Profile

Cover photo
Jake Sharman
Works at The NBS, RIBA Enterprises
Attended Bellville High School
Lives in Sunderland, England
16,573 followers|3,261,821 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Pinned

Jake Sharman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Well, my sabbatical has come to an early end. 

The experience was fantastic. Since that post, I have completely withdrawn from the world and spent a luxurious few months in near-solitude. It's been healing and amazing... and highly conflict and stress-free.

I didn't watch or read the news. I didn't socialise. I only spoke when someone spoke to me first. I limited my correspondence to email, and then limited that to the three people who felt it important to stay in touch. I read a lot. I got through several series of programmes I'd been wanting to watch. I started doing yoga again. In every way that I could, I embraced silence and isolation. And I finally found the peace that had been missing for so long.

... and then someone amazing offered me a job. Or rather, a new lease on my career.

So, my sabbatical has come to an early end for practical reasons. But that's okay; it served its purpose well, and while I will miss the sweet silence of aloneness, I am very happy to see you all again.
 
On Sabbatical

For the past 10 years, I've relied on social media for most of my socialising and communication. My time on G+ in particular has been incredibly fulfilling, and I've met a lot of really great people in the 3.5 years that I've been here. 

But things change and I think, for me, it's time to step away—at least for awhile. My idea is that'll I've give myself a year off to reconnect with myself. Maybe without this... (beautiful, wonderful, glorious, time-consuming) crutch, I can finally finish mourning the losses that I've never recovered from, put them behind me for good, and learn to accept and embrace where my life's journey has taken me. Maybe, I can figure out how to forgive myself. Maybe—just maybe—I can even learn to be my own best friend again. 

Maybe.

Bright blessings to all of you who have been such an incredible part of my G+ experience. Thank you for allowing me to share my thoughts with you. Y'all take care, and maybe—just maybe—I'll see you again in 2016. 

Jake
View original post
52
hendro ciuwinto's profile photoJane deBond's profile photoChristine Bogart's profile photoJake Sharman's profile photo
65 comments
 
When I get a chance to breath, I want to post and tell y'all all about it.
Add a comment...

Jake Sharman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Eulogy from a Physicist
"One of the most glorious and accurately written appreciations of human life"

While, unlike +Amber Petchey,  I am very much lacking in romance, I do share her appreciation for raw facts. This piece by Aaron Freeman is the perfect illustration of how science is not the absence of beauty and wonder but the celebration of it. One simply could not wish for a more stirring eulogy.

Should I ever decide that I actually would like for there to be a funeral when I die, I would want the eulogy to be like this.
 
Some people think I'm a bit cold, that I lack romance - I disagree. I find something deeply beautiful in raw facts.

What's not to love about knowing that everything you are was forged in the heart of an ancient dying star - or the physicists eulogy? (In my opinion, one of the most glorious and accurately written appreciations of human life.)

"You want a physicist to speak at your funeral. You want the physicist to talk to your grieving family about the conservation of energy, so they will understand that your energy has not died. You want the physicist to remind your sobbing mother about the first law of thermodynamics; that no energy gets created in the universe, and none is destroyed. You want your mother to know that all your energy, every vibration, every Btu of heat, every wave of every particle that was her beloved child remains with her in this world. You want the physicist to tell your weeping father that amid energies of the cosmos, you gave as good as you got.

And at one point you'd hope that the physicist would step down from the pulpit and walk to your brokenhearted spouse there in the pew and tell him that all the photons that ever bounced off your face, all the particles whose paths were interrupted by your smile, by the touch of your hair, hundreds of trillions of particles, have raced off like children, their ways forever changed by you. And as your widow rocks in the arms of a loving family, may the physicist let her know that all the photons that bounced from you were gathered in the particle detectors that are her eyes, that those photons created within her constellations of electromagnetically charged neurons whose energy will go on forever.

And the physicist will remind the congregation of how much of all our energy is given off as heat. There may be a few fanning themselves with their programs as he says it. And he will tell them that the warmth that flowed through you in life is still here, still part of all that we are, even as we who mourn continue the heat of our own lives.

And you'll want the physicist to explain to those who loved you that they need not have faith; indeed, they should not have faith. Let them know that they can measure, that scientists have measured precisely the conservation of energy and found it accurate, verifiable and consistent across space and time. You can hope your family will examine the evidence and satisfy themselves that the science is sound and that they'll be comforted to know your energy's still around. According to the law of the conservation of energy, not a bit of you is gone;
you're just less orderly. Amen."
-Aaron Freeman
9 comments on original post
12
1
Amber Petchey's profile photoJake Sharman's profile photoMartin Golding's profile photoPandora Dream's profile photo
9 comments
 
My eulogy will be preceded by the decimation of my Scotch collection. Nothing that follows will be coherent.
Add a comment...

