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J. Steven York
Works at National best-selling Writer
Lives in Coastal Oregon
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J. Steven York

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Actually, this is from "Devil Girl from Mars" (1954), another wonderfully bad film.
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C S Lie: Crime Scene Exaggeration
FBI, Justice Department for first time acknowledge that hair examiners gave flawed testimony for decades.
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Good thing there's no death penalty....
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BB-8 is the newest, and cutest, droid to join the Star Wars universe. But when this little guy makes his debut in Star Wars: The Force Awakens later this year, it won't be as CGI, but a as real robot. So how does it work? We've got some guesses.
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Yes, it is. Do you think it's simple gravity? Because some angles...
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This is why writing (or filming) historical fiction, even (maybe even especially) recent history, is so hard.  Even having lived through it, it's hard to accurately portray a world without mobile phones, computers, color television, desegregation, lattes on every street-corner, or no-smoking zones (even in places like hospitals, laboratories, or airplanes).  Figuring out when when a million now-common things came into use, much less common knowledge, in a given place, can be a huge challenge.
 
"It has been a staple of New York (not to mention newsrooms) for so long that it is hard to imagine a time when pizza needed an introduction. But that’s what it got on Sept. 20, 1944 — at a time when Italy was full of American troops who were acquiring a taste for the pies. Note the rare use of the plural 'pizze':"

I am reminded of hearing of an old Ellery Queen novel where "spaghetti" got the "exotic foreign word gets italicized" treatment.
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I sometimes think about the foods I routinely eat today and how exotic they would have seemed to me when I was 14.
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1963 Interview. I never had an opportunity to meet Boris. People I've met who knew him tell me that he was sweet and generous to the core. A fine man, indeed.
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J. Steven York

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Make your own Raspberry Pi Weather Station from scratch, complete with all the bells and whistles.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Complete-DIY-Raspberry-Pi-Weather-Station-with-Sof/
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Okay, I'm trying to stay clear of the Hugo nonsense, and mostly, I will, but I was a bit puzzled and shocked by the omission of "The Martian," based on subject matter, style, and the fact (yes, it was one of the few science fiction books I read last year) that it was GOOD. 

But one of the commentators points out that it was ineligible, or at least widely thought to be ineligible, based on the earlier, indie-published version of the book.

Which to me only points out how nonsensical and out-of-touch such an annual "best-book" or "best-story" award is with the current state of publishing.  Publication dates, or even what constitutes "published," is very difficult to define or determine for individual works, even those (as with "The Martian") that are eventually published by major publishers in print form, the trail getting there is increasingly muddy. 

And as with "The Martian," any attempt to define a workable system is simply going to leave out what are obviously worthy works, therefore rendering the award irrelevant.

 In so many respects, the Hugos are an award largely devoted to the future which is hopelessly mired in the past, and that's a rather pathetic thing.

Maybe it's time to call the whole thing off, or at least, replace it with an award that casts a broader net, both in terms of form and chronology, so that more good work (and good creators of work) gets acknowledged.

I can already hear the cries of, "but you're diluting the importance of the Hugos! News flash: The Hugos really haven't been that important to anyone outside a very small circle for a long time. They have essentially no commercial value (the days when "Hugo winner" on a cover sold books are long past, most readers have no idea what the award is) with books, and likely never had any in regards to movies or television.

At best, the Hugos are (or at least should be) a gesture saying, "here's some warm recognition from a few of your close friends and supporters."  But what they really are now is a bunch of angry pissing in the same bird-bath and calling it a hurricane.

I wouldn't miss that, and after a year or two, I don't think anybody else would either.
 
