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Immigration Attorney Marcela C. Rodriguez, Esq.
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Beginning with the November 2015 Department of State (DOS) Visa Bulletin, if USCIS determines that there are more immigrant visas available for a fiscal year than there are known applicants for such visas, we will state on www.uscis.gov/visabulletininfo that applicants may use the Dates for Filing Visa Applications chart. Unless otherwise stated on our website, the Application Final Action Date chart will be used to determine when individuals may file their adjustment of status applications.
We anticipate making this determination each month and posting the relevant chart on our website within one week of DOS’ publication of the Visa Bulletin.
About the Visa Bulletin
DOS publishes current immigrant visa availability information in a monthly Visa Bulletin. The Visa Bulletin indicates when statutorily limited visas are available to prospective immigrants based on their individual priority date.
The priority date is generally the date when the applicant’s relative or employer properly filed the immigrant visa petition on the applicant’s behalf with USCIS. If a labor certification is required to be filed with the applicant’s immigrant visa petition, then the priority date is when the labor certification application was accepted for processing by Department of Labor.
Availability of an immigrant visa means eligible applicants are able to take one of the final steps in the process of becoming U.S. permanent residents.

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Hearing on Oversight of the Administration’s Misdirected Immigration Enforcement Policies: Examining the Impact on Public Safety and Honoring the Victims before the Senate Committee on Judiciary on July 2015 by USCIS Director Leon Rodriguez
Release Date: July 21, 2015
 
