked by high-tech trends and silly popular activities like social networking. You seem like someone who has a richer, deeper appreciation for the past and who stands above the triviality of today's life. Indeed, some clever experiments by Harvard's Teresa Amabile and others have found that when people hear negative, critical views, they regard them as inherently more intelligent than optimistic ones; when we're trying to seem smart to others, we tend to say critical, negative things. I suspect this is partly why so much high-brow tech punditry proceeds instinctively from the pessimistic view, and why we're told so often and so vehemently that today's thinking tools make us only shallow and narcissistic, that we ought to be ashamed for using them.

But as I've argued, this reflexively dystopian view is just as misleading as the giddy boosterism of Silicon Valley. Its nostalgia is false; it pretends these cultural prophecies of doom are somehow new and haven't occurred with metronomic regularity, and in nearly identical form, for centuries. And it ignores the many brilliant new ways we've harnessed new technologies, from the delightful and everyday (using funny hashtags to joke around with like-minded strangers worldwide) to the rare and august (collaborating on Fold.it to solve medical problems).

Understanding how to use new tools for thought requires not just a critical eye, but curiosity and experimentation. ... We'll truly figure out what Watson is for only when people begin using the software to make jokes, to play games, to hassle each other. ...

How should you respond when you get powerful new tools for finding answers?

Think of harder questions.
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Interesting comments, especially on our tendency to feel like negative comments are somehow smarter and more informed than positive ones...
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This is remix culture: Start with something great, then find something to add to it. Love it!
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In his circles
208 people
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829 people
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Collections James is following
Education
  • Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design
    Graphic Design, 2010 - 2013
  • Community College of the Air Force
    Computer Information Systems, 2006 - 2010
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking
Other names
DawnPaladin
Story
Tagline
I believe in stories.
Introduction
I travel the world learning things and solving problems. Right now I'm doing web design for a Christian homeschooling company in Rolla.

In my free time, I read books, play games, and make cool stuff on my computer.
Bragging rights
Raised by missionaries in the depths of Siberia; fixed computers among the shining towers of St. Petersburg and the hellish wastelands of Baghdad; been shot at by terrorists with rockets more than once.
Work
Occupation
Graphic & Web Design
Skills
Graphic design, computer geekery, storytelling.
Employment
  • My Father's World
    Designer & Web Developer, 2014 - present
  • US Air Force
    Senior Airman, 2006 - 2010
    Computer accountability, maintenance, and repair
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Rolla, MO
Previously
Denver, CO - Atlanta, GA - Sather Air Base, Baghdad - Tucson, AZ - Keesler AFB, Mississippi - Azusa, CA - St. Petersburg, Russia - Yakutsk, Russia - Khabarovsk, Russia - Boring, Oregon - Calgary, Alberta - Anchorage, AK - Virginia Beach, Virginia
James Harris's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Slack - Android Apps on Google Play
market.android.com

All your team communication in one place, instantly searchable, available wherever you go. That's Slack.* Real time messaging, file sharing,

Flight routes map demo | amCharts
www.amcharts.com

You can create animated, interactive flight routes map showing destinations of flights. You can add icons, bullets, texts on top of the map

Interactive JavaScript Maps | amCharts
www.amcharts.com

Interactive JavaScript maps for web sites and applications. Our HTML5 mapping library will meet needs of all web developers. Supports all mo

Lock Shy Layers Panel - Creative COW
f1.creativecow.net

Lock Shy Layers Panel. from Ridley Walker on May 13, 2013 at 3:26:47 pm. Link. Download Count: 29. Script for locking and unlocking shy laye

Front-end Front — Basically, front-end news
frontendfront.com

Front-end Front is a place where front-end developers can ask questions, share interesting links, and show their work to the rest of the com

Scott Gilbertson
arstechnica.com

Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis.

Designer News
www.designernews.co

Designer News is a community where design and technology professionals share interesting links and timely events.

A Complete Guide to Flexbox | CSS-Tricks
css-tricks.com

Background The Flexbox Layout (Flexible Box) module (currently a W3C Last Call Working Draft) aims at providing a more efficient way to lay

Divi 2.4 – Tons of New Features. More Control than Ever Before
davidwalsh.name

One problem that arrises when you use inline-block is that whitespace in HTML becomes visual space on screen. There are many to remove that

Days Left Widget - Android Apps on Google Play
market.android.com

Check out my latest game Escape from Space for all Jelly Bean (and onwards) devices! https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.leihw

Eloquent JavaScript
eloquentjavascript.net

This is a book about JavaScript, programming, and the wonders of the digital. You can read it online here, or get your own paperback copy of

The Time Zone Converter
www.thetimezoneconverter.com

The Time Zone Converter converts times instantly as you type. Convert between major world cities, countries and timezones in both directions

Online font converter
onlinefontconverter.com

converts fonts to/from: .dfont .eot .otf .pfb .pfm .suit .svg .ttf .pfa .bin .pt3 .ps .t42 .cff .afm .ttc, .pdf & .woff

Playing With The HTML5 range Slider Input
demosthenes.info

Using, transforming and adapting sliders across browsers

Sign in - Google Accounts
inbox.google.com

For your convenience, keep this checked. On shared devices, additional precautions are recommended. Learn more · Need help? Create an accoun

How to Batch Rename Files in Windows: 4 Ways to Rename Multiple Files
www.howtogeek.com

Windows comes with a variety of ways to rename multiples files at once from Windows Explorer, the Command Prompt, or PowerShell. Whether you

GroupMe - Android Apps on Google Play
market.android.com

GroupMe - the free, simple way to stay connected with those who matter most. Family. Roommates. Friends. Coworkers. Teams. Greek Life. Bands

Explorable Explanations
explorableexplanations.com

I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

Excellent service. I made a stupid mistake with regards to the service I requested, and they were very gracious about working with me.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
Lovely hair salon. Friendly and talkative owner who knows what she's doing. Great service, great price.
Public - 12 months ago
reviewed 12 months ago
When I first moved in at Terra Village, the management was very difficult and unpleasant to deal with. Happily, those people are gone and the new management is quite gracious and pleasant. The rates there are fairly good. One thing I like about it is that instead of charging "pet rent" (increasing the monthly cost of your rent for as long as you live there), they just ask for a one-time "pet deposit". If you plan an extended stay, this can save lots of money. The grounds are kept up pretty well, but my neighbors were often noisy. I wish the office was open longer and that I could place outgoing mail in a local mailbox instead of going down to the post office. But they do nice things like deep-cleaning everyone's carpets periodically, publishing a little monthly newsletter, and sometimes asking for feedback from their tenants. Overall this is a fairly nice little apartment complex. The location is really convenient, five minutes away from the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design that I attended, and a similar distance from the lovely Sloan's Lake community. It's not a deluxe place to live, but the prices are really good, the location is great, and the service has some nice little perks that make this an enjoyable stay.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Tasteless food. Too expensive.
Food: Poor - FairDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
18 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Lovely little vet clinic. Spotlessly clean and well-lit, with friendly and professional staff. They took care of my pet reasonably quickly, and the price was fair. Very glad to have such a nice clinic convenient to my home in St. James.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Love this place! Open 24 hours (the whole thing, not just the drive-thru), electrical outlets, and a fireplace! Great place to sit down with your laptop and work. They even gave me some free coffee after my first few purchases. Only thing that's missing is wi-fi. Great for all-night study sessions!
Food: Very GoodDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago