Profile

Cover photo
J. Dale Himebaugh
Works at Retired
Attends School of Hard Knocks
Lives in San Antonio, TX 78223
157 followers|211,195 views
AboutPosts

Stream

 
Posted this to WWPD Bolt Action forum today about the Airborne rules that Warlord just released.

"The newest newsletter from Warlord has been released and they have included a set of rules for the use of Airborne Operations. These rules administer the delivery of Airborne and Glider troops of the various nations to the battlefield for inclusion in the game.

Here they have asked for the opinion of their readers of the rules. I think the rules are in general a good start and only miss the mark in one state, which I will explain from my perspective.

My only complain regarding these otherwise well presented set of rules is the manipulation of the markers for the drop by the opposing player either 45 degrees clockwise or counter-clockwise. Why does Warlord feel that in the pursuit of some sort of fairness that they give the opposing player some control over something that they have absolutely no control over whatsoever? It seems to be a continuing quest by Warlord Games to inject a measure of fairness in the game of a war that was never fair to begin with. It is sort of like the fairness of shooting machineguns at troops hanging under silk canopies on nylon shrouds as they descend helplessly at 35 miles per hour? Perhaps because if it hadn't been for the Russians and the Americans, the county oud have been speaking German as their prime language. (Maybe a little harsh?)

Someone needs to let Warlord Games know that "War is not Fair!" Given the opportunity, I will acheve a 3- or 4-1 ratio of superiority over my opponent. I'll try to surprise him if possible. If he is in a bunker, I'll use a flamethrower to neutralize him. If he is in a flammable Sherman tank, I am going to shoot a high velocity 75mm or better yet, an 88mm round at him and I'll keep shooting until the tank burns so it can't be recovered. And yes, I like games like this and trying to win them. 

An alternate form of airborne deployment would be a number of paper squares marked with the weapons type or the troops rank (BAR, SMG, LT., SGT., Flamethrower, Etc.) and place them in line on a ruler. Then holding it at a preset distance over the playing field determined by a die roll of 3 dice in inches, turn over the ruler and allow the squares to flutter to the playing surface. Troops may only fire defensively until they are formed into a minimum small (2 Man) unit (historically called an LGP - a Little Group of Paratroopers, which they were specifically trained for raising hell at).

I do like the paper airplane rules for the gliders, replacing them with Glider models when the paper airplanes are on the board, You get a little control, like a pilot would, not an opposing player (there's that Warlord concept of fairness again). If they hit a pole, tree, a building or other terrain feature, use the Landing Impact Table.

Bronco_6"
1
Geek Ken's profile photoJ. Dale Himebaugh's profile photo
4 comments
 
I dislike the opponent having anything influencing things that they don't have control over. There should be randomness in Airborne and Glider drops. That's the reality of the operations.
Add a comment...
 
Hex 20.16 A Keep controls the hex of approximately 31 square miles. Mounted troops can ride from the keep to anywhere in the hex in a days time. More details to be posted soon on this thread. 
7
Michael Prescott's profile photoJ. Dale Himebaugh's profile photoDoyle Tavener's profile photo
3 comments
 
+J. Dale Himebaugh, this is an excellent map, now we just need to know more about it! Who controls the keep? What is the keep's relationship to the small port? 

I would love to see encounter charts, and most importantly, a strong adventure hook for players. What ruin dot the mountains of the interior? Is there rebellion brewing in the port town? Are the dwarves about to buy mercenaries? etc. 
Add a comment...
 
Here are the pictures that I promised. I used the dip method and am happy with my results. Close up they don't look quite so spectacular. But on the tabletop. they look great and I am very happy with the results. Many years ago, an artist friend of mine, Gary Haggerty, used this very same technique, and I always wanted to try it but was afraid to and I am now a convert to his way of thinking, Go for the effect and the way they look . Don't worry about the individual detail on war-game figures.
8
Justin Borges's profile photo
 
That's a very good motto to live by, especially when you need to paint masses of figures.
Add a comment...
 
The first snow of the winter season had fallen and Earlgard looked like a fairy castle coated with a white layer of frosting covering the buildings throughout the town, coating the shop stalls with a blanket of white. Towns p...
1
Add a comment...
 
Have been running a three year campaign but would like to observe for tips and tricks. Let me know if it's OK and when you plan to meet up.
1
J. Dale Himebaugh's profile photoSteven Donaldson's profile photo
3 comments
 
Posted the video. Check it out if you want. It was the first of many. An Intro session
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
157 people
Mike Davis's profile photo
Ethel Grace Delacruz's profile photo
Shane O'hUid's profile photo
& Publishing Group's profile photo
Gary Allgeier's profile photo
Chuck Greene's profile photo
Fantasy Grounds's profile photo
Benoist Poiré's profile photo
Paul Ingram's profile photo
 
Woo Hoo! 20.16! I have no idea what it is or where it is yet but going now to look it up and start coggitating on the critters and the land Within the hex.
1
1
J. Dale Himebaugh's profile photo
 
OK! 20.16 is a coastal hex with mountains, excellent for building a good farming civilization and a few demi-human races. Perhaps a Gnomish community or something like that. Can't wait to get the thinking cap on and to get going with the blank canvas.
Add a comment...
 
