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Ishmael Ahmed
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Ishmael Ahmed

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Was Tolkien an IT guy???
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“An Open Letter to Lester Holt” @deray https://medium.com/@deray/an-open-letter-to-lester-holt-7a5d89f9601

Some decent, thoughts and a good question.
What I know is that a in the end what a President is capable is dependent on Congress. It's up to us to not only choose a candidate, but also support then by making sure they have a Congress to support them.
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Here's a meta-truth about the future: it's going to be vastly more complex and bewildering than the past or the present.

Every aspect of human culture used to have to fit in a space of human heads with some externalisation; books, other simple media. Now, every single aspect of our lives is all of that minus the constraints of geography plus the internet. The goddamn internet :-)

Technology (or equivalently culture) proceeds as a function of population density. That's some kind of network function; how many minds are connected, how densely are they connected, how supported are they by tooling, how supported are they by the cultural gestalt. But what you're really talking about is, what level of memetic complexity can the system support?

Adding the internet to culture has lifted a ceiling on maximum memetic complexity, by orders of magnitude. It's the cultural equivalent of humans emerging from the Bering land bridge and expanding into the American continent.

Because we called it "information technology" and not "culture technology", we didn't notice that we exploded every aspect of our social-political-technological-economic environment. And to be fair, most of that has barely begun. We're basically in northern Alaska going "wow, look how big this place is".

I think we all intuit this at some level. Even now, people generally approach the world with an attitude of deep bewilderment. I see it in the grumbles of the new servant classes, in the musings of creatives, in the proud proclamations of our executive masters. "We were in the right place at the right time" means "I have no idea what's happening, why do I have this sports car? I'll probably lose everything next week".

Something that sticks out to me is how modernity is associated with a yearning for simplification. We love the zombie apocalypse. We are terrified of but also secretly yearn for a global warming based system collapse. We propose simple, narratively resonant solutions to super complex problems. We pretend that history is driven by leaders and vision and ideas, rather than being an alien mega-system grinding under its own logic.

And prognosticators about the future, predictably and ongoingly, present simple, legible, narratively intelligible visions of futures as a replacement for our intractable present, as if that is even remotely plausible.

But nothing's getting replaced. New things emerge, but they live alongside the others. We had radio, and films, then superior TV replaced them both, then VCRs made broadcast TV obsolete, then DVDs and CDs made previous media obsolete, then youtube swept all that away, then piracy destroyed the old media, then netflix and itunes ushered in our new commercial simple media future.

Except of course all of those things now coexist. Proportional popularity changes, but all the technologies stay and mix and merge in bizarre ways. I can get wifi in the vinyl record shop down the road, how's that for a future?

I read a lot about our post-capitalist future, but I've got news for you; there's not a post anything future. Everything stays, plus buckets of new stuff get added on top, then stir and simmer.

We're going to look back on 2016 and yearn for these simpler times. So I guess just try to enjoy it now. Enjoy these naive, gentler times, just before history begins in earnest.

https://medium.com/@emlynoregan/the-incomprehensible-future-73c1b96873a
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This is a surprisingly good article. I like the way it ends.

“If you see stuff that’s bad and you don’t respond with—what did King call it?—‘the urgency of the moment,’ then you’re not alive.”
On the road with a man so angry he scares Democrats, too.
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The latest installment of a continuing series in which American events are described using the tropes and tone normally employed by the American media to d
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"Publicly stand behind the women in your community, or eventually they will leave......"
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This renfores the point that "we", modern humans, are borgs of Homo evloutionary line, bring forth what is most needed to survive and leaving the rest behind.
 
The idea that Homo sapiens traits originated synchronously in different geographical reasons has a whiff of disrepute to it. After all, if human traits originated in different places at different times, then human equality seems like a wildly improbable coincidence. And if it's a wildly improbable coincidence, then it is most likely untrue. 