"In other words, of the 16 written fiction nominees on Torgerson's slate, 11 - more than two-thirds - had not actually been nominated by anyone in the crowd-sourced discussion from which, we are told, the slate emerged."
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This is exactly what I think on the subject. It's all political and Traditionally Published nonsense now. As a fan of the genre, I really don't care about the Hugos anymore. I read and loved The Martian and knew instantly it would not be nominated. I'm sure the Andy is laughing all the way to the bank. Especially after selling the film rights. 
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"It has been a staple of New York (not to mention newsrooms) for so long that it is hard to imagine a time when pizza needed an introduction. But that’s what it got on Sept. 20, 1944 — at a time when Italy was full of American troops who were acquiring a taste for the pies. Note the rare use of the plural 'pizze':"

I am reminded of hearing of an old Ellery Queen novel where "spaghetti" got the "exotic foreign word gets italicized" treatment.
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1963 Interview. I never had an opportunity to meet Boris. People I've met who knew him tell me that he was sweet and generous to the core. A fine man, indeed.
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If you didn't like "The Last Man on Earth," you might like this take on the material better. I haven't seen it in many years, but it was surprisingly enjoyable last time I did.
 
Looking for something to watch tonight? Here's a great piece of B-movie gold. 
'Night of the Comet' is the So-Cal 'Night of the Living Dead'
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Night of the Comet is pretty fun. Catherine Mary Stewart is truly the queen of the B's. 
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Work
Occupation
Author of Mystery, Steampunk, Fantasy, and Science Fiction
Skills
Writer, thinker, observer, maker of things both aesthetic and functional
Employment
  • National best-selling Writer
    1975 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
I think, I dream, sometimes I write it down. People seem to enjoy it when I do. www.YorkWriters.com
Introduction
(Check out my "Panorama Beach" Florida mystery series, and my "Clockwork Cowboy" steampunk western series, plus other work, at your favorite book or ebook vendor...)

I tell stories.  I'm not a writer.  That's secondary.  I tell stories, and I can tell them in may forms.  Sure, mainly I write prose fiction, novels and short stories, but I could have made movies, or computer games, or shoot photo-cartoons using action figures (and in fact, I've done all those things too.)  It's all storytelling to me.

I am fascinated by the world around me.  I love science, technology, and the way they fit in with the world of people and emotions,

In particular, I have, since I was in infant, been fascinated by space exploration, and I'm a keen observer and commentator of those efforts to this day.  I hoped I'd live to see us land on Mars.  Now I'm just hoping my grand-kids might see it, or something as profound.  

But I see signs of the long log-jam breaking, of new light that might get us off this lovely little ball of rock that we take for granted as our eternal home, and that excites me.

Science, tech, and the human equation, those things are frequently the subjects of my stories, but not always.  I love characters: the quirky, twisted, fascinating possibilities of human existence.  Give me a couple good characters in an interesting setting, and I can run all day without a Big Idea in sight. 

I can be cynical, and I am always sarcastic, but I still believe in the future.  I still believe in truth, justice, and the American ideal.  I believe we can be better than we are.  I believe someday we will be.  I believe in heroes, because they remind us what we could be, if we only tried a little harder.

My wife, Christina F. York tells stories too.  She's written science fiction, fantasy, and romance, but these days she mostly writes mysteries under the names Christy Evans and Christy Fifield, with the second book in her cozy mystery novel series about to hit print.

Two writers, several cats, and a house by the sea.  Now that's an adventure.  Let me tell you the story...

#writer #mystery #space #sciencefiction #fantasy #steampunk #spaceenterprise #future #engineering #makers
Bragging rights
National-best-selling author of over a dozen published books and many short stories.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Coastal Oregon
Previously
Chancellor, Alabama - Eugene, Oregon - Seattle, WA - Los Angeles, CA - Vista, CA - Escondido, CA - Hurst, TX - Pensacola, FL - Radcliffe, Kentucky - Renton, WA - Des Moines, WA - Kirkland, WA - Redmond, WA - Seattle, WA
Everything is good and prices are reasonable. Run by a professional diver who knows where the good local fish is (though quality and selection will depend on what is available). Check the specials white-board, as there may be something fresher and tastier than the standard cod and halibut available (fresh rock-fish is my favorite). Recommended for take-out as the dining room is small and not especially comfortable. Food is cooked to order and the kitchen is small, so service can be slow when they're backed up, but generally worth the wait. Definitely the best take-out fish on this part of the coast (tourist favorite Mo's is vastly over-rated). Only the lack of better indoor dining prevents me from giving this five stars.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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