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The Iran tourist visa application is easily done by filling the online visa form and just 39 $.
The Iran tourist visa application is easily done by filling the online visa form and just 39 $.

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Top 10 Amazing Mosques in Iran
Art manifestation in Islamic architecture was shown in mosque construction in countries like India, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Egypt, Afghanistan, Palestine, Syria and some other countries. The principal Islamic architectural types are: Mosque, Tomb, Palace and Fort.  Here we get familiar with Ten Amazing Mosques in Iran:
Read More about this top 10 mosques and share it with your friends and followers :)
http://www.irantravelingcenter.com/ten-amazing-mosques-in-iran/
#mosques   #iran   #islamic   #art   #architucture  
+Lonely Planet +Discover Lebanon +STS SHARIF +Sara ee 
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Pink Mosque Shiraz, Iran
The Nasir ol Molk Mosque, also known as the Pink Mosque, is a traditional mosque in Shiraz, Iran. It is located at the district of Gowad-e-Arabān, near Šāh Čerāq Mosque.
Address: Fars, Shiraz, Lotf Ali Khan Zand St
Opened: 1888
Architectural style: Islamic architecture
Municipality: Shiraz County
Province: Fars Province
Architects: Muhammad Reza Kashi Paz-e-Shirazi, Muhammad Hasan-e-Memar

http://www.irantravelingcenter.com/visa-iran-visa/
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Time to have some RED

Its Persian name is “Anar”انار, contrary to the difficult word pomegranate, the simplicity of “anar” shows how often it must have been used in everyday lives of Persians in the past. It was known as a fruit from paradise and there for planted around many worship locations and religion schools. It also had industrial usages , traditionally the thick layer of red pomegranate skin was used as color sources for coloring Persian carpet wool, hair color, fabric etc.

omegranate in the modern day Iran? Pomegranate has two types, the sweet type which have white skin and the sour or sour-sweet type which has red skin, therefore it can attack almost anybody due to this variety of taste. It is even a favorite among children since they “ab-lambo” , which means smashing into juice. When one cant be bothered the trouble of pealing the fruit, ab-lambu is the solution, which means smashing it smoothly with fingers, than making a small whole in the skin and sucking out the juice (very popular method for smaller pomegranate). Eating it raw is also very popular in the season, but these are not what makes pomegranate special and essential to Iranian lifestyle.

http://www.irantravelingcenter.com/why-iranian-lifestyle-cant-be-without-pomegranate/

#iran   #food  
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Perseids Night in Iran

This year Perseids made perfect night for amatur and proffesional Astronomer around the world and also in Iran. This shot took it in desert close to Shiraz in south of Iran. Hundreds of youth spend their night in desserts and enjoy this amazing night.

Photo by: +Pooria N 

What is Perseids?

The Perseids /ˈpərsiːɪdz/ are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Swift–Tuttle. The Perseids are so called because the point from which they appear to come, called the radiant, lies in the constellation Perseus. The name derives in part from the word Perseides (Περσείδες), a term found in Greek mythology referring to the sons of Perseus.

The stream of debris is called the Perseid cloud and stretches along the orbit of the comet Swift–Tuttle. The cloud consists of particles ejected by the comet as it travels on its 133-year orbit.[5] Most of the particles have been part of the cloud for around a thousand years. However, there is also a relatively young filament of dust in the stream that was pulled off the comet in 1865, which can give an early mini-peak the day before the maximum shower.[6] The dimensions of the cloud in the vicinity of the Earth are estimated to be approximately 0.1 astronomical units (AU) across and 0.8 AU along the latter’s orbit, spread out by annual interactions with the Earth’s gravity.[7]

The shower is visible from mid-July each year, with the peak in activity between 9 and 14 August, depending on the particular location of the stream. During the peak, the rate of meteors reaches 60 or more per hour. They can be seen all across the sky; however, because of the shower’s radiant in the constellation of Perseus, the Perseids are primarily visible in the Northern Hemisphere. As with many meteor showers the visible rate is greatest in the pre-dawn hours, since more meteoroids are scooped up by the side of the Earth moving forward into the stream, corresponding to local times between midnight and noon, as can be seen in the accompanying diagram.[8] While many meteors arrive between dawn and noon, they are usually not visible due to daylight. Some can also be seen before midnight, often grazing the Earth’s atmosphere to produce long bright trails and sometimes fireballs. Most Perseids burn up in the atmosphere while at heights above 80 kilometres (50 mi).

