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Your source for up to date information on ISHI 28 in Seattle, WA | October 2-5, 2017
Your source for up to date information on ISHI 28 in Seattle, WA | October 2-5, 2017

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In late November 2017, the Massachusetts Office of Chief Medical Examiner (MAOCME) issued their first official identification of a deceased person based on the accredited use of Rapid DNA in their lab.  This represents the successful transition of Rapid DNA to a state agency as well as a successful modification and use of the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks) Standards for accreditation of Rapid DNA for relationship testing. 
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Can DNA found on a silk shawl uncover the true identity of the infamous Jack the Ripper?
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A graduate student sequenced rats all over Manhattan, and discovered how the city affects their genetic diversity.
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Another Monday! Here's your weekly dose of #Mondaymotivation.
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Here's what you need to know this week in the field of forensic science to get you out the door!
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Recounting 3 interesing cases from ISHI 23 focusing on serial killers Sheila Labarre, John Wayne Gacy, and Anthony Sowell.
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The notorious serial assassin killed from 1968 to the early 1970s, sending coded messages. Now DNA may crack the code of just who the Zodiac killer was.
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The best look yet at supposed Yeti samples also offers valuable insight into the genetic histories of rare Himalayan bears.
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The person behind a plot to harm and possibly kill Barack Obama was identified, authorities said, when tiny cat hairs found on an explosive package were matched to cats owned by a 46-year-old Texas woman.
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Seth Faith of North Carolina State University describes POPSeq, a Human STR Sequence Diversity Database designed to compile allele frequencies of sequence-based STR loci across multiple populations.
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