 WRITTEN TESTIMONY
OF
LEON RODRIGUEZ
DIRECTOR
U.S. CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES
FOR A HEARING ON
“Oversight of the Administration’s Misdirected Immigration Enforcement Policies: Examining the Impact on Public Safety and Honoring the Victims”
BEFORE
THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY
JULY 21, 2015 10:00AM
226 DIRKSEN SENATE OFFICE BUILDING
WASHINGTON, DC
Chairman Grassley and Ranking Member Leahy and distinguished members of the Committee, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today to testify about Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).
Even before joining USCIS, I was keenly aware of the agency’s proud history of administering immigration services with quality and integrity for individuals from all over the world. Like you, I fully understand just how critical it is for USCIS to successfully deliver on its mission in support of the fundamental values of our nation, whether they are economic, humanitarian, or for other national interests. As I approach my one year anniversary as Director of USCIS, I am tremendously proud to lead an organization in which thousands of dedicated public servants administer our complex immigration system fairly, effectively, and professionally while working tirelessly to strengthen and improve our processes each and every day. As a former state and federal prosecutor, I am fully committed to ensuring that our immigration system is protected against individuals who pose a threat to our national security and public safety or seek to defraud the system.
It is truly an honor and a privilege to work alongside the men and women of USCIS. As the son, grandson and great-grandson of immigrants who came to the United States fleeing persecution and hoping for a better future, I know firsthand that our nation’s immigration laws and policies can change lives, provide opportunities to future generations, and contribute to our economic growth and well-being. As I have regularly said, every USCIS file contains the story of one family’s hopes, dreams, and all too often, suffering.
I was drawn to the USCIS mission not only because of my family’s experience, but also because I am a patriot devoted to our country’s values of freedom, equality, hard work, and enterprise. Immigration is the very foundation of our nation’s identity, and I am committed to ensuring that our immigration system is equipped to protect our nation while supporting our long-standing tradition of welcoming immigrants, workers, refugees, and new Americans to our shores.
 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
This Administration has worked diligently to focus our limited immigration enforcement resources on national security, public safety, and border security. As a part of that commitment, on June 15, 2012, then-Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced that certain individuals who came to the United States as children and meet several key guidelines can request deferred action and permission to work for a period of two years. As explained by Secretary Napolitano, the DACA process supports DHS-wide efforts to prioritize overall enforcement resources more efficiently to focus on the removal of criminals, recent illegal border crossers, and those non-citizens who pose a threat to national security or public safety, while recognizing the humanitarian principles that also underlie our immigration laws. As Secretary Napolitano stated in her 2012 memorandum, the individuals favorably considered for DACA are “young people brought to this country as children.”
USCIS first implemented DACA in August 2012. Under DACA, children and young adults may be considered on a case-by-case basis for deferred action if they meet certain threshold guidelines, including that they were under the age of 31 as of June 2012, pass criminal and national security background checks, were present in the United States in June 2012 and have lived here continuously for at least five years as of that date. All individuals requesting DACA are subjected to biographic and biometric background checks against various national law enforcement databases before USCIS will consider their DACA request. These systems include data on immigration history, public safety, national security and criminal watchlists, and other law enforcement concerns such as gang membership.
Each DACA request is considered on a case-by-case basis by an adjudicator who must make a determination about whether a specific requestor meets the applicable guidelines, whether they pose a threat to public safety or national security, and whether other factors are present that might adversely impact the exercise of discretion. DACA does not confer legal status on the recipient; it is an exercise of prosecutorial discretion to defer the removal of an individual for a specific period of time and may be reconsidered or terminated at any time.
USCIS adjudicators evaluate the evidence each DACA requestor submits in conjunction with the relevant DACA guidelines. Adjudicators assess the appropriate weight to accord such evidence, and ultimately determine whether the evidence is sufficient to satisfy the guidelines and whether there are any other factors that, in the exercise of discretion, would make the grant of deferred action inappropriate. An adjudicator may issue a Request for Evidence (RFE), which requires the requestor to submit additional evidence in support of the DACA request before the request will be decided. Since the inception of DACA through March 31, 2015, USCIS issued more than 200,000 RFEs in the process of reviewing DACA requests. Failure to respond to an RFE may result in denial of the request.
Individuals accorded deferred action pursuant to DACA are considered for employment authorization under longstanding USCIS regulations, which stipulate that persons with deferred action who demonstrate economic necessity may be authorized to work in the United States for the duration of their deferred action. In addition, DACA recipients are permitted to request a renewal of their deferred action and work authorization when their initial two-year period nears expiration. The DACA renewal period began in August 2014, two years after the first requests were accepted. DACA is funded exclusively through the fees requestors submit with the applications for employment authorization accompanying the initial DACA request and request for DACA renewal.
USCIS publishes quarterly data on the number of DACA requests received, accepted, granted and denied. Since the inception of DACA through the end of March 2015:
USCIS has received 1,175,689 DACA requests.
More than 71,000 of these requests were rejected and returned at the outset before being considered. Rejections may occur for a variety of reasons, such as the DACA request submitted is incomplete or without fee, or the requestor fails to meet the age guideline.
Of the 1,104,594 DACA requests accepted by USCIS, 748,789 were initial requests and 355,805 were renewal requests.
Of the 748,789 initial requests, USCIS approved 664,607 and denied 43,375; 40,807 remained pending.
Of the 355,805 renewal requests, USCIS approved 243,872, 414 have been denied, and 111,519 remain pending.
Denials may occur, for example, when a DACA requestor does not meet the continuous residence or education guidelines, was deemed to pose a threat to national security or public safety, or was otherwise deemed not to warrant deferred action based on the case-by-case review of each application.
These data indicate the volume of requests USCIS has received, the care with which requests are reviewed
These data indicate the volume of requests USCIS has received, the care with which requests are reviewed, and the number of individuals who have received deferred action. These statistics, however, do not illustrate the human face of DACA. Hundreds of thousands of DACA recipients are now able to come out of the shadows, attend school without fear, work to support themselves and their families, and contribute to their communities.
These figures represent real people. I recently learned about the situation of twin sisters who were born in Mexico and were brought to the United States by their mother at age five. As time passed, these sisters became proficient in English and continued to excel academically. Prior to DACA, these young women, who had spent nearly their entire childhood in the United States, did not know if they would ever go to college because they were undocumented. The sisters were accorded deferred action pursuant to DACA, and went on to graduate from high school with honors. Now, they attend a prestigious college and have said they are committed to continuing to work hard so they can give back to the university and the nation.
These sisters are just two of the many examples of young people who are now able to fully contribute to their communities and to this nation because they can finally emerge from the shadows, and give back to the community. Indeed, DACA is part of a greater DHS effort to ensure that valuable and limited enforcement resources are spent wisely and focused on those individuals who are a danger to national security or a risk to public safety rather than the three young people I just described. It is this very principle that serves as the foundation of President Obama’s Immigration Accountability Executive Actions.
Immigration Accountability Executive Actions
Recognizing the need to fix our broken immigration system, President Obama requested that the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice undertake a rigorous and inclusive review to assess the initiatives the Administration could pursue--within the confines of the law and the Executive Branch’s authority--to increase border security, better focus enforcement resources, and ensure accountability in our immigration system. In conducting his review, Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson considered the advice and input from the men and women charged with implementing the policies as well as the views of Members of Congress and a broad range of stakeholders.
Following this review, on November 20, 2014, Secretary Johnson issued ten memoranda to the DHS workforce outlining a series of immigration initiatives that President Obama announced to the American people the same day. Included in the ten memoranda were initiatives designed to crack down on illegal immigration at the border, prioritize deporting felons rather than families, and promote public safety by allowing certain undocumented immigrants who have family ties to the United States and who pass criminal and national security background checks to request consideration for deferred action.
Several of the initiatives announced would directly affect USCIS, including:
Expanding the population who may be considered for deferred action under DACA to individuals who entered the United States before the age of 16 and have lived in the United States continuously since January 1, 2010, regardless of whether an individual was older than 31 years of age in June 2012, and immediately granting periods of deferred action and employment authorization of three years (rather than two) to any person granted DACA under the existing 2012 guidelines (and for those who would later be granted DACA under the expanded 2014 guidelines);
Allowing certain parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents to request deferred action and employment authorization for three years, known as Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA), provided, among other things, that they have lived in the United States continuously since January 1, 2010, pass required background checks, and are not enforcement priorities;
Modernizing, improving and clarifying immigrant and nonimmigrant visa programs to grow our economy, and create jobs and promote family unity; and
Promoting citizenship education and public awareness for lawful permanent residents and providing an option for naturalization applicants to use credit cards to pay the application fee.
 After the President’s announcement and the issuance of the Secretary of Homeland Security’s memoranda, the men and women of USCIS immediately began efforts to implement each of these initiatives. As outlined in the Secretary’s November 20, 2014 memorandum entitled, Exercising Prosecutorial Discretion with Respect to Individuals Who Came to the United States as Children and with Respect to Certain Individuals Who Are Parents of U.S. Citizens or Permanent Residents, USCIS was directed to begin accepting DACA requests under the new criteria within 90 days and DAPA requests no later than 180 days of issuance.
In addition, the guidance stated, “The period for which DACA and the accompanying employment authorization is granted will be extended to three-year increments, rather than the current two-year increments. This change shall apply to all first-time applications as well as all applications for renewal effective November 24, 2014. Beginning on that date, USCIS should issue all work authorization documents valid for three years, including to those individuals who have applied and are awaiting two-year work authorization documents based on the renewal of their DACA grants.”
The months that followed were a period of intense activity as USCIS continued to consider DACA requests under the existing 2012 guidelines and as we readied the agency to accept DACA requests from an additional group of individuals under the new guidelines in anticipation of a February 18, 2015 launch. Preparations were also undertaken for the intended May 2015 implementation of DAPA, which included initiating hiring actions, form revisions, and IT system modifications. Throughout these preparations, USCIS adjudicators also continued to process high volumes of initial DACA requests and renewals under the 2012 guidelines. USCIS processed an average of more than 13,000 DACA requests (both initials and renewals) per week, and as directed in the Secretary of Homeland Security’s 2014 memorandum, beginning on November 24, 2014, individuals who received DACA after a case-by-case review under the 2012 guidelines were accorded deferred action and, if eligible, work authorization for three-year periods rather than two-year periods.
On February 16, 2015, just two days before the agency was prepared to begin accepting DACA requests under the new guidelines, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Brownsville Division issued a preliminary injunction prohibiting USCIS from implementing the 2014 Secretary Johnson memorandum entitled, Exercising Prosecutorial Discretion with Respect to Individuals Who Came to the United States as Children and with Respect to Certain Individuals Who Are Parents of U.S. Citizens or Permanent Residents.
USCIS Compliance with Preliminary Injunction Entered in Texas v. United States
When the District Court issued its preliminary injunction, USCIS immediately took steps to ensure that the agency ceased preparations to implement the new DACA eligibility guidelines and to implement DAPA. USCIS also took immediate steps intended to ensure that we ceased issuing three-year (rather than two-year) periods of deferred action and work authorization to DACA recipients processed under the 2012 memorandum (a change that had commenced, as directed by the memorandum, on November 24, 2014). Between November 24, 2014 and the date of the injunction, USCIS had granted approximately 108,000 three-year EADs to renewal and initial requestors who were granted deferred action under the 2012 DACA guidelines. The vast majority of these requests were filed prior to the issuance of the November 20, 2014 memoranda. The large number of requests and decisions during this period reflect the natural cycle of DACA renewals, as the initial two-year periods of deferred action and work authorization were expiring for those persons who were granted DACA during the initial months after its launch in 2012.
Under my direction, the agency’s efforts to comply with the preliminary injunction began in the very early morning of February 17, 2015, just hours after the preliminary injunction ruling was issued, and have continued thereafter in an agency-wide effort to ensure that USCIS achieved, and remained in, full compliance with the District Court’s injunction. Specifically, these actions included:
Instructions from me to USCIS leadership the morning of February 17 directing that no further action be taken to implement the Secretary’s deferred action memorandum on expanded DACA and DAPA.
Orders from USCIS leadership on February 17 directing staff to immediately suspend approval of all deferred action or employment authorization, including temporarily under the existing DACA guidelines, and to cease issuance of notices of approval or Employment Authorization Documents (EADs), regardless of the authorized period of time. Note: reauthorization was given on February 18 to approve requests and to resume issuing approval notices and EADs under the 2012 DACA eligibility guidelines, but only for two-year periods, as provided by the 2012 DACA policy. 
Notification to the entire USCIS workforce on February 17 regarding the injunction and the need to suspend preparations for implementation of the Secretary’s November 20, 2014 deferred action memorandum;
Notification to communications staff to halt the planned posting of the new expanded DACA request form on February 17, 2015;
Addition of a banner to the USCIS public website on February 17 stating that implementation of the expanded DACA guidelines and new DAPA guidelines had been enjoined;
Removal of the new expanded DACA form instructions and related “Frequently Asked Questions” that had been posted on the USCIS public website on February 14, 2015;
Reversion to the 2012 public guidance in place for DACA prior to November 20, 2014;
Cessation of policy and operational discussions to develop guidelines, procedures and forms to implement DAPA; and
Suspension of new hiring actions to bring staff on board to support DAPA.
The actions taken by USCIS reflect the agency’s clear intent to comply fully with the court-ordered injunction. However, while USCIS initially stopped issuing three-year EADs that had been approved prior to the injunction, USCIS failed to prevent the release of approximately 2,000 three-year EADs for individuals eligible for 2012 DACA once the agency’s initial February 17 freeze on all EADs was lifted, and thereafter erroneously issued a small number of three-year EADs due to manual errors. In addition, USCIS re-mailed some three-year EADs (approximately 500) that had initially been mailed before the injunction, were returned by the U.S. Postal Service as undeliverable, and were re-mailed by USCIS after the injunction.
As the Director of USCIS, I accept full responsibility for these mistakes. The Secretary of Homeland Security has asked the DHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) to investigate the circumstances of the issuance of the approximately 2000 three-year EADs after the issuance of the preliminary injunction order. USCIS fully supports this investigation, and like Secretary Johnson, I have notified agency leadership and relevant staff components directing full and expedited cooperation with the OIG.
USCIS has implemented corrective measures, including the conversion of all the validity periods of deferred action and employment authorization to two years, and USCIS is in the process of issuing new two-year EADs, for each of the 2,000 erroneously issued three-year EADs, as well as those approximately 500 returned as undeliverable as earlier described. In addition, USCIS is in the process of retrieving all erroneously-issued three-year EADs and has notified those individuals who received the now-invalid three-year EADs that their deferred action and employment authorization will be terminated on July 31, 2015, if those individuals do not comply with the requirements for returning the invalid EAD. Additionally, I have directed the agency to take additional precautions, including the modification of USCIS computer systems and additional quality control measures to further minimize the potential for manual error that could lead to unintended issuance of three-year EADs, instead of two years, in future DACA cases.
I am confident that USCIS has taken the actions necessary to correct the mistakes and prevent similar issues in the future. I am particularly grateful that our workforce proactively identified the problem and mobilized to address it.
Conclusion
USCIS is committed to ensuring the integrity, accuracy and efficiency of its processes. We are a large agency – with approximately 19,000 employees and contractors – and we process nearly 8 million applications, petitions, and requests each year. The talented and dedicated USCIS workforce consistently rises to this challenge, recognizing that our work represents individual circumstances, histories, and hopes that serve as the foundation for our nation.
The American people deserve an immigration system that lives up to our heritage as a nation of laws and a nation of immigrants. While DACA serves the dual purpose of the wise use of enforcement resources and fairness, it cannot substitute for comprehensive immigration reform. The Administration and DHS will continue to urge Congress to enact lasting, comprehensive reform. USCIS stands ready to support the implementation of these reforms once they are achieved.
Thank you for the opportunity to testify. I look forward to your questions.

