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Inner Art of Airmanship
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Inner Art of Airmanship

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"In the event of a dire emergency, stop and wind the clock. In other words, don’t react immediately. Stop, slow down, see what’s going on and then deal with it."

~ Timothy Nathan, British GA pilot. (http://bit.ly/1aup9fZ)
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Inner Art of Airmanship

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Dale Masters, 12,000 hours in gliders, on flying and understanding:

"This sport can be terribly frustrating at all levels, but after we pay our inevitable dues, it becomes more than worth the effort. Less experienced pilots must be patient and persistent, and continue to try different variations of method. After a few long thermal flight we begin to develop a sense of what is about to happen, and what to do about it. Then, after a few hundred flights, we begin to gain an intuitive sense of how to perform little miracles, almost on demand. To avenge the disappointment of short flights when the old-timers are trumpeting how good the soaring is, preserve, be as sensitive as possible to all forms of information, and use your imagination.

And never assume you really understand."


(from his book Soaring: Beyond the Basics)
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Inner Art of Airmanship

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I do not compete for trophies. ~ Wilbur Wright
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"The trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit."

~ Molière
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"At that crisis point, experience takes a back seat and all your training kicks in."

~ Luca Parmitano, fighter pilot, pilot, astronaut, describing handling a problem in low Earth orbit.

http://bit.ly/1z3V3Eo
From pilot training to risking his life on the ISS, astronaut Luca Parmitano talks about a career in the stars and how to get there • Undercover in MI6: what's it like to work as a spy? • Why I became an investigative reporter
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Inner Art of Airmanship

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"The hard and stiff will be broken; the soft and supple will prevail."

~ Lao Tzu
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Love the sweet squeak of success!
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Have them in circles
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Inner Art of Airmanship

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Be one with the wing.
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Inner Art of Airmanship

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When things go wrong at that speed, they go wrong in a hurry. You can't overreact. That was the whole point of our training, to weed that out, because everything's going so fast that if you overreact you could put yourself into a position you couldn't recover from.

~ Rick McCrary, on flying the SR-71 Blackbird. I'm sure it's true at Mach 3, because it's true in a Piper Cub.
Spencer Hall interviews former SR-71 Blackbird pilot Rick McCrary about what it's like to fly the world's fastest plane. Spoiler: It's terrifying.
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Airbus has identified nine ‘core competencies’ for airline pilots:

Workload management, situation awareness, communication, manual flight, application of procedures, auto flight, leadership & teamwork, problem solving and decision-making.

Read how they built a new training course to teach these for the A50: http://bit.ly/1Gj7tOz
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Sometimes airmanship is not flying.

"Pilots should never have to choose between the safety of themselves and their passengers, and their job. Whistleblower protections are critical to keeping workplaces safe. Disciplining an employee for following safety procedures is illegal and puts everyone at risk."

~ Nick Walters, OSHA's regional administrator in Chicago.

The US Department of Labor recently released an order (http://1.usa.gov/1F08eux) with a rare win for a pilot against a large corporation. They are requiring that Air Methods (who operate over 400 helicopters) pay a pilot employee $160,000 in lost pay and damages after he refused to fly a mission because of an airworthiness issue (the emergency locator transmitter that was not functioning properly). They had placed him on administrative leave the day after the event, and fired him about a month later. Now they have to reinstate the pilot, and educate all their workers on whistleblower rights.

Acknowledging the inherent conflict between production and safety is central to modern safety management. If an aviation company is really serious about zero accidents or perfect safety, they could simply not launch any aircraft. But that does not make any money, does not move critically injured people to hospitals. If we open our eyes, get real, we must acknowledge this perpetual balancing problem, and get serious about safety.

Sometimes, the right thing to do is to refuse a flight. Whatever the pressures. Sometimes airmanship is not about how we fly, it's about not flying.

(Picture credit: By Alan Radecki (Own work) [GFDL (http://bit.ly/1F08euy), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://bit.ly/1F08g5F) or CC BY 2.5 (http://bit.ly/1F08euE)], via Wikimedia Commons)
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Inner Art of Airmanship

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"Monday's aren't so bad. It's your job that sucks."
“#ankara #istanbul #thy #turkishairlines #izmir #pilot #captain #plane #flihgt #airport #ucak #airlife #cabin #pegasusairlines #atlasjet #cabincrew #wolrd…”
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Enjoying the Perpetual Pursuit of Piloting Perfection
Introduction
We learn from every pilot we fly with, every pilot we talk to. Sometimes we learn a lot.