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J. Steven York
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Lives in Coastal Oregon
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J. Steven York

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This isn't the good and free thing people think it is."I don't care so I'm not doing anything" is not a good answer. More later.when I'm not on the road.
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J. Steven York

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AVIATR Titan Airplane Mission Concept
The AVIATR Titan airplane mission concept is a proposed one-year mission to explore Saturn's giant moon Titan.
 
This is an artist's concept of the proposed AVIATR Titan Airplane flying over a chain of bright terrain mountains with dark fluvially eroded intermountain plains.
 
This image was created using Blender3d and a background image of terrestrial terrain that is thought similar one of Titan terrain environments. The terrestrial background was created from images taken out of an airplane window and manipulated in Photoshop.
 
Image Credit & Copyright: Mike Malaska

#Titan #Saturn #Space #Airplane #Robotic #Artist #CGI #Exploration
#Engineering #Experimental #Research
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J. Steven York

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With so much going on in every episode of #Arrow, it can be tough to catch everything...and tonight's all-new episode is no exception. Here are a few things to watch out for: http://bit.ly/1nc6IzX
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J. Steven York

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Full X-Men: Days of Future Past Trailer Finally Lets Mutants Loose

ok ... this trailer is pretty kick ass!

( Full Story / Trailer - http://goo.gl/gLGvAM )

#MarvelComics   #Xmen   #XmenDaysOfFuturePast   #Movies  
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Have him in circles
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J. Steven York

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Six Degrees of Isaac Newton

There is a hexagonal cloud pattern at the north pole of Saturn.  It was first discovered by Voyager in 1981, and was still there when Cassini arrived at Saturn in 2006.  So it seems the pattern has been stable for more than 30 years. There’s been a great deal of debate about just how such a stable geometric shape could form in Saturn’s clouds, but it turns out the solution is surprisingly simple, and it traces back to some early experiments of Newton.

Although it seems unusual, the effect is fairly common in fluid motion, and has been observed in similar phenomena such as hurricanes.  It turns out to be due to an interaction between two regions of fluids moving at different speeds, which produces a kind of resonance between them.  The effect has been recreated in the lab by having a spinning ring in the center of a cylinder of water.

It’s interesting that this effect can be seen in what is basically a rotating bucket of water, but it goes to show that sometimes a simple experiment can lead to surprising results.

Isaac Newton performed a similar experiment, and it puzzled him as well.  He was interested in the aspects of rotation, specifically why the surface of water becomes concave when it’s in a rotating bucket.  The answer might seem obvious, simply that rotating water tends to fling to the outside due to a centrifugal force, but it isn’t so simple.  In Newtonian physics, motion is relative to other objects.  So if you argue that it is simply due to the spin of the bucket, what is the spin relative to?

Newton thought the experiment demonstrated that there is an absolute frame of reference.  Basically a fixed and universal reference frame against which all motion can be measured.  Thus, the bucket rotates relative to this universal frame, thus the water becomes concave.

In the 1800s, Ernst Mach argued against Newton’s absolute frame.  He claimed that Newton’s conclusion was wrong because the bucket was rotating relative to the Earth, and relative to other objects in the universe.  Thus one did not need an absolute frame of reference to account for rotation.  This argument in part motivated Einstein in his development of general relativity.

Of course Mach is perhaps more famous for the Mach number, which is the ratio of an object’s speed to the speed of sound within a medium. This number is an important factor in fluid mechanics.

The type of fluid mechanics that produces a hexagon on Saturn.

Image: NASA
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With Season 2 debuting Saturday, here's 5 reasons you should catch up on the awesome Orphan Black http://go.ign.com/1jKFb59
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I watched the first 2 episodes but hated the main characters.  Someone has leant me the first season and I've watched about the first 5 episodes, still not appealing.

On the points:
1.  Yeah, she does do multiple characters pretty well.  Unlike a certain star of Dollhouse.
2.  Is an interesting part of the show, but a bad description of it.
3.  Hardly new or surprising.
4.  Hardly new or surprising.
5.  Hardly new or surprising.

It doesn't have to be new or surprising, but these aren't much of a selling point if other shows do it.
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J. Steven York

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With so much going on in every episode of #Arrow, it can be tough to catch everything...and tonight's all-new episode is no exception. Here are a few things to watch out for: http://bit.ly/1nc6IzX
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From last November: Sequencing the Genome of the Passenger Pigeon
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People
Have him in circles
3,892 people
David Brin's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Author of Mystery, Steampunk, Fantasy, and Science Fiction
Skills
Writer, thinker, observer, maker of things both aesthetic and functional
Employment
  • Writer
    1975 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
I think, I dream, sometimes I write it down. People seem to enjoy it when I do. www.YorkWriters.com
Introduction
(Check out my "Panorama Beach" Florida mystery series, and my "Clockwork Cowboy" steampunk western series, plus other work, at your favorite book or ebook vendor...)

I tell stories.  I'm not a writer.  That's secondary.  I tell stories, and I can tell them in may forms.  Sure, mainly I write prose fiction, novels and short stories, but I could have made movies, or computer games, or shoot photo-cartoons using action figures (and in fact, I've done all those things too.)  It's all storytelling to me.

I am fascinated by the world around me.  I love science, technology, and the way they fit in with the world of people and emotions,

In particular, I have, since I was in infant, been fascinated by space exploration, and I'm a keen observer and commentator of those efforts to this day.  I hoped I'd live to see us land on Mars.  Now I'm just hoping my grand-kids might see it, or something as profound.  

But I see signs of the long log-jam breaking, of new light that might get us off this lovely little ball of rock that we take for granted as our eternal home, and that excites me.

Science, tech, and the human equation, those things are frequently the subjects of my stories, but not always.  I love characters: the quirky, twisted, fascinating possibilities of human existence.  Give me a couple good characters in an interesting setting, and I can run all day without a Big Idea in sight. 

I can be cynical, and I am always sarcastic, but I still believe in the future.  I still believe in truth, justice, and the American ideal.  I believe we can be better than we are.  I believe someday we will be.  I believe in heroes, because they remind us what we could be, if we only tried a little harder.

My wife, Christina F. York tells stories too.  She's written science fiction, fantasy, and romance, but these days she mostly writes mysteries under the names Christy Evans and Christy Fifield, with the second book in her cozy mystery novel series about to hit print.

Two writers, several cats, and a house by the sea.  Now that's an adventure.  Let me tell you the story...

#writer #mystery #space #sciencefiction #fantasy #steampunk #spaceenterprise #future #engineering #makers
Bragging rights
National-best-selling author of over a dozen published books and many short stories.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Coastal Oregon
Previously
Chancellor, Alabama - Eugene, Oregon - Seattle, WA - Los Angeles, CA - Vista, CA - Escondido, CA - Hurst, TX - Pensacola, FL - Radcliffe, Kentucky - Renton, WA - Des Moines, WA - Kirkland, WA - Redmond, WA - Seattle, WA
Everything is good and prices are reasonable. Run by a professional diver who knows where the good local fish is (though quality and selection will depend on what is available). Check the specials white-board, as there may be something fresher and tastier than the standard cod and halibut available (fresh rock-fish is my favorite). Recommended for take-out as the dining room is small and not especially comfortable. Food is cooked to order and the kitchen is small, so service can be slow when they're backed up, but generally worth the wait. Definitely the best take-out fish on this part of the coast (tourist favorite Mo's is vastly over-rated). Only the lack of better indoor dining prevents me from giving this five stars.
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Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
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