http://www.irantravelingcenter.com/astronomy-in-iran/
#iran   #Perseids  
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 The colorful mountains near Tabriz, Iran
#iran  
#tabriz  
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Gahar Lake, Lorestan The Paradise for camping :)

Must See Iran: There are two lakes within 100 meters of each other named the Upper Gahar and the Lower Gahar on the southern summit of Mount Ashtaran in Lorestan province.
The lower lake is the larger of the two and its altitude is 1,600 meters (5,250 feet) lower than the other. The Upper Gahar Lake is situated at an altitude of 2,300 meters (7,545 feet).
Altogether, they are 2,100 meters (1.3 miles) long and 355 meters (1,164 feet) wide. The lake is situated between the towns of Aligoudarz and Doroud.
#mustseeiran  
http://mustseeiran.org/must-visit-iran/gahar-lake-lorestan/
http://instagram.com/mustseeiran
https://www.facebook.com/mustseeiniran
https://twitter.com/MustSeeinIran
https://pinterest.com/mustseeiran
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Colorful Wedding in Iranian Qashqai Nomads
Qashqai  also spelled Ghashghai,  are a conglomeration of clans of different ethnic origins, including Persian, Lori, Kurdish, Arab and (especially) Turkic. They mainly live in the Iranian provinces of Fars, Khuzestan and southern Isfahan, especially around the city of Shiraz in Fars. They are bilingual, speaking the Qashqai language - which is a member of the Turkic family of languages and which they call Turki - as well as (in formal use) the Persian language. The Qashqai were originally nomadic pastoralists and some remain so today. The traditional nomadic Qashqai travelled with their flocks each year from the summer highland pastures north of Shiraz roughly 480 km or 300 miles south to the winter pastures on lower (and warmer) lands near the Persian Gulf, to the southwest of Shiraz. The majority, however, have now become partially or wholly sedentary. The trend towards settlement has been increasing markedly since the 1960s.

The Qashqai are made up of a number of tribes and sub-tribes including the Amele, Derre-Shuri, Kashkyoli, Shesh(6) Baluki, Farsimadan, Qaraja, Rahimli and Safi -Khanli.
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Colorful Wedding in Iranian Qashqai Nomads
Qashqai  also spelled Ghashghai,  are a conglomeration of clans of different ethnic origins, including Persian, Lori, Kurdish, Arab and (especially) Turkic. They mainly live in the Iranian provinces of Fars, Khuzestan and southern Isfahan, especially around the city of Shiraz in Fars. They are bilingual, speaking the Qashqai language - which is a member of the Turkic family of languages and which they call Turki - as well as (in formal use) the Persian language. The Qashqai were originally nomadic pastoralists and some remain so today. The traditional nomadic Qashqai travelled with their flocks each year from the summer highland pastures north of Shiraz roughly 480 km or 300 miles south to the winter pastures on lower (and warmer) lands near the Persian Gulf, to the southwest of Shiraz. The majority, however, have now become partially or wholly sedentary. The trend towards settlement has been increasing markedly since the 1960s.

The Qashqai are made up of a number of tribes and sub-tribes including the Amele, Derre-Shuri, Kashkyoli, Shesh(6) Baluki, Farsimadan, Qaraja, Rahimli and Safi -Khanli.
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Colorful Wedding in Iranian Qashqai Nomads
Qashqai  also spelled Ghashghai,  are a conglomeration of clans of different ethnic origins, including Persian, Lori, Kurdish, Arab and (especially) Turkic. They mainly live in the Iranian provinces of Fars, Khuzestan and southern Isfahan, especially around the city of Shiraz in Fars. They are bilingual, speaking the Qashqai language - which is a member of the Turkic family of languages and which they call Turki - as well as (in formal use) the Persian language. The Qashqai were originally nomadic pastoralists and some remain so today. The traditional nomadic Qashqai travelled with their flocks each year from the summer highland pastures north of Shiraz roughly 480 km or 300 miles south to the winter pastures on lower (and warmer) lands near the Persian Gulf, to the southwest of Shiraz. The majority, however, have now become partially or wholly sedentary. The trend towards settlement has been increasing markedly since the 1960s.

The Qashqai are made up of a number of tribes and sub-tribes including the Amele, Derre-Shuri, Kashkyoli, Shesh(6) Baluki, Farsimadan, Qaraja, Rahimli and Safi -Khanli.
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