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Pwolongasyon Estati Pwoteksyon Tanporè (TPS) pou Ayiti
Release Date: August 25, 2015
WASHINGTON -- Sekretè Sekirite Enteryè Jeh Johnson pwolonje nominasyon Ayiti pou Stati Pwoteksyon Tanporè (Temporary Protected Status, TPS) pou yon lòt 18 mwa. Pwolongasyon nominasyon an ap anvigè ant 23 janvye 2016 ak 22 jiyè 2017.
Benefisyè TPS Ayiti pou kounye a kap chèche pwolonje estati TPS yo dwe anrejistre ankò pandan yon peryòd tan 60 jou ki soti 25 out 2015, pou rive 26 októb 2015. Sèvis Sitwayen Ameriken ak Sèvis Imigrasyon (USCIS) ankouraje benefisyè pou yo anrejistre ankò san pèdi tan, kou peryòd tan 60 jou pou re anjistre a kòmanse. USCIS pap asepte fòmilè anvan 25 out 2015.
Estansyon 18 mwa a pèmèt tou moun kap reanrejistre pou TPS fè demann pou yon nouvo Dokiman Otorizasyon pou Travay (Employment Authorization Document, EAD) Benefisyè TPS Ayiti kalifye kap reanrejistre pandan peryòd tan 60 jou a epi kap mande yon nouvo EAD pral resevwa youn kap espire nan dat 22 jiyè 2017. USCIS rekonèt sèten nan moun kap reanrejistre yo ka pa resevwa nouvo EAD yo apre EAD ki nan men yo an espire. Se pou tèt sa USCIS ap pwolonje otomatikman dat espirasyon EAD TPS Ayiti ki pote dat 22 janvye 2016 yo pou yon lòt sis mwa. EAD sa yo ki egziste deja valid kounye a pou jiska 22 jiyè 2016.
Yo te chwazi premye fwa Ayiti pou TPS nan dat 21 janvye 2010 apre yon kokenn tranblemantè te devaste peyi a. Apre konsiltasyon ak lòt ajans federal, Depatman Sekirite Enteryè (Homeland Security) jwenn sitiyasyon jounen jodi nan peyi Dayiti se bon rezon pou pwolongasyon peryòd nominasyon an pou benefisyè TPS pou kounye yo.
Pou reanrejistre, benefisyè TPS pou kounye yo dwe prezante:
Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status (Moun kap re anrejistre pa bezwen peye frè aplikasyon Fòm I-821 an).
Frè sèvis byometrik yo (oswa yon demann eliminasyon frè) si yo gen 14 lane oswa plis.
Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, kèlkeseswa yo vle yon EAD oswa yo pa vle youn.
Frè aplikasyon Fòm I-765 lan oswa yon demann eliminasyon frè, men sèlman nan ka yo vle yon EAD. Si moun kap re anrejistre a pa vle yon EAD, li pa gen pou peye yon frè aplikasyon.
Moun kap fè demann ka mande pou USCIS elimine frè aplikasyon Fòm I-765 lan ak/oswa frè byometrik yo sou baz enkapasite moun lan pou l peye. Pou fè sa, moun kap mande yo dwe ranpli yon Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver oswa voye yon demann alekri. Demann eliminasyon frè fèt pou yo akonpaye ak papye kap kore demann lan. USCIS pral rejte aplikasyon TPS tout moun kap fè demann ki pa voye frè dosye yo mande a oswa yon demann eliminasyon frè ki akonpaye ak bon jan papye.
Tout fòm USCIS yo gratis. Moun kap fè demann ka telechaje fòm sa yo sou sit wèb USCIS la nan uscis.gov/forms oswa yo ka mande yo nan telefòn nan nimewo 1-800-870-3676 gratis USCIS la.
W ap jwenn enfòmasyon anplis sou TPS pou Ayiti---tankou konsèy sou kalifikasyon, pwosesis aplikasyon an, epi kote pou depoze l nan uscis.gov/tps. Genyen plis detay sou estansyon TPS pou Ayiti sa, tankou kondisyon ak pwosedi aplikasyon yo, nan yon avi Federal Register ki pibliye jodi a.
Moun ki fè demann epi kap chèche enfòmasyon sou stati dosye endividyèl yo ka tyeke My Case Status Online, oswa rele USCIS National Customer Service Center nan 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833). Pou jwenn plis enfòmasyon sou USCIS ak pwogram li yo, ale sou uscis.gov. Swiv nou sou Facebook (/uscis), Twitter ( uscis), YouTube (/uscis) ak sou blòg USCIS la The Beacon.

