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Jake Mannix
Works at Twitter
Attended Stanford University
Lives in Seattle, WA
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Jake Mannix

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Virtual tourism in Marseille?  Cool!
 
Channel the sounds and stories of #Marseille by choosing your own path through its back streets with Promenade Nocturne→ http://g.co/nightwalk
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Jake Mannix

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St. Victor over the "sea" of the MuCem
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Jake Mannix

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I've been out of academia a while, but it doesn't seem like its changed much. Industry is figuring out how to work with open source software, why can't academia get past the whole "write like nobody is meant to read this except the reviewers" mentality?
 
What would happen if academics weren't required to publish, and only wrote when they felt they had something to say? Well, that would be a lot like blogging.

Much less is said in blogs than in journals, at least in math and stat. But the quality of writing in blogs is far better -- blog posts are written with the intention of being read, not as a formal certificate of activity.

And blogs have true peer review. Unless a blog is really obscure, more than two or three people read each article. Maybe hundreds or thousands of people read each article. And they can comment publicly.
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Sarah Wait Zaranek's profile photoJake Mannix's profile photoAzucarin Porcine's profile photo
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I've had a private office for so long that I'm not sure what I would do without one.
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What is it with social networks and the whole "real names" thing? It's the biggest invasion of privacy I've ever run into, frankly, because if I don't want people to know I'm a dog, kiss my ass.

Google, you get a big -1 from me for following Facebook on this one. Even LinkedIn doesn't pursue people with pseudonymous profiles, unless they're perceived to be attempting to impersonate someone.
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He is real.
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Jake Mannix

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Greetings, new people!

Back in the days of LiveJournal (the original asymmetric-follow social network), people would introduce themselves soon after following someone, telling me where they found me, who they are, just generally say "Hi!", and possibly mention why they're following me:

* "I'd like you to spill the beans on behind-the-scenes Twitter stuff!",
* "I <3 physics and like to read when you look back on your good-old-physics days",
* "I follow anyone with kitten pictures <link to greasemonkey script to search g+ for kitten pictures while browsing>",
* "This was a very insightful post, you should come find great deals on replica watches on this awesome new website <broken link>"

So spill the beans, peepz, say hello, convince me you're not a bot!
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So... cold... need... brains...
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Jake Mannix

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Andriy Burkov originally shared:
 
In 1987 Apple Computer held a competition called Project 2000. Apple asked student research teams to submit papers detailing what the computing technology of the year 2000 would look like. In early 1988 Steve Wozniak, Alvin Toffler and Ray Bradbury, among others, sat on the judge's panel. The winning team was from the University of Illinois with their paper called Tablet: The Personal Computer of the Year 2000. Below is an excerpt and various images from the paper. You can read the paper in its entirety here <http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19880008883_1988008883.pdf> or here <http://www.stephenwolfram.com/publications/articles/computing/88-tablet/2/text.html>.

Read the entire paper with pictures, it's fascinating:

"Our machine will have the same dimensions as a standard notebook. It will look like an 8"x11" monolith from the movie 2001, and be reminiscent of the Dynabook. This rectangular slab will weigh but a few pounds, and have no buttons or knobs to play with. The front surface will be a touch-sensitive display screen and will blink to life upon touching two corners."

"It takes only a little more courage to predict a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver on our machine, either as a clip-on or a built-in component. GPS [6] is a satellite-based positioning system which enables objects to determine their location in the world to within a few meters, or even closer if the U.S. Department of Defense allows it. By plugging in the Rand McNally Road Atlas LaserCard and taking our computer for a drive, it can provide us with an ideal route between two points by considering the possible routes, the time of day, and current traffic patterns (using an on-line data base, discussed below). The capacity of a LaserCard is such that we can store all the parking spaces in the state and have the best spots near that French restaurant in the city read to us through a speech synthesizer."

"In addition to communicating with peripherals via infrared, we can also talk to other computers. Each machine can continually broadcast personal facts that users may wish the world to know: perhaps their name, image, interests, and marital status for openers. Setting a machine in ``get acquainted mode'' will display the location of all machines in the vicinity and list the names of their owners. While sitting on plane the user can scope the crowd, and maybe find someone interesting to talk to during the trip. Just imagine turning this loose in a singles club!"