Jake Sharman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Carol and Daryl are guarding my election predictions.
24
Kathy P's profile photoJohn Mink's profile photoJake Sharman's profile photoSaMi Ch's profile photo
7 comments
SaMi Ch
 
HI
Add a comment...

Jake Sharman

Shared publicly  - 
 
On Sabbatical

For the past 10 years, I've relied on social media for most of my socialising and communication. My time on G+ in particular has been incredibly fulfilling, and I've met a lot of really great people in the 3.5 years that I've been here. 

But things change and I think, for me, it's time to step away—at least for awhile. My idea is that'll I've give myself a year off to reconnect with myself. Maybe without this... (beautiful, wonderful, glorious, time-consuming) crutch, I can finally finish mourning the losses that I've never recovered from, put them behind me for good, and learn to accept and embrace where my life's journey has taken me. Maybe, I can figure out how to forgive myself. Maybe—just maybe—I can even learn to be my own best friend again. 

Maybe.

Bright blessings to all of you who have been such an incredible part of my G+ experience. Thank you for allowing me to share my thoughts with you. Y'all take care, and maybe—just maybe—I'll see you again in 2016. 

Jake
90
7
Sergio Adino's profile photoJake Sharman's profile photo
Have her in circles
16,573 people
joe erse boss's profile photo
Vicky Buckley's profile photo
Naveed Ali's profile photo
Rio Budianto's profile photo
‫فؤاد القحطاني‬‎'s profile photo
Scott Fedor's profile photo
revanth sing's profile photo
Cat Beach's profile photo
Lyungsu's profile photo

Jake Sharman

Shared publicly  - 
 
The right to be let alone is indeed the beginning of all freedom. ~ William O. Douglas

I've always considered the "If you've got nothing to hide..." argument an erroneous one. Why? Because history teaches us that innocence is no protection against those who would mould the world to their liking by force.

Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government's purposes are beneficent. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding. ~ Louis D. Brandeis

Privacy is a protection from the unreasonable use of state and corporate power. But that is, in a sense, a secondary thing. In the first instance, privacy is the statement in words of a simple understanding, which belongs to the instinctive world rather than the formal one, that some things are the province of those who experience them and not naturally open to the scrutiny of others: courtship and love, with their emotional nakedness; the simple moments of family life; the appalling rawness of grief. That the state and other systems are precluded from snooping on these things is important – it is a strong barrier between the formal world and the hearth, extended or not – but at root privacy is a simple understanding: not everything belongs to everyone. ~ Nick Harkaway

The way things are supposed to work is that we're supposed to know virtually everything about what they [the government] do: that's why they're called public servants. They're supposed to know virtually nothing about what we do: that's why we're called private individuals.” ~ Glenn Greenwald


They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~ Benjamin Franklin
XPRIZE's competitions touch the furthest reaches of human achievement in fields like healthcare, oceanography and even space exploration. The organization is currently designing ...
19
6
Boris Borcic's profile photo謝予穎's profile photoIvan Pierre's profile photoHilmar Hoffmann's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Jake Sharman I agree trust is one of the biggest issues. and there have been times when that has been abused (although i would say we are better off in the UK than the US in those terms). 

There are some very real and true threats out there though that do support surveillance to a certain level.. it's about balance i guess. But yes the government is also quite happy to piggyback on those very real reasons to help them gain more info about us all should they want to.

Half of the trust problem is that as human beings we instinctively don't trust someone or something that is being 'secretive' or not telling us the whole story... that automatically indicates they have something to hide, deviousness etc, and this is even more so when that is coming from an authoritative or governing group - not to mention that to the most part also instinctive do not like being 'watched'. But unfortunately the very nature of surveillance for security/crime detection purposes relies on a certain amount of secrecy - or there is just no point. It is the national security equivalent of you telling your whole street what the code is to your new burglar alarm

I think it is sometimes worth differentiating between the term mass surveillance and being actively targeted/monitored. The first (which appears to be what ppl are most scared of) is little more than a blind (often automated) filtering system that picks up on defined red flags within a set type of data.. nobody has any interest in you until that flag pops up and then your only interesting enough until you are in 90% of cases showing to be false a positive. That is about it really. The ones that scrutinized further still, usually have good reason for being so.