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Temporary Protected Status Extended for Haiti
Release Date: August 25, 2015
WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Haiti’s designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for an additional 18 months. The extended designation is effective Jan. 23, 2016, through July 22, 2017.  
Current TPS Haiti beneficiaries seeking to extend their TPS status must re-register during a 60-day period that runs from Aug. 25, 2015, through Oct. 26, 2015. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to re-register as soon as possible once the 60-day re-registration period begins. USCIS will not accept applications before Aug. 25, 2015.
The 18-month extension also allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Eligible TPS Haiti beneficiaries who re-register during the 60-day period and request a new EAD will receive one with an expiration date of July 22, 2017. USCIS recognizes that some re-registrants may not receive their new EADs until after their current EADs expire. Therefore, USCIS is automatically extending current TPS Haiti EADs bearing a Jan. 22, 2016, expiration date for an additional six months. These existing EADs are now valid through July 22, 2016.
Haiti was initially designated for TPS on Jan. 21, 2010, after a major earthquake devastated the country. Following consultations with other federal agencies, the Department of Homeland Security has determined that current conditions in Haiti support extending the designation period for current TPS beneficiaries.
To re-register, current TPS beneficiaries must submit:
Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status (Re-registrants do not need to pay the Form I-821 application fee).
The biometric services fee (or a fee waiver request) if they are 14 years old or older.
Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, regardless of whether they want an EAD.
The Form I-765 application fee, or a fee waiver request, but only if they want an EAD. If the re-registrant does not want an EAD, no application fee is required.
Applicants may request that USCIS waive the Form I-765 application fee and/or biometrics fee based on an inability to pay. To do so, applicants must file a Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or submit a written request. Fee waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject the TPS application of any applicant who fails to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee waiver request.
All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.
Additional information on TPS for Haiti—including guidance on eligibility, the application process, and where to file—is available online at uscis.gov/tps. Further details about this extension of TPS for Haiti, including the application requirements and procedures, appear in a Federal Register notice published today.
Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online, or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).
For more information on USCIS and its programs, visit uscis.gov. Follow us on Facebook (/uscis), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