"Another peripheral that will be extremely popular will be a lapel-sized video camera. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) make inexpensive and rugged solid-state cameras. As with LCD, CCD production methods are similar to VLSI, and prices will follow the corresponding learning curve. The upshot is that camera devices will be so inexpensive most people will be able to afford one. They will be useful for recording meetings, self-recorded e-mail video for instruction and personal communication, and as a digitizing device for printed documents that remain in the year 2000. The notion of digitizing documents is important because a substantial number of printed documents will remain, such as old books and new contracts. After digitization, the image can be processed to cleanup and recognize the text."

http://paleo-future.blogspot.com/2007/05/project-2000-apple-computer-1988.html
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3d interlocking spherical gear thingee.  2-cool!
 
Like the circles that you find ... in the spherical gears of your mind?

Well, admittedly that's a rather heavy handed mixing of an old song lyric and a separate yet-common turn of phrase, but the 3D-printed "Mechaneu v1" is a delight to see.
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Note to self, when working out, heart rate at 189 is your bodies way of hinting that you should slow down a little.

On an unrelated note: does anyone know of a good way to use G+ to post selectively to "topics" which people can opt in to?  I think the answer is basically "no", but... if I'm going to start posting here, and I've got tech stuff, boring exercise stuff, personal stuff, and random newsy things... I don't know if all of those things are going to be interesting to all people.  

Back in the LiveJournal days, I would post everything friends-only, and set up subgroups I'd post to, and tell people about them so I could opt them into those lists.  That should work with Circles, but maybe there are pitfalls?
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You mean adding people to the circles?   Removing should be easy: people need to just ask, understanding that no offense is taken when someone realizes they don't give a rat's ass about my fitness / tech / whatever posts.  

But then adding should work the same way: back in LJ days, if I found myself posting to a filtered group a lot, I'd make a public (or friends-only) post saying, "Hey, I've been posting a lot to #foo, comment here and I'll add you", unless the topic was super personal, in which case I'd just post such an invite to a much smaller group of people (so I don't have to say, "er, no I'm not adding you to that group, it's too personal for you").  

But I guess that's sort of where it gets annoying: the process of deciding who to invite to a filter/group/circle can take some time / effort.
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Jake Mannix

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Le cabanon de Cézanne
 ·  Translate
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Cezanne had work done?  What? Chin implant?
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Jake Mannix

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The Minimum Wage Machine
 
Minimum Wage Machine
Blake Fall-Conroy, 2008-2010

This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like. Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour. This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York. 

This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary. Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank. A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank. This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.

// rapidly making its way around tumblr, found at SA's D&D

edit for reference:

The average worker earning minimum wage must work 130+ hours to afford rent in New York and California. 

http://takingnote.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/30/paying-rent-on-minimum-wage/
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Hey, does anyone have a browser extension which turns all of these "+username" into "@username"?

You can't try and trick me into thinking some other character means "the following characters until whitespace are a user-account", oh mighty Google!

Or should I submit this "CSS typo" to google+ feedback? :P
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I actually find +username to be a heckuva lot easier to read than @username.
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Story
Tagline
TBD
Introduction
I've made more social network profiles than I can count now.  Don't have the energy to write another one.  See that list of links to the right?  

  • LinkedIn will tell you about how I make $, now and in the past (and where I went to school, etc).  
  • Twitter you'll hear me drone on about mostly technical stuff, in tiny snippets.  
  • Facebook I keep mostly private for my family and old friends.  
  • Quora you can see me answer questions mostly about physics, as it turns out.
If that doesn't give you a good picture of who I am... then you're probably as lazy as I am and can't be bothered to look through it very much.  And that, is ----------> ok.
Bragging rights
Have indeed survived high school. Have a preschool-aged daughter and a teenage stepson, and two dogs. Do these give me "bragging rights"? I have grey hair in my beard. *That* gives me braggin' rights!
Education
  • Stanford University
    Physics
  • University of Washington
    Math/Physics
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    Math/Physics
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Computer guy. See LinkedIn profile for details. It'll be kept more up-to-date than this text field.
Employment
  • Twitter
    Tech Lead, User Search, 2010 - present
  • Linkedin
    Principal SDE, 2008 - 2010
  • Jobster
  • Pluggd
  • Boeing
  • Centeris
  • Realogic
  • Aventail
  • RealNetworks
  • Stanford University
  • University of Washington
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Seattle, WA
Previously
Boston, MA - San Francisco, CA - Mountain View, CA - Santa Cruz, CA