God yes humans are fallible.. and you will even get the odd one that is a bad apple. But this is part of everything that we do, you can succumb to that every-time you step on a plane or get prescribed a drug in hospital. But from the areas i have work in the huge majority of the work is done to the highest degree and every precaution is taken. In regards to trust, and people 'snooping on you' i never really came across it - the sorts of people that are rank and file doing this sort of work see themselves as cross between  Bond & The Professionals - out catching bad guys types and are so focused on the real targets that you and me do not matter.. and even if we did, the likelihood if we did there would not be the resources to deal with us.

Laptops left on trains type incidents are actually exceptionally rare.. and if you are talking about your information such as perhaps a huge data bank somewhere that is holding your emails from the last 3 years, you have to ask if someone got those (and it wont just be yours, yours might be just one in 3 million users emails, remember what i said before about the word "mass") exactly what risk you are at? Mass surveillance is there to pick out those ppl that are not already known, but may present a risk... that is about it

It takes quite a lot of know how and resources to break into these kinds of places - and you have to ask who would spend that time and resource to do it?.. criminals? unlikely, not when they can probably just get your credit card details of your home computer far easier because you do not secure your home pc to anything like the same degree as a government secured data bank. Foreign governments? possibly, but again you have to wonder exactly what actual risk you are at from that to.

Regarding your question (and i agree, they are good ones) 

1.. that is quite subjective question, i think it would vary from person to person. For instance if you're a career criminal or terrorist you definitely want privacy laws to be tight as possible!

(it's always been ironic the bad ppl actually rely on the law to actually help them do what they do - which is effectively prey on vulnerable people, the vulnerability of which can actually be caused by what those public actually allow to happen in regards to security)

 What you might get in return you often do not get to hear about, or know about. Not just because of the whole secrecy thing but because it can be exceptionally hard to quantify deterrent or an event that was never allowed to escalate to an actual serious incident. 

2. You could ask that of all the information one willingly gives to the likes of FACEBOOK etc i guess. A I'm not sure how my complacency (whether it is false or not) might effect something like a criminal/terrorist incident happening - or for that matter some form of outrageous governmental devious plan happening.

Back to the trust issue i guess it comes down to one thing really for me... it's not so much i do not think i can trust the government with my info, or to do the right thing with it.. but more a matter of who do i trust most ?.. The police forces, security agencies, our government etc or terrorists, criminals, anarchists, mobsters etc.. ? Many would ague it's a close call lol.. but i think one does have just slightly better track record really.. We likely wouldn't even needing to have this discussion if it wasn't for the way in which the bad element of the world acted in the first place.

At the end of the day no matter how much we would all prefer our privacy to be more - errrm, private - we still expect the government to protect us from just about everything these days, they can't do that with their eyes shut - the flip-side being that many people should perhaps open their own eyes and perhaps take a bit more responsibility for their own lives/actions.

oh and don't even get me started on extremism! lol

so sorry about the length of the post, but its a bit of complex subject isn't it!
Add a comment...

Jake Sharman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Our deepest wounds surround our greatest gifts

It’s so easy to get lost in the quest for self-improvement. Every billboard seduces us with the vision of a happier, more successful life. I’m suggesting an opposite road to happiness. If we can name our own awkward, ardent gifts, and extricate them from the shame and wounds that keep them buried, we’ll find ourselves on a bullet train to deep, surprising, life-changing intimacy.

I'm not really interested in intimacy, but I do think that being able to name and embrace the gifts that are interwoven with our shame and wounds provides a type of inner power and level of self-esteem possibly not otherwise attainable.

Thoughts?
It's so easy to get lost in the quest for self-improvement. Every billboard seduces us with the vision of a happier, more successful life. Ken Page suggests an opposite road to happiness.
18
LD Williams's profile photoEarl Greer's profile photoAnowar Hossain's profile photoJoe Vanderwege's profile photo
27 comments
 
The phrase"a penny for your thoughts"ring a bell
Add a comment...