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USCIS Launches Spanish-Language myE-Verify and Expands Services
Release Date: August 31, 2015
myE-Verify combats fraud, protects identity, educates workers
WASHINGTON — U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) today announced the launch of a Spanish-language myE-Verify, plus the addition of Case Tracker and Case History services to the English and Spanish myE-Verify websites. myE-Verify is a one-stop shop for employees and job seekers to access features for identity protection in E-Verify and visibility into the E-Verify process.   
“Since its inception, myE-Verify has provided employees with valuable online tools and resources regarding the employment eligibility verification process,” said USCIS Director León Rodríguez. “We are delighted to rlease our myE-Verify services for our Spanish-language customers.”
myE-Verify gives U.S. workers and jobseekers a free and secure way to participate in the E-Verify process by accessing features dedicated to employees, including Self Lock, Self Check, Case History, Case Tracker and the Employee Rights Toolkit.
The new Spanish-language myE-Verify will also have the following services, which are currently  available on its English counterpart, launched in 2014:
myE-Verify accounts – Employees and job seekers in the U.S. can set up free and secure personal accounts to manage the use of their information in E-Verify and Self Check.
Self Lock – myE-Verify account holders can lock their Social Security numbers in E-Verify to prevent others from using their identities in E-Verify.
Self Check – Individuals can confirm their own employment eligibility by checking databases that E-Verify queries.
Resource Center – This section of the myE-Verify site contains information in multimedia formats to educate employees about their rights and the responsibilities of employers in the eligibility verification process.
myE-Verify is also introducing two new services. These new features are available nationwide in English and Spanish:
Case History – myE-Verify account holders can generate a report to see when their data was used in E-Verify.
Case Tracker – Individuals can track the status of their E-Verify case using the case verification number. While Case History does require users to create an account, Case Tracker does not.
To learn more about myE-Verify in English and Spanish, join us at a national engagement on September 10.
E-Verify is the free web-based service from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security used by over 600,000 employers to confirm the employment eligibility of people they hire.
For more information on E-Verify, visit www.dhs.gov/E-Verify; for myE-Verify, visit http://www.uscis.gov/myE-Verify.  For more information about USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon. 
 

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DHS Announces Temporary Protected Status Designation for Yemen
Release Date: September 03, 2015
WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson announced his decision to designate Yemen for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 18 months due to the ongoing armed conflict within the country. Yemen is experiencing widespread conflict and a resulting severe humanitarian emergency, and requiring Yemeni nationals in the United States to return to Yemen would pose a serious threat to their personal safety. As a result of Yemen’s designation for TPS, eligible nationals of Yemen residing in the United States may apply for TPS with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The Federal Register notice posted today provides details and procedures for applying for TPS.
The TPS designation for Yemen is effective September 3, 2015, and will be in effect through March 3, 2017. The designation means that, during the designated period, eligible nationals of Yemen (and people without nationality who last habitually resided in Yemen) who are approved for TPS will not be removed from the United States and may receive an Employment Authorization Document (EAD). The 180-day TPS registration period begins today and runs through March 1, 2016.
To be eligible for TPS, applicants must demonstrate that they satisfy all eligibility criteria, including that they have been both “continuously physically present” and “continuously residing” in the United States since September 3, 2015. Applicants also undergo thorough security checks. Individuals with certain criminal records or who pose a threat to national security are not eligible for TPS. The eligibility requirements are fully described in the Federal Register notices and on the TPS Web page at www.uscis.gov/tps.
Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all TPS-related fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject any TPS application that does not include the required filing fee or a properly documented fee-waiver request. All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.
Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833) at no cost.
For more information about USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook(/uscis), and the USCIS blog The Beacon.
This news release is also available in Arabic.

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USCIS Efforts in Florida Lead to Sentencing of 28 Marriage and Immigration Fraud Ring Participants
Release Date: September 15, 2015
Two Ringleaders Stripped of U.S. Citizenship
 
MIAMI – The efforts of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) led to the successful sentencing on August 24, 2015, of Inaldo Chavez of Hialeah, Caridad Baez of Hialeah, and Masiel Puron of Marathon following their pleas of guilty to various immigration fraud charges. The conspiracy’s organizers, Chavez and Baez, were sentenced to 21 months’ imprisonment and had their U.S. citizenship revoked and naturalization certificates canceled.  Recruiter Puron was sentenced to 10 months’ imprisonment. The other defendants were sentenced in June following their pleas of guilty to various immigration fraud charges. They received varying sentences. One other individual charged in the indictment remains a fugitive. Several undocumented individuals have been surrendered to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) for removal processing.
A USCIS Immigration Officer suspected fraud in some of the “green card” applications associated with this scheme and referred the case to USCIS’ Fraud Detection and National Security (FDNS) Directorate for investigation. FDNS Miami uncovered the conspiracy and worked with ICE agents to bring the case to prosecution.
“USCIS has no tolerance for immigration fraud,” said Linda Swacina, Director for the USCIS Miami District. “Anyone tempted to take advantage of America’s hospitality needs to understand that USCIS is committed to ensuring the integrity of our nation’s immigration system, and along with our law enforcement partners, will prosecute those committing fraud to the fullest extent of the law.” Ms. Swacina commended the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Florida for their vigorous pursuit of justice in this case.
According to court documents, between May 2011 and February 2014, organizers Chavez and Baez, and recruiters, including Puron, arranged for United States citizens and lawful permanent residents to enter into fraudulent marriages with foreign-born individuals for the purpose of evading the immigration laws of the United States. Chavez, Baez, and Puron charged the individuals a fee to arrange the fraudulent marriages, notarized the fraudulent marriage licenses, completed the necessary immigration paperwork, and prepared the co-conspirators for their interviews with USCIS. The United States citizen and lawful permanent resident co-conspirators also charged the individuals a fee to enter into the fraudulent marriages. These fraudulent marriages took place in the Southern District of Florida. In addition, during the time that they were arranging the fraudulent marriages, Chavez and Baez fraudulently obtained naturalization for themselves by lying about their illegal activities on their naturalization applications and during their naturalization interviews.
For more information about USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov

