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Jake Mannix
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Virtual tourism in Marseille?  Cool!
Channel the sounds and stories of #Marseille by choosing your own path through its back streets with Promenade Nocturne→ http://g.co/nightwalk
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3d interlocking spherical gear thingee.  2-cool!
Like the circles that you find ... in the spherical gears of your mind?

Well, admittedly that's a rather heavy handed mixing of an old song lyric and a separate yet-common turn of phrase, but the 3D-printed "Mechaneu v1" is a delight to see.

Note to self, when working out, heart rate at 189 is your bodies way of hinting that you should slow down a little.

On an unrelated note: does anyone know of a good way to use G+ to post selectively to "topics" which people can opt in to?  I think the answer is basically "no", but... if I'm going to start posting here, and I've got tech stuff, boring exercise stuff, personal stuff, and random newsy things... I don't know if all of those things are going to be interesting to all people.  

Back in the LiveJournal days, I would post everything friends-only, and set up subgroups I'd post to, and tell people about them so I could opt them into those lists.  That should work with Circles, but maybe there are pitfalls?

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St. Victor over the "sea" of the MuCem
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Le cabanon de Cézanne
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I've been out of academia a while, but it doesn't seem like its changed much. Industry is figuring out how to work with open source software, why can't academia get past the whole "write like nobody is meant to read this except the reviewers" mentality?
What would happen if academics weren't required to publish, and only wrote when they felt they had something to say? Well, that would be a lot like blogging.

Much less is said in blogs than in journals, at least in math and stat. But the quality of writing in blogs is far better -- blog posts are written with the intention of being read, not as a formal certificate of activity.

And blogs have true peer review. Unless a blog is really obscure, more than two or three people read each article. Maybe hundreds or thousands of people read each article. And they can comment publicly.

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The Minimum Wage Machine
Minimum Wage Machine
Blake Fall-Conroy, 2008-2010

This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like. Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour. This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York. 

This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary. Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank. A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank. This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.

// rapidly making its way around tumblr, found at SA's D&D

edit for reference:

The average worker earning minimum wage must work 130+ hours to afford rent in New York and California. 

http://takingnote.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/30/paying-rent-on-minimum-wage/
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What is it with social networks and the whole "real names" thing? It's the biggest invasion of privacy I've ever run into, frankly, because if I don't want people to know I'm a dog, kiss my ass.

Google, you get a big -1 from me for following Facebook on this one. Even LinkedIn doesn't pursue people with pseudonymous profiles, unless they're perceived to be attempting to impersonate someone.

Greetings, new people!

Back in the days of LiveJournal (the original asymmetric-follow social network), people would introduce themselves soon after following someone, telling me where they found me, who they are, just generally say "Hi!", and possibly mention why they're following me:

* "I'd like you to spill the beans on behind-the-scenes Twitter stuff!",
* "I <3 physics and like to read when you look back on your good-old-physics days",
* "I follow anyone with kitten pictures <link to greasemonkey script to search g+ for kitten pictures while browsing>",
* "This was a very insightful post, you should come find great deals on replica watches on this awesome new website <broken link>"

So spill the beans, peepz, say hello, convince me you're not a bot!
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