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J. Steven York
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Lives in Coastal Oregon
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J. Steven York

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It's one of the dark marks of the U.S. Government in the 20th century — a complete willingness to expose unwitting citizens to dangerous substances in the name of scientific advancement. It happened with the Tuskegee syphilis…
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@NinjaMicWZ @meakoopa you've got a point, the answer was right there in front of our eyes all along. thechrishaley. 1m1 minute ago. thechrishaley @thechrishaley. @meakoopa @kenlowery Truth. Sorry, Twitter is taking too long to load. Try again ...
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J. Steven York

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This is a great demonstration in which a simple desktop device is used to propel a normal ping-pong ball with enough force to punch completely through an aluminum drink can!

It's interesting to note that this demonstrates some of the principles of Elon Musk's proposed Hyperloop transportation system. Like the Hyperloop, this involves a sealed tube from which most of the air has been removed by a vacuum pump. It's sealed at each in with a thin sheet of mylar plastic.

The mylar at the back of the tube is punctured, allowing atmospheric pressure to push the ball through the tube like a piston. But what's important here is that while it has normal pressure behind it, the ball has very little air in front of it, and THAT is what allows it to gain such speed and energy. It's traveling nearly at the speed of sound as it exits the tube and though the ball is light and draggy, it has a LOT of energy at this point.

In Hyperloop, the vehicle will have a partial vacuum in front AND behind, and propulsion will be by another method such as electromagnetic propulsion. But what's important is that the vehicle/ball can reach and maintain great speeds because it has little or no air in front of it.

In the Hyperloop, there's still SOME air in the tube, about the same as the surface of mars, and at its higher speeds, this is still a problem. Air, thin as it is, piles up in front of the vehicle and slows it down. Musk's answer was to use a battery powered fan in the nose to pump the air past the vehicle. To some extent, this fan takes (or at least shares, with the pumps that depressurize the tubes) the role of the vacuum pump in the vacuum cannon.

Anyway, this would make a great classroom demonstration that could lead into discussions of physics, engineering, math and even the Hyperloop itself.

#science #teaching #hyperloop #elonmusk #physics 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoG9Dc1YVLY
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"  SpaceX is planning to be back in action two weeks later with a planned Feb. 24 launch of its upgraded Falcon 9 booster. The rocket will carry SES-9 communications satellite for SES S.A. of Luxembourg.  "
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Some more independently sourced publishing figures, these for comics, and much to my surprise, if these numbers are to be believed, comic sales are, if not booming, then on a good growth curve (last January's numbers were skewed by the release of the new Star Wars comic, which shipped in the Lootcrate subscription box service, inflating sales.

#comics   #publishing   #marvelcomics   #dccomics  
http://blog.comichron.com/2016/02/january-2016-comics-sales-estimates.html
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+Kristine Kathryn Rusch Forgot to tag you on this.
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"  One industry official familiar with the SES-9 mission said Hawthorne, California-based SpaceX has not abandoned hope of recovering the first stage after a landing on an offshore platform positioned for the mission. But the chances of success are much less given the launch trajectory agreed to with SES to reduce the time to arrival at its operating position.   "
SES says its planned Feb. 24 launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 Full Thrust rocket likely will need to skip an attempted recovery of the rocket’s first stage in order to place the 5,300-kilogram SES-9 satelite into the targeted orbit.
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And this is better than every Michel Bay movie ever made...
 
A closer look at what makes this Optimus Prime cake actually transform
Here's a closer look at the platform that makes this Optimus Prime Cake actually transform (plus tips to make your own).
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--"We're in this factory transformation to go from building six or eight [rocket cores] a year to about 18. By the end of this year, we should be at over 30 cores per year," President Gwynne Shotwell told a Federal Aviation Administration commercial space conference last week.--

'Think about this. SpaceX is hoping to quickly moving into reusing its rocket cores. We don't know how many times SpaceX hopes to reuse these, or how may times will be practical in the near term, but just for argument, let's suppose each core will, on average, be reused five times. So that means production of 150 core USES per year. That's a lot of launches, even with Falcon Heavy, which will use three cores (and in which recovering the center core is going to be especially challenging because of its altitude, speed, and distance from launch site).

The question is, what are all those launches FOR? Think about it. That's about one Falcon Heavy launch a week. It's a Falcon 9 launch every two and a half days! Or, twenty Falcon Heavy Launches and 90 Falcon 9 launches, 110 total, or an average of one launch every three and a third days. SpaceX will soon have three launch pads (it seems like it will be a while before they're launching in Texas). That's one launch per pad every ten days. Yeah, that seems just barely doable. Or say thirty Falcon Heavys, and Sixty Falcon 9s. That's 90 launches total, or about one every four days, or every 12 days per pad. That's more credible yet. Still pretty damned amazing, but...