or follow us on Twitter (@uscis

), YouTube (/uscis

), Facebook(/uscis

), and the USCIS blog The Beacon

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Celebrating Constitution Day and Citizenship Day with Naturalization Ceremonies
Release Date: September 16, 2015
On Sept. 17, the nation observes Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, as part of Constitution Week. The commemoration honors both the signing of the Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, and an observance that began in 1940 as “I Am an American Day.”
Each year, USCIS celebrates this occasion with special naturalization ceremonies across the country. This year, we will welcome more than 36,000 new citizens in over 200 naturalization ceremonies between Sept. 17 and 23. A list of highlighted ceremonies is below.
We encourage you to share your ceremony experiences and photos via Twitter and other social media, using the hashtag #newUScitizen. You can also follow @USCIS on Twitter and Facebook.com/USCIS.
 
Date 
City, State
Location
Sept. 17, 2015
Fair Oaks, California
Lake Natoma Overlook
Sept. 17, 2015
Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles Central Public Library (children’s ceremony)
Sept. 17, 2015
Atlanta, Georgia
Turner Baseball Field, Home of the Atlanta Braves
Sept. 17, 2015
Clarkston, Georgia
Georgia Piedmont Technical College
Sept. 17, 2015
Flat Rock, North Carolina
Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site
Sept. 17, 2015
New York, New York
New York Historical Society
Sept. 17, 2015
New York, New York
Surrogate’s Court
Sept. 17, 2015
Miami, Florida
USCIS Miami Field Office
Sept. 17, 2015
Fairfax, Virginia
USCIS Washington Field Office
Sept. 17, 2015
Springfield, Massachusetts
Springfield Armory National Historic Site
Sept. 17, 2015
Brockport, New York
Seymour College, Union Ballroom
Sept. 17, 2015
Spokane, Washington
Bing Crosby Theater
Sept. 17, 2015
Asheville, North Carolina
U.S. District Courthouse
Sept. 17, 2015
Concord, New Hampshire
U.S. District Courthouse
Sept. 17, 2015
San Juan, Puerto Rico
U.S. District Courthouse
Sept. 17, 2015
Buffalo, New York
U.S. District Courthouse
Sept. 17, 2015
Providence, Rhode Island
Roger Williams National Memorial Park
Sept. 17, 2015
Washington, District of Columbia
National Archives and Records Administration
Sept. 17, 2015
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
National Constitution Center
Sept. 17, 2015
Portland, Maine
University of Southern Maine, Hannaford Hall
Sept. 17, 2015
Tumacacori, Arizona
Tumacacori National Historical Park
Sept. 17, 2015
Bridgeton, New Jersey
Cumberland County Superior Court
Sept. 17, 2015
Jersey City, New Jersey
Liberty State Park
Sept. 17, 2015
Moorhead, Minnesota
Minnesota State University, Comstock Memorial Ballroom
Sept. 17, 2015
Queens, New York
Rufus King Manor
Sept. 17, 2015
Alexandria, Virginia
Alexandria City Hall at Market Square
Sept. 17, 2015
Des Moines, Iowa
U.S. District Court
Sept. 17, 2015
Anchorage, Alaska
AJ Diamond High School
Sept. 17, 2015
St. Louis, Missouri
Old Custom Courthouse
Sept. 17, 2015
Syracuse, New York
Onondaga County Courthouse
Sept. 17, 2015
Syracuse, New York
U.S. District Court
Sept. 17, 2015
Beatrice, Nebraska
Beatrice Homestead National Park and Monument
Sept. 17, 2015
Shelburne, Vermont
Shelburne Museum
Sept. 17, 2015
Boise, Idaho
Nampa Civic Center
Sept. 17, 2015
Helena, Montana
Billings Montana Courthouse
Sept. 17, 2015
Salt Lake City, Utah
Heritage Park
Sept. 17, 2015
Sacramento, California
Ninth Circuit Court
Sept. 17, 2015
Wenatchee, Washington
Methow Kiwanis Park
Sept. 17, 2015
Rome, New York
Fort Stanwix National Monument Site
Sept. 17, 2015
Boston, Massachusetts
Faneuil Hall
Sept. 18, 2015
New Orleans, Louisiana
USCIS New Orleans Field Office
Sept. 18, 2015
Tampa, Florida
USCIS Tampa District Office
Sept. 18, 2015
Miramar, Florida
Miramar Library
Sept. 18, 2015
Miami, Florida
USCIS Miami Field Office
Sept. 18, 2015
Canyon, Texas
Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum
Sept. 18, 2015
Mount Holly, New Jersey
Burlington County Historic Courthouse
Sept. 18, 2015
Morristown, New Jersey
Morristown Historical Park
Sept. 18, 2015
Springfield, Massachusetts
Western New England University School of Law
Sept. 18, 2015
Manchester, New Hampshire
St. Anselm’s College, New Hampshire Institute of Politics
Sept. 19, 2015
Vienna, Virginia
Oakton High School
Sept. 19, 2015
Tahoma, Washington
Mt. Tahoma High School
Sept. 19, 2015
San Francisco, California
Angel Island Immigration Station
Sept. 19, 2015
Currie, North Carolina
Moores Creek National Battlefield
Sept. 19, 2015
Princeton, New Jersey
Westin Princeton at Forrestal Village
Sept. 21, 2015
DeLand, Florida
Stetson University
Sept. 22, 2015
Burien, Washington
King County Library (Burien Branch)
Sept. 23, 2015
San Diego, California
Wolf Lake Park
Sept. 23, 2015
Lawrence, Massachusetts
Campagnone Common
 

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USCIS to Welcome More Than 36,000 Citizens During Annual Constitution Day and Citizenship Day Celebrations
Release Date: September 17, 2015
Agency announces initiatives to highlight U.S. citizenship
 
