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Jacob Zimmerman
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I'm about to start a campaign with a bunch of world hopping, so a set skill list wouldn't work the greatest for my players who will come from different worlds.

So I came up with a different skills system:
To start with, you get 4 "good" skills. Each of these skills is come up by the player and can give you one of three spreads:
* a +1, +2, and +3 in the same "category" of skill, getting more specific with each plus
* a +1 and three +2s in the same "category", with the +2s being different specializations, about as specific as a +3 would normally be
or
* a +2 in a broad skill

Plus, they get 2 more +1 skills (at any specialization level, but going broad would generally be better) and 2 skills at -1 or -2, depending on specialization

The idea is to allow the players to specialize or broaden their skill set a bit

On top of the Skills, there's something like FAE's approaches that stack with the skills.
These "approaches" are inspired by D&D Ability Scores. They're separated into Physical, Mental, and Social, and each has a Forceful, Finesse, and Toughness ability. They are:
Strength, Agility, and Fortitude
Intelligence, Imagination, and Willpower
Presence, Wit, and Reputation

Ability scores have a minimum of -2 and maximum of +2.
Your strongest set (Physical, Mental, or Social) of abilities gets a total of +2 to distribute.

Your medium set gets +1 to distribute..

Your weakest set gets -1 to distribute..

This allows for doing a point buy system where the player only has to focus on three things at a time, reducing the trouble of providing too many options. Meanwhile, you can still get a +2 in each set if distributed correctly or you can make it all 0s and 1s (with a -1), or whatever.

The Forceful, Finesse, and Toughness ability scores are used differently, too, so there isn't just a surface level difference.

First of all, the Toughness scores are used to determine the amount of Stress in each category (amounts not yet decided). Secondly, Toughness scores can only be used - if the player can justify it - with the Defense action or Overcome Obstacle action. When Defending with a Toughness ability, you can choose to take the hit. When you do this, then the total is resolved where the instigator simply takes their score and skill total with at minimum of +0 and goes against your Toughness and skill total. Obviously, Aspects can be invoked on both sides as well. This represents the super tough character who has to be hit hard enough before they'll feel it.

Next, Forceful and Finesse scores act as opposites. When using them, you can choose to go all out with them. When you go all out with a Forceful ability, you get a -1 to the roll, but if it's successful or a tie, then you get a +2 to the effect. When you go all out with a Finesse ability, you get a +1 to the roll, but if it's successful or a tie, you get a -2 to the effect (minimum of a tie). If the target chooses to match an all-out Forceful with an all-out Forceful, a tie stays a tie. If the target chooses to take the hit from an all-out Forceful, then you get +1. If the target chooses to take the hit from an all-out Finesse, then you get a -1. All-Out must be declared before the defender states how they're defending.



So, can I get some thoughts on what people think about this? Is it too many new mechanics? Too many character creation options? Too many play-time options? Does it seem relatively balanced between Forceful, Finesse, and Toughness? Obviously, Mental and Social "battles" will need to be utilized sufficiently, or else they'll get lousy scores, but the separating the point buy into chunks also prevents them from setting all the Social ones to -2 and all the Physical ones to +2 just because they think the GM won't ever use the Social ones.

I think overall that it will tend toward slightly higher numbers on average (obviously, players will tend to choose their best stuff whenever possible, which can get up has high as +5) compared to vanilla rules, but that can be compensated for with bigger numbers on the opposition.

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Making Descriptors that act as specialized properties can be tricky, especially when it comes to storing the data the the property controls. I should know, I literally wrote the book. Looking at how other languages do it - especially Kotlin's Delegated Properties - I felt that Python could use a system that works more like that.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2016/08/13/instance-level-properties-in-python/

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Making Descriptors that act as specialized properties can be tricky, especially when it comes to storing the data the the property controls. I should know, I literally wrote the book. Looking at how other languages do it - especially Kotlin's Delegated Properties - I felt that Python could use a system that works more like that.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2016/08/13/instance-level-properties-in-python/

Post has attachment
Making Descriptors that act as specialized properties can be tricky, especially when it comes to storing the data the the property controls. I should know, I literally wrote the book. Looking at how other languages do it - especially Kotlin's Delegated Properties - I felt that Python could use a system that works more like that.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2016/08/13/instance-level-properties-in-python/

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Let's look at another potentially confusing part of Python's boolean system: the ability to string comparison operators.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/string-python-comparisons-along/

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Let's look at another potentially confusing part of Python's boolean system: the ability to string comparison operators.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/string-python-comparisons-along/

Post has attachment
Let's look at another potentially confusing part of Python's boolean system: the ability to string comparison operators.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/string-python-comparisons-along/

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