As an explanation of the facts, however, there's something to be said for multiregionalism. While the mitochondrial evidence is a fairly convincing argument that sapiens traits originated in North Africa, the human genome likely contains some contributions from Neanderthals and Denisovians. More controversially, there is some skeletal continuity between regional erectus populations and their early-sapiens replacements: the skulls and teeth of regional sapiens populations resemble those of the erectus populations which preceded them.

Presuming that there were multiregional contributions to modern sapiens, why is human intellectual capability so uniform? Every modern sapiens has a brain larger than every erectus. Furthermore, this uniform development appears to be cultural, not just skeletal: there are are no known congenitally-incompetent populations of early sapiens. Populations from Indonesia to Croatia to Kenya began to use relatively sophisticated tools as soon as their brains could accommodate them.

The orthodox conclusion is that the similarities in skeletal morphology are coincidental or illusory, that the contributions of non-sapiens populations are small, and that erectus was relatively recently replaced by modern humans departing Africa for cooler climes. This rather tidily dispatches the racist narrative surrounding even weak multiregionalism. But does there need to be a racist narrative at all? 

After all, gene flow does not require much transfer between populations. Only a few individuals need to interbreed with nearby populations in order for selection pressures to take hold. Taking that in mind, the same uniformity of capacity might be explained by profound selection pressure for sapiens traits. We all know, after all, how important intelligence is. 

Once the sapiens genes arrived in regional populations, they quickly spread throughout the population, leaving full-blooded erectus with a profound competitive disadvantage. Genes with a negative influence on intelligence were quickly culled, and those with a positive influence remained. 

This points strongly away from a racist conclusion: indeed, if intelligence is a highly selected trait, then populations in substantial historical contact, no matter their physical characteristics, will regress or advance to the intercultural intellectual mean. Thus we don't need to worry about wide intellectual disparities between interbreeding populations. Nature will fix those for us.
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He couldn't make it, but let us do our best to get there.
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"What differentiates me from many of the Trump supporters I met this weekend is that their concerns for our future have led to an overwhelming need to see all of our problems as someone else’s fault."
 
I have so much admiration for this woman and what she's doing.
It was interesting to hear Trump and his supporters’ viewpoints for more than just the few seconds offered by most soundbites, even though I disagreed
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I don't know how much can be accomplished by conversation with these people, I've tried it for much of my life, but showing one's humanity and respecting the humanity of others is always a good idea.
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+Buzz Aldrin​ the town is still yours. Thanks for taking the risk for humanity. I'll never forget.
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Journey-man web developer, building castles in the cloud
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  • Reading Plus
    Developer, 2012 - present
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    2012
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    Web developer, 2007 - 2012
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Great service, and the best morning coffee. They fresh grind Vermont Coffee Companies Dark Roast, and Tres Viva Cafe Dominicano. See ya there.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
Awesome community resource for all kinds of families. Where else can you get a chance to meet families originating from almost all four corners of this incredible world. I especially like the indoor playground, The staff is dedicated, responsive, and caring.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Looking for a burger that doesn't run you nine bucks, go no further. Good quality meat, excellent buns. The quality doesn't stop there, if you want a reasonably priced lunch in Winooski you couldn't pick a better place.
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
16 reviews
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Great service and care.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great spot, which is known to use local seasonal veggies from the Burlington's Intervale farms
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
One of if not the best resource for fruiting plants in VT. They have been around for a long time exploring what works in our strange Vermont environment. If it can be grown in Elmore good chance it can be grown anywhere in New England. The diversity of fruit trees extends from peaches and apricots, heirloom apples, pares and pawpaws. Best take a look at their site to get a full list of what they grow. I have found them helpful and supportive in getting my small intensive orchard up and running. By the end of next year I should have over nine plum trees, three pears, a cherry, a stand of raspberries, six varieties of grape, and a pair of kiwi. Helping me make my little part of the world a garden of overflowing streams and fruit.
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Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago