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Isabelle Vea
Works at Nagoya University
Lives in Nagoya
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Isabelle Vea

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Thoughts on why biologists should use GitHub

#github   #data   #biology   #science   #reproducibility  
Today, all biologists use computers on a daily basis, produce and analyse data. A lot of us now have to learn programming (even just some bits of it). I am not a computer scientist/engineer, and I …
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Isabelle Vea

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Last week, I started an online course at Udacity to introduce myself to data science and try to understand what it takes to analyse big datasets. About Udacity: I have successfully (and unsuccessfully, while I was writing my Ph.D. dissertation) taken…
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Isabelle Vea

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A good resource to support PhDs that decide to leave academia
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Isabelle Vea

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Check out this timescale for scale insects! This project was part of my PhD dissertation and goes along with the revision of fossil scale insects published last year (http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/6575). 

We found that the scale insects were very diverse (at least at the family level) long before the flowering plants started to radiate. This group was challenging but awesome to study, I got to examine extremely well preserved specimens of 1mm that came to us after 130 million years!

Accumulating the morphological (along with descriptive work) and molecular data, analyses etc took me 6 years. Got to go to the most prestigious natural history collections (the NSF is now suspending funding for biological research collections: http://www.nature.com/news/biological-specimen-troves-threatened-by-funding-pause-1.19599) that were meticulously curated. I wouldn't have managed to have this work done without the collections (library and specimens)!

#entomology #phylogenetics #museum #collection #nsf #fossils #insects
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Isabelle Vea

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Kicking off 2016 with the SICB annual meeting which is taking place in Portland and starting on January 3rd. I will be presenting poster and oral presentations related to my postdoctoral work on the hormonal regulation of extreme sexual dimorphism in…
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Isabelle Vea

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Pitching in science is important! Here's how to
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Artifical Chemotaxis

Something that explains the attraction found in drops of food colouring.

“ The critical fact was that food colouring is a two-component fluid. In such fluids, two different chemical compounds coexist while retaining separate molecular identities.

The droplets in this experiment consisted of two molecular compounds found naturally in food colouring: water and propylene glycol. The researchers discovered how the dynamic interactions of these two molecular components enabled inanimate droplets to mimic some of the behaviours of living cells.

This complex behavior is something called artificial chemotaxis which Manu Prakash explains in layman’s terms in the video below: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMsaH6SY4CY

The physical properties of these fluids give rise to this immense complexity of behavior. For example, chasing and sensing each other, and very much what we call artificial chemotaxis.

Chemotaxis is the idea in biology that one single cell can sense where its enemy is, and it brings up all its machinery, and it chases that enemy to try to eat it.”

Source & credit: http://goo.gl/s2MbG1 #scienceeveryday   #sciencesunday  
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Isabelle Vea

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Latest insect photos from France and the UK.

#macrophotography #entomology #macro #insects
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Wow, nice scan...
 
The new species, which has been named Invavita piratica (meaning "ancient intruder" and "piracy"), belongs to a group of parasites known as tongue worms. It is the ancient ancestor of 140 species of modern-day parasites that live within the respiratory system of their host.

"In fact, it's not a worm," said Prof Siveter. "It belongs to the broad group of animals we call arthropods."


Researchers discover the 425-million-year-old remains of a new species of parasite - still clamped to the host animal it invaded.
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Isabelle Vea

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#cicada   #okinawa   #japan   #iriomote   #macrophotography  

Found this small cicada in Okinawa. I wonder what species it is...
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Tomoka Toraiwa (虎岩朋加)'s profile photo
 
Did you take this picture? Amazing..
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Isabelle's Collections
Story
Tagline
In a quest to discover the mystery of sexual dimorphism in scale insects
Introduction

"Suivant Lampride, Martial & Pline l'ancien, le mot coccus signifioit la couleur rouge que nous appelons écarlatte, & la graine felon eux dont on tiroit cette couleur " Thiery de Menonville, 1787.

Bragging rights
I used to be scared of bugs, now I am an entomologist
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Nagoya
Previously
New York City - Paris - Limoges - Chartres - Beijing
Work
Occupation
why male and female scale insects look so different
Employment
  • Nagoya University
    JSPS Postdoctoral fellow, 2013 - present
    Hormonal regulation in scale insect metamorphosis and sexual dimorphism
  • American Museum of Natural History
    Ph.D. student, 2009 - 2013
    Reconciling neontology and paleontology in scale insect systematics : http://goo.gl/Nj3bvg
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