 Does SpaceX think the launch market will expand that much if prices come down even more? Do they think their superior technology is going to allow them to take over the world launch market? Or are they looking forward to Mars pathfinder missions? Falcon Heavy is probably too small to mount an effective manned Mars mission, but you could do some impressive unmanned stuff. Maybe the "Mars Greenhouse" that gave Musk the idea for SpaceX in the first place? Or maybe prospector missions to look for resources and potential base/colony sites?

It's also possible that this rate of core production will only go on for a few years, and that it's a way of ramping up to build their next generation "super-booster," either the rumored Mars Colonial Explorer, or an interim "Falcon Super-heavy" built around the Raptor engine and a new, larger, core. These would use the larger production capacity, but of course, roll out at a much lower production rate.

#spacex   #falconheavy   #space   #mars  
http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-spacex-rocket-set-for-next-flight-as-company-boosts-production/3182885.html
SpaceX is boosting production of its Falcon 9 rockets to handle more than $8 billion of business for NASA and commercial companies
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The Ancient Minion and the Penguin meet at last! With the Penguin, part of the joke is always how did he do what you’ve seen or heard that he’s done. In this case, the secondary joke is…
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Coastal Oregon
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Chancellor, Alabama - Eugene, Oregon - Seattle, WA - Los Angeles, CA - Vista, CA - Escondido, CA - Hurst, TX - Pensacola, FL - Radcliffe, Kentucky - Renton, WA - Des Moines, WA - Kirkland, WA - Redmond, WA - Seattle, WA
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I think, I dream, sometimes I write it down. People seem to enjoy it when I do. www.YorkWriters.com
Introduction
(Check out my "Panorama Beach" Florida mystery series, and my "Clockwork Cowboy" steampunk western series, plus other work, at your favorite book or ebook vendor...)

I tell stories.  I'm not a writer.  That's secondary.  I tell stories, and I can tell them in may forms.  Sure, mainly I write prose fiction, novels and short stories, but I could have made movies, or computer games, or shoot photo-cartoons using action figures (and in fact, I've done all those things too.)  It's all storytelling to me.

I am fascinated by the world around me.  I love science, technology, and the way they fit in with the world of people and emotions,

In particular, I have, since I was in infant, been fascinated by space exploration, and I'm a keen observer and commentator of those efforts to this day.  I hoped I'd live to see us land on Mars.  Now I'm just hoping my grand-kids might see it, or something as profound.  

But I see signs of the long log-jam breaking, of new light that might get us off this lovely little ball of rock that we take for granted as our eternal home, and that excites me.

Science, tech, and the human equation, those things are frequently the subjects of my stories, but not always.  I love characters: the quirky, twisted, fascinating possibilities of human existence.  Give me a couple good characters in an interesting setting, and I can run all day without a Big Idea in sight. 

I can be cynical, and I am always sarcastic, but I still believe in the future.  I still believe in truth, justice, and the American ideal.  I believe we can be better than we are.  I believe someday we will be.  I believe in heroes, because they remind us what we could be, if we only tried a little harder.

My wife, Christina F. York tells stories too.  She's written science fiction, fantasy, and romance, but these days she mostly writes mysteries under the names Christy Evans and Christy Fifield, with the second book in her cozy mystery novel series about to hit print.

Two writers, several cats, and a house by the sea.  Now that's an adventure.  Let me tell you the story...

#writer #mystery #space #sciencefiction #fantasy #steampunk #spaceenterprise #future #engineering #makers
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National-best-selling author of over a dozen published books and many short stories.
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Author of Mystery, Steampunk, Fantasy, and Science Fiction
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Writer, thinker, observer, maker of things both aesthetic and functional
Employment
  • National best-selling Writer
    1975 - present
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Male
Everything is good and prices are reasonable. Run by a professional diver who knows where the good local fish is (though quality and selection will depend on what is available). Check the specials white-board, as there may be something fresher and tastier than the standard cod and halibut available (fresh rock-fish is my favorite). Recommended for take-out as the dining room is small and not especially comfortable. Food is cooked to order and the kitchen is small, so service can be slow when they're backed up, but generally worth the wait. Definitely the best take-out fish on this part of the coast (tourist favorite Mo's is vastly over-rated). Only the lack of better indoor dining prevents me from giving this five stars.
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