WASHINGTON — U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is launching new efforts to highlight U.S. citizenship and immigrant civic integration to celebrate Constitution Day and Citizenship Day. These initiatives will also improve customer service and support aspiring citizens on their path to naturalization.
The initiatives include:
Naturalization Ceremonies
From Sept. 17-23, USCIS will welcome more than 36,000 new citizens during more than 200 naturalization ceremonies. During this time—also known as Constitution Week—museums, historic and public libraries, government landmarks and national park sites will provide the backdrop for our celebration of citizenship.  
Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is celebrated each year on Sept. 17 on the anniversary of the signing of the Constitution in 1787. Congress first highlighted the significance of U.S. citizenship in 1940 when it designated the third Sunday in May as “I Am an American Day.” In 1952, Congress shifted the date to Sept. 17 and renamed it “Citizenship Day.” Congress changed the designation of this day to “Constitution Day and Citizenship Day” in 2004.
USCIS invites new citizens and their families and friends to share their experiences from the ceremonies via social media using the hashtag #newUScitizen.

Read the list of featured 2015 Constitution Week naturalization ceremonies.
USCIS also announced today a renewed partnership with the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Park Service (NPS) to enhance the meaning and stature of citizenship ceremonies. Since the partnership first began in September 2006, USCIS has coordinated special naturalization ceremonies at many of the 400 NPS sites around the country, including eight events as part of USCIS’ 2015 Constitution Week celebration.
Customer Service Enhancements
Beginning Sept. 19, naturalization applicants will be able to use credit cards to pay the Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, fee of $595 and the biometrics fee of $85, if applicable. To pay using a credit card, customers may complete the new Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transaction.
USCIS will also enter into a formal partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the Farm Service Agency to provide temporary office space to USCIS. From there, USCIS officers will provide services to communities with significant numbers of immigrants who are not located near a USCIS office. Services will include biometrics collection, case interviews and information presentations.
Additionally, USCIS has developed new online tools to help lawful permanent residents prepare for naturalization, locate English and citizenship classes, determine eligibility and apply for naturalization. As an initial effort, a new interactive practice civics test is available in English, with other languages to follow. Individuals can also find English language and citizenship preparation classes in their local area using a new online class locator.
Grants Supporting Citizenship and Immigrant Integration
USCIS awarded nearly $10 million in grants to 40 organizations that will help lawful permanent residents (also known as green card holders) prepare and apply for citizenship. Located in 26 states, these organizations will receive funding to support citizenship preparation activities through September 2017. For more information, visit uscis.gov/grants.
Citizenship Public Education and Awareness
Beginning this month, USCIS will expand the Citizenship Public Education and Awareness Campaign, launched in July 2015, into six additional states – New Jersey, Illinois, Massachusetts, Virginia, Washington and Arizona. The 10 participating states are home to 75 percent of the country’s lawful permanent residents.  
USCIS also released a new series of print ads in Korean, Spanish and Tagalog, along with new widgets (small, online applications that can be embedded into Web pages or social media sites) in English and Spanish.
Outreach and Engagement with Local Governments
Today, USCIS announced new partnerships with Houston and Seattle and renewed partnerships with Chicago and the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee. With these announcements, USCIS now has a total of eight municipal partners. Through these partnerships, USCIS provides information and resources to help facilitate outreach and engagement, training and technical assistance, and citizenship education.
USCIS is also committed to supporting the White House’s Building Welcoming Communities Campaign. Welcoming communities are cities, counties or towns that strive to bring immigrants, refugees and native-born residents together to create a positive environment for all residents.
A key recommendation of the Task Force on New Americans’ action plan was to launch a campaign to support existing integration efforts, and encourage additional communities to develop and implement integration strategies tailored to their needs. USCIS’ first step in responding to this recommendation will be to provide guidance on citizenship education, citizenship outreach and avoiding immigration services scams.
For more information about USCIS, visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook(/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

