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J. Steven York
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Lives in Coastal Oregon
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J. Steven York

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Joss Whedon's Top Ten Tips On Writing

Seems about right.

#writing   #writingtips   #writerslife   #gettingitdone   #josswhedon  
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J. Steven York

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Could be, could be..by why now, so close together in time? Saber rattling?
Texas and Kansas sightings have unveiled two different Black Projects. As we have already reported here, on Mar. 10, 2014 Steve Douglass and Dean Muskett took the photographs of three mysterious pl...
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J. Steven York

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Happy Birthday Hubble!!

The amazing +Hubble Space Telescope was launched 24 years ago aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. Just shy of a quarter of a decade, the international team that operates #Hubble  has uncovered a brand new Universe that we never thought possible!

Even now, we're able to use gravitational lenses caused by dark matter of galaxy clusters to look further back in space and time! The project is called +Frontier Fields and I totally recommend you look into it!

Have you wished Hubble a happy birthday yet?

#Hubble   #Space   #Astronomy   #ScienceEveryday   #HappyBirthdayHubble  
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J. Steven York

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NASA James Webb Space Telescope Mission Trailer
The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. Launch is planned for 2018. The Webb Telescope will be the premier observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. It will study every phase in the history of our Universe, ranging from the first luminous glows after the Big Bang, to the formation of solar systems capable of supporting life on planets like Earth, to the evolution of our own Solar System.

Considered the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, the telescope was named after former NASA administrator, James Webb in September 2002.

Learn more about JWST at: 
http://www.stsci.edu/jwst
http://webbtelescope.org/webb_telescope/

Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

+James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA   #Space   #Astronomy #JamesWebb #Telescope   #JWST #Infrared #VisibleLight
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J. Steven York

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Will be talking to the (hopefully) new lawn guy in a bit. Too allergic to grass to even open a window while somebody is cutting the stuff.
 
It all makes so much sense now: http://j.mp/1lLkXIp
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I cannot comprehend how some say they like the smell of cut grass. Makes me sneeze. Hail, fellow sufferer!
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Have him in circles
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J. Steven York

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Saturn certainly has some oddball moons and astronomers think they're close to explaining how a weird feature formed on one of them. New 3D maps are giving scientists an idea of how Iapetus' strange moons actually formed.
Saturn certainly has some oddball moons and astronomers think they're close to explaining how a weird feature formed on one of them. New 3D maps are giving scientists an idea of how Iapetus' strange moons actually formed.
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Extraordinary!  Astronomers discover protoplanetary disks around five stars by reviewing the Mikulski Archive of the Hubble Space Telescope

"(Phys.org) —Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have applied a new image processing technique to obtain near-infrared scattered light photos of five disks observed around young stars in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes database. These disks are telltale evidence for newly formed planets.

If astronomers initially miss something in their review of data, they can make new discoveries by revisiting earlier data with new image processing techniques, thanks to the wealth of information stored in the Hubble data archive. This is what Rémi Soummer, of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md., and his team recently did while on a hunt for hidden Hubble treasures.

The stars in question initially were targeted with Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) based on unusual heat signatures obtained from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the Infrared Astronomical Satellite that flew in 1983. The previous data provided interesting clues that dusty disks could exist around these stars. Small dust particles in the disks might scatter light and therefore make the disks visible. But when Hubble first viewed the stars between 1999 and 2006, no disks were detected in the NICMOS pictures."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-04-astronomical-forensics-uncover-planetary-disks.html#jCp

The study: "Five Debris Disks Newly Revealed in Scattered Light from the HST NICMOS Archive," Rémi Soummer et al. Preprint: arxiv.org/abs/1404.5614

Image: The two images at top reveal debris disks around young stars uncovered in archival images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The illustration beneath each image depicts the orientation of the debris disks. Credit: NASA/ESA, R. Soummer, Ann Feild (STScI)
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Confidence operators LOVE aspiring writers.
 
Turns out that James Straus, the guy I outed yesterday as a fake TV writer,  is a convicted conman. What a surprise. http://www.leegoldberg.com/james-strauss-fake-tv-writer-revealed-as-convicted-swindler/
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Have him in circles
3,896 people
David Brin's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Author of Mystery, Steampunk, Fantasy, and Science Fiction
Skills
Writer, thinker, observer, maker of things both aesthetic and functional
Employment
  • Writer
    1975 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
I think, I dream, sometimes I write it down. People seem to enjoy it when I do. www.YorkWriters.com
Introduction
(Check out my "Panorama Beach" Florida mystery series, and my "Clockwork Cowboy" steampunk western series, plus other work, at your favorite book or ebook vendor...)

I tell stories.  I'm not a writer.  That's secondary.  I tell stories, and I can tell them in may forms.  Sure, mainly I write prose fiction, novels and short stories, but I could have made movies, or computer games, or shoot photo-cartoons using action figures (and in fact, I've done all those things too.)  It's all storytelling to me.

I am fascinated by the world around me.  I love science, technology, and the way they fit in with the world of people and emotions,

In particular, I have, since I was in infant, been fascinated by space exploration, and I'm a keen observer and commentator of those efforts to this day.  I hoped I'd live to see us land on Mars.  Now I'm just hoping my grand-kids might see it, or something as profound.  

But I see signs of the long log-jam breaking, of new light that might get us off this lovely little ball of rock that we take for granted as our eternal home, and that excites me.

Science, tech, and the human equation, those things are frequently the subjects of my stories, but not always.  I love characters: the quirky, twisted, fascinating possibilities of human existence.  Give me a couple good characters in an interesting setting, and I can run all day without a Big Idea in sight. 

I can be cynical, and I am always sarcastic, but I still believe in the future.  I still believe in truth, justice, and the American ideal.  I believe we can be better than we are.  I believe someday we will be.  I believe in heroes, because they remind us what we could be, if we only tried a little harder.

My wife, Christina F. York tells stories too.  She's written science fiction, fantasy, and romance, but these days she mostly writes mysteries under the names Christy Evans and Christy Fifield, with the second book in her cozy mystery novel series about to hit print.

Two writers, several cats, and a house by the sea.  Now that's an adventure.  Let me tell you the story...

#writer #mystery #space #sciencefiction #fantasy #steampunk #spaceenterprise #future #engineering #makers
Bragging rights
National-best-selling author of over a dozen published books and many short stories.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Coastal Oregon
Previously
Chancellor, Alabama - Eugene, Oregon - Seattle, WA - Los Angeles, CA - Vista, CA - Escondido, CA - Hurst, TX - Pensacola, FL - Radcliffe, Kentucky - Renton, WA - Des Moines, WA - Kirkland, WA - Redmond, WA - Seattle, WA
Everything is good and prices are reasonable. Run by a professional diver who knows where the good local fish is (though quality and selection will depend on what is available). Check the specials white-board, as there may be something fresher and tastier than the standard cod and halibut available (fresh rock-fish is my favorite). Recommended for take-out as the dining room is small and not especially comfortable. Food is cooked to order and the kitchen is small, so service can be slow when they're backed up, but generally worth the wait. Definitely the best take-out fish on this part of the coast (tourist favorite Mo's is vastly over-rated). Only the lack of better indoor dining prevents me from giving this five stars.
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Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
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