J. Dale Himebaugh originally shared:
 
I'll take a hex, any hex with water on it, for a specific race. P!ease and Thank you.
1
Milton Murphy's profile photoErik Tenkar's profile photo
2 comments
 
what he said ;)
Add a comment...
 
Finished my American forces today and after 35 years of painting, used the Strong tone Dip technique on them. The scary part is that my wife said my figures, which are Warlord plastic 28mm, look better than the Westwind metal figures that I have along side them. She supports me getting more plastic figures. I'll be posting some photos tomorrow.
3
J. Dale Himebaugh's profile photoNick Riggs's profile photo
3 comments
 
Just got my copy of Tank War! for Bolt Action as well.
Add a comment...

J. Dale Himebaugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Opposition Makes Ready For The Duel
 The beeswax dripped
slowly down the side of the candle's cylinder, the inferior
workmanship of the candle showed as the candle burned unevenly and
the wick sputtered slightly, a result of imperfections in the wick
that remained when the body of the candle ...
1

J. Dale Himebaugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
OK. So here we go. At the danger of offending many of the technical heads who inhabit this forum, I have always wondered (and would like it if the experts could explain to me) why there are so many options for so many different type of every possible sword, knife, axe, and other chopping, slashing, and stabbing thingie yet there are only 4 options for a bow type with what I assume are simple arrows for simple heads when even a relative rookie archer but fairly learned medieval and ancient not to mention several South Asian and Asian cultures historian such as I know that there are a myriad variety of arrowheads for all types of uses and designs for cutting rope, starting fires, sending messages, penetrating armor such as plate, chain mail, padded gambesons, leather, laminar, quilted, studded, laming horses, sending messages and any number of other types of uses. 

What about normal flight arrows for range versus heavier and longer war arrows to improve the penetration? How about bodkin points versus bladed points to cause more sever fleshy wounds? I can accept that I can make up the rules to add these types of arrows and bows to the game but can tell me why Steve Jackson and Sean Punch didn't include these in the rules or in any of these editions or did they just not know and decided to skip these? (And don't even get me started on the lethality of slings!)
1
 
OK. So here we go. At the danger of offending many of the technical heads who inhabit this forum, I have always wondered (and would like it if the experts could explain to me) why there are so many options for so many different type of every possible sword, knife, axe, and other chopping, slashing, and stabbing thingie yet there are only 4 options for a bow type with what I assume are simple arrows for simple heads when even a relative rookie archer but fairly learned medieval and ancient not to mention several South Asian and Asian cultures historian such as I know that there are a myriad variety of arrowheads for all types of uses and designs for cutting rope, starting fires, sending messages, penetrating armor such as plate, chain mail, padded gambesons, leather, laminar, quilted, studded, laming horses, sending messages and any number of other types of uses. 

What about normal flight arrows for range versus heavier and longer war arrows to improve the penetration? How about bodkin points versus bladed points to cause more sever fleshy wounds? I can accept that I can make up the rules to add these types of arrows and bows to the game but can tell me why Steve Jackson and Sean Punch didn't include these in the rules or in any of these editions or did they just not know and decided to skip these? (And don't even get me started on the lethality of slings!)
1
1
Douglas Cole's profile photoPeter V. Dell'Orto's profile photoMichael Wolf's profile photoJ. Dale Himebaugh's profile photo
8 comments
 
People have mentioned Low Tech, in addition to a lot of Eastern and Ancient bows, more arrows than you'll ever want to use, some grim rules for realistic archery.
Martial Arts has some nice heroic techniques that make Ranger-styled characters more effective. Double-shotting and Rope-cutting and the like. I'd consider it almost a must-have for any Bowyer character.
Add a comment...

J. Dale Himebaugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
**
 The Story so far …. The party is in
Earlgard, one of the northern city states above the border of
Asselin. The city states are independent and proud, noble and free,
and exert their dominance over the lands and forests proudly,
independent, knowing that th...
 The Story so far …. The party is in Earlgard, one of the northern city states above the border of Asselin. The city states are independent and proud, noble and free, and exert their dominance over the lands and forests pr...
1
People
Have him in circles
157 people
Mike Davis's profile photo
Ethel Grace Delacruz's profile photo
Shane O'hUid's profile photo
& Publishing Group's profile photo
Gary Allgeier's profile photo
Chuck Greene's profile photo
Fantasy Grounds's profile photo
Benoist Poiré's profile photo
Paul Ingram's profile photo
Education
  • School of Hard Knocks
    1956 - present
  • School of Life, School of Hard Knocks, US Army, French Foreign Legion
    1956
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Bronco
Story
Tagline
I'm an Aquarian, slippery when wet.
Introduction
Playing GURPS and CROSSFIRE/INCOMING Vietnam skirmish on Roll20. 

Heavily medicated for your protection.
Bragging rights
A good shot but don't always know who or what.
Work
Occupation
Living History, Peddle Antique Quilts, Study The Alamo and Its History
Skills
Great Game Master, Dreamer, Conjurer, Invenor
Employment
  • Retired
    Lay About and Nar Do Well, 2009 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
San Antonio, TX 78223
Previously
Simi Valley, CA - Northridge, Los Angeles, CA - Frazier Park, Ca - Taft,Ca - Waco, TX - Bryan, Tx - Bangor, Me - Kolwezi, The Congo - Calvi, Corsica - Aubergne, France
Links