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USCIS Expands Efforts to Highlight Citizenship and Immigrant Integration
Release Date: September 17, 2015
Initiatives Aim to Support Aspiring Citizens and Improve Customer Service
Introduction
On Nov. 20, 2014, as part of President Obama’s executive actions on immigration, Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson issued a memorandum directing U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to explore options to promote and increase access to naturalization. The memorandum also directed USCIS to consider innovative ways to address barriers to such access, including the inability to pay the naturalization application fees.
On Nov. 21, 2014, President Obama established the White House Task Force on New Americans, an interagency effort to develop a coordinated federal strategy to better integrate immigrants into communities and to support state and local efforts to do the same. Comprised of 16 federal departments, agencies, and White House offices, the Task Force is co-chaired by Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, and USCIS Director León Rodríguez. The Task Force submitted an action plan to President Obama in April 2015. This report establishes a federal immigrant integration strategy that allows new Americans to contribute to society to their fullest potential.
To celebrate Constitution Week and consistent with recommendations of the White House Task Force on New Americans, USCIS has developed a series of initiatives to improve customer service, highlight the importance of citizenship, and support aspiring citizens.
Citizenship Public Education and Awareness
According to the most recent estimates by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Immigration Statistics, 8.8 million permanent residents (green card holders) are eligible to apply for citizenship. The analysis showed that the median time spent as a permanent resident before becoming a U.S. citizen is seven years. Green card holders who meet all eligibility requirements may apply for citizenship after five years, or after three years if they are married to a U.S. citizen.
USCIS launched the Citizenship Public Education and Awareness Campaign in July 2015 in an effort to raise awareness about the rights, responsibilities and importance of U.S. citizenship, and provide information on the naturalization process and USCIS educational resources. The campaign began by targeting digital media markets in California, New York, Texas, and Florida. Beginning this month, USCIS will expand the campaign into six additional states – New Jersey, Illinois, Massachusetts, Virginia, Washington, and Arizona. Together, these 10 states are home to 75 percent of the country’s 13.3 million permanent residents.
USCIS has also released a new series of print ads in Korean, Spanish and Tagalog, along with new widgets (small, online applications that can be embedded into Web pages or social media sites) in English and Spanish.
These are some ways that community organizations can support the campaign:
Place a USCIS widget on their organization's website;
Link to the campaign’s resources on their website;
Distribute the campaign’s informational fliers to the public;
Post USCIS print advertisements (posters) in waiting areas, classrooms, community centers, educational facilities and other high-visibility areas;
Refer aspiring citizens to the Citizenship Resource Center; and
Inform local media outlets about the availability of USCIS radio and video PSAs.
In addition, USCIS will use its Electronic Immigration System to notify permanent residents about their potential eligibility for naturalization (through a pop-up message) when they seek to renew or replace a green card.
New for Constitution Week this year, USCIS is inviting people to share six-word essays describing what citizenship means to them, using the hashtag #citizenship6.
Grants Supporting Citizenship and Immigrant Integration
USCIS continues to help build community capacity to prepare immigrants for citizenship through the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program. Today, USCIS announced nearly $10 million in grants to 40 organizations that will help permanent residents prepare and apply for U.S. citizenship. Located in 26 states, these organizations will receive federal funding to support citizenship preparation services for permanent residents through September 2017. 
Since it began in 2009, the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program has awarded a total of $53 million through 262 competitive grants to public or private nonprofit organizations in 35 states and the District of Columbia. Now in its seventh year, the program has helped more than 122,000 permanent residents prepare for citizenship.
USCIS anticipates that approximately 25,000 permanent residents will receive citizenship preparation services by Sept. 30, 2017 as a result of the fiscal year (FY) 2015 awards issued through the grant program. An additional 12,000 permanent residents will be served under the ongoing FY 2014 program, which continues through Sept. 30, 2016.
For a full list of 2015 award recipients, visit uscis.gov/grants.
Outreach and Engagement with Municipal Governments
Since local communities play a critical role in welcoming and assisting immigrants, USCIS relies on state and local municipal partnerships to help educate immigrants about naturalization and lawful immigration. Through these partnerships, USCIS provides information and resources to support outreach and engagement, training and technical assistance, and citizenship education in communities. Today, USCIS announced new partnerships with Houston and Seattle and renewed partnerships with Chicago and the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee. With these announcements, USCIS now has a total of eight municipal partners.
Under these partnerships, USCIS has distributed more than 300,000 copies of educational materials on citizenship and the unauthorized practice of immigration law; established 330 citizenship corners in municipal facilities; conducted more than 20 naturalization information sessions; provided training on the naturalization process to library and other municipal staff members; aired USCIS educational videos and public service announcements on public broadcast stations; and conducted naturalization ceremonies at local government venues.
USCIS is also committed to supporting the White House’s Building Welcoming Communities Campaign. Welcoming communities are cities, counties or towns that strive to bring immigrants, refugees and U.S.-born residents together to create a positive environment for all. A key recommendation of the Task Force on New Americans’ action plan was to launch a campaign to support existing efforts and encourage additional communities to develop integration strategies tailored to their needs. As part of this effort, USCIS will provide technical assistance on citizenship education and outreach, and guidance on avoiding immigration services scams, to communities that commit to the campaign.
Customer Service Enhancements
Citizenship plays a critical role in immigrant integration. Recognizing the inherent value of citizenship to our nation, USCIS seeks to support aspiring citizens through a variety of customer service enhancements.
On Sept. 19, USCIS will begin accepting and processing credit card payments for the naturalization application and biometrics fee. Until now, the fees could only be paid with a check or money order. Many permanent residents who are eligible for citizenship may find it more convenient to pay naturalization fees using a credit card.
In agricultural and rural communities that have significant numbers of immigrants but are not located near a USCIS office, distance can be a barrier to completing naturalization and other immigration processes. In response, USCIS will enter into a formal partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the Farm Service Agency to provide temporary office space for USCIS officers in such communities. Services will include biometrics collection, interviews for applications or petitions, informational appointments, and general presentations on immigration benefits. This pilot project will help USCIS evaluate whether it can better serve customers in these communities through this kind of an arrangement. Earlier this month, USCIS also began live question-and-answer sessions on Twitter for customers to ask USCIS experts non-case specific questions.
Through the myUSCIS service, USCIS will develop new tools to help permanent residents prepare for the naturalization process, locate English and citizenship classes, determine naturalization eligibility, apply for naturalization, and much more. As an initial effort, a new interactive practice civics test is available in English, with other languages to follow. The practice test will help individuals prepare for the civics portion of the naturalization test. Individuals can also find English language and citizenship preparation classes in their local area using a new online class locator. In 2016, USCIS plans to offer applicants the ability to use myUSCIS to prepare and e-file Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, and Form N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship.
In addition, USCIS is working with other members of the Task Force on New Americans to expand the services and information provided to new citizens at naturalization ceremonies. For example, new citizens will now receive information from the Corporation for National and Community Service on volunteer service opportunities, and soon from the Small Business Administration on federal resources available to entrepreneurs, as well as the Department of Labor on training opportunities and worker rights.
Naturalization Ceremonies
As part of Constitution Week (Sept. 17-23) and in honor of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day (Sept. 17), USCIS will welcome more than 36,000 new citizens in more than 200 naturalization ceremonies across the country. During this week, museums, libraries, landmarks and national parks will provide the backdrops for our celebration of citizenship and the achievements of our newest U.S. citizens.
USCIS Director León Rodríguez provided congratulatory remarks to 30 new citizens at a Constitution Day and Citizenship Day naturalization ceremony at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 17.
Read the list of featured ceremonies.
USCIS also announced today a renewed partnership with the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Park Service (NPS) to enhance the meaning and stature of citizenship ceremonies. USCIS and NPS first signed the agreement in September 2006 to connect America’s newest citizens to national parks throughout the country. These historic and often picturesque sites provide an ideal backdrop for citizenship ceremonies. USCIS has coordinated special naturalization ceremonies at many of the 400 NPS sites around the country, including 8 events as part of USCIS’ 2015 Constitution Week celebration.
 
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