Jake Sharman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Excellent response by Mark Ruffalo:
 
Mark Ruffalo did an Ask Me Anything on reddit. I was really only interested in one question, and of course someone else asked it. The Hulk delivered.
31 comments on original post
45
1
Fergus Martin's profile photoAmber Petchey's profile photoJake Sharman's profile photoKerry Amburgy-Dickson (Kalex)'s profile photo
18 comments
 
heh. I keep reading your comment +Amber Petchey and wanting to +1 it again. So, here are another 10 +1s for you.
Add a comment...
Jake's Collections
People
Have her in circles
16,573 people
joe erse boss's profile photo
Vicky Buckley's profile photo
Naveed Ali's profile photo
Rio Budianto's profile photo
‫فؤاد القحطاني‬‎'s profile photo
Scott Fedor's profile photo
revanth sing's profile photo
Cat Beach's profile photo
Lyungsu's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Writer, Editor, Wordsmith
Employment
  • The NBS, RIBA Enterprises
    Technical Content Specialist, 2015 - present
    Part of the Information Services team responsible for the the maintenance and development of the Construction Information Service (CIS), an online product range that provides access to over 26,000 technical publications from key industry publishers. My role includes researching, developing, authoring and reviewing technical information and helping guide the look and feel of both new and existing products and publications.
  • Self-Employed
    Writer, Editor, 1997 - 2015
    Writing, scriptwriting and editing services for international, corporate and internet clients. Projects include technical publications, documentaries, corporate videos, articles, news stories, blogs, website content, proposals, presentations, papers, newsletters, handbooks, brochures, and other written communication projects for USA and UK-based clients.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Sunderland, England
Previously
Bellville, Texas - Tulsa, Oklahoma - Houston, Texas
Links
Other profiles
Story
Tagline
Gzalzi vaberzarita maaszi ~ Absurdity has become necessity
Introduction
“Loneliness is the poverty of self; solitude is richness of self.” May Sarton


PC Gamer, Browncoat, & Technical Content Specialist at The NBS, RIBA Enterprises

About me

A native Texan living in England, I am a writer who is well-versed in both British and American English. My skills include scriptwriting, article writing and editing, turning technical content into user-friendly material, and developing material for marketing and promotional campaigns. I also have extensive experience with editing scientific and academic works for publication, research and writing online content for SEO purposes, blogging (including ghost blogging), promotion through social networking, and creating templates and formatting documents in PowerPoint and Word. While my university studies focussed primarily on English literature, writing, and psychology, my education is ongoing. Always studying or researching something, I regularly participate in online university courses, with topics ranging from social science to world history.

Hobbies and interests

My hobbies include reading, writing poetry and fiction, photography, and PC and console gaming. I am also a huge science fiction fan. Quote Firefly, and I'll follow you anywhere.

Bragging rights
Being Texan-slash-British, I know all the best curse words.
Education
  • Bellville High School
  • San Marcos Baptist Academy
  • Oral Roberts University
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Other names
Jess/Dena
The review my husband wrote for Checked & Vetted sums it up for me: The Automatic Rollador Showroom, aka Rollador Shutters Shunderland, owned by Wayne Brooke, displays the Checked & Vetted logo on their website. However, they are not a member of Checked & Vetted. On the day that they were due to fit the roller shutter, they were over an hour late. It was clear from the start that they were under pressure to finish quickly. The fitters were incompetent, they used crowbars to remove things that could have simply been unscrewed, and one of them even managed to injure the other. They weren’t very happy that I was around; they wanted me to leave while they worked. They apparently had someone waiting to take my old door away, because it was gone before I could even tell them that I wanted to keep it. They didn’t ask me to quality check any of their work, although “you were okay with it on the day” became an all too familiar excuse for the atrocious customer service that followed. They signed off the work themselves. After they left, I noticed that the way the shutter was fitted was a security issue. I contacted Wayne (the owner) via the email address listed as a contact point on his website straight away and attached photos of the problem. He ignored my email, so I sent another two weeks later. This time, he responded with a promise that his fitters would come by. They never showed up and no one phoned to follow up. When we chased the company for a response, one of the fitters got defensive and blamed us for their failure to reply. According to him, they were under no obligation to monitor or respond to email or even make a phone call once they were made aware that there was an issue. He never apologised, and when asked about sorting the security problem, he defended the work and the only offer he made was to come down and explain why he thought the shutter was okay the way it was. We sought a second and third opinion and showed the photos. We were told that it was not okay, the roller shutter was compromised, and a repair was needed. At this point, another Rollador fitter offered an unacceptable solution. When we rejected that idea, the fitters washed their hands of the matter. By now, over a month had passed, and we still hadn’t heard from the owner. We had a professional from another company come to our home and take a look at the door. He confirmed that the shutter fit was faulty and informed us of an easy, cheap, acceptable solution. He explained that it would cost Rollador nothing in materials, and labour would be less than half an hour. When we proposed this repair to Wayne, we were met with a tirade followed by a refusal to do the work unless we paid extra for it. EDIT: After threatening them with small claims court, Wayne decided to repair the door at no cost to us.
• • •
Public - 3 weeks ago
reviewed 3 weeks ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map