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Ian Petersen
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This is really neat.  I never would have guessed that the soil in Amazonia is nutrient poor (I'm assuming "Amazonia" is the place where you find the Amazon river and the Amazon rainforest).
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Michael Bay's new wildlife documentary is going to be epic. 
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Great video.  +Donna Buckles said the following in the OP's comments:

This is actually a well designed intervention for implicit bias. From what I've read you can't really move the needle on implicit bias by trying to logic yourself out of it because it doesn't operate at a conscious or logical level. You can make the decision to try to tackle your implicit bias for logical reasons but when it comes to actually trying to eliminate it you need to engage your emotions and your pattern recognition and other systems that don't run on reason.

So because this messes with pattern recognition and engages the emotions it's a pretty well-designed intervention.

I think that makes this video even more beautiful.
 
From the video description:

While the vast majority of Americans consider themselves unprejudiced, many of us unintentionally make snap judgments about people based on what we see—whether it’s race, age, gender, religion, sexuality, or disability. This may be a significant reason many people in the U.S. report they feel discriminated against. Subconscious prejudice—called “implicit bias”—has profound implications for how we view and interact with others who are different from us. It can hinder a person’s ability to find a job, secure a loan, rent an apartment, or get a fair trial, perpetuating disparities in American society. The Love Has No Labels campaign challenges us to open our eyes to our bias and prejudice and work to stop it in ourselves, our friends, our families, and our colleagues. Rethink your bias at lovehasnolabels.com.
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With every day that passes, I'm happier and happier that I circled +Geoffrey Snyder.  The post that made me interested had something to do with making fun of Republican voters' behaviour toward Obama, but I regularly see stuff like this in my stream because of him and every time I do, I'm happy all over again.

Yes, that's Putin riding the weasel that's riding the humming bird.  I'm surprised there's no one wearing a white and gold blue and black dress in this picture.
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Oh, right, +Kent Crispin, that makes a lot more sense.  I suppose there isn't a humming bird big enough to carry a weasel.
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A Child's Right to Choose!
 
Turns out some people get really mad when you talk about vaccinations…
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Holy balls this is a million kinds of awesome.  And look at the bodies on the dudes in the preview!  I would not mind looking like either of them (although it'd probably be surprising to wake up black).

The "Show More" button on YouTube reveals this text, which is pretty awesome in itself:

Mod Carousel, a Seattle based boylesque troupe, does a sexy parody of Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines music video.

It's our opinion that most attempts to show female objectification in the media by swapping the genders serve more to ridicule the male body than to highlight the extent to which women get objectified and do everyone a disservice. We made this video specifically to show a spectrum of sexuality as well as present both women and men in a positive light, one where objectifying men is more than alright and where women can be strong and sexy without negative repercussions.

+Kimberly Chapman, this might suit the mood of your gender issues-based circle.
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found it :P 
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Thought provoking.
 
// The novel "Seeing" by Jose Saramago tells the story of a country whose citizens suddenly refuse to vote. Voters turn up to the polls but 83% submit blank ballots.  

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/09/books/review/09rafferty.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

> This communal exercise of what the narrator calls "the simple right not to follow any consensually established opinion" does not sit well with the authorities; one cabinet minister refers to the electoral blank-out as "a depth charge launched against the system." 
...

It's a fairly witty conceit: a city full of Bartlebys, politely preferring not to do what is expected of them and generating, through simple negation, absolute panic in the corridors of power. 

The ruling party declares a state of emergency, then a state of siege; it deploys agents of the secret police to spy on citizens, then to haul them in for interrogations and lie-detector tests; and when none of those measures work, the wily prime minister decides to pull the entire apparatus of government out of the capital and leave the people to fend for themselves, on the theory that the resulting anarchy will return the prodigal voters to their senses and ultimately to the stern but reassuring paternal embrace of the state. Again the populace fails to cooperate: life in the capital remains peaceful and orderly, as if no one had even noticed that anything was missing.

// h/t +Jordan Peacock for the reference

I've advocated nonvoting as a form of political protest. I'm not anti-democratic, I just think that our system has broken past the point of legitimacy, past the point that voting can fix it. Not voting is my symbolic refusing to participate in an unjust system. I don't think my vote is worth anything more than a symbolic political gesture anyway, so I might as well use it to express my actual politics. 

https://plus.google.com/+DanielEstrada/posts/UZy4RaFAk7e

However, people tend to be both upset and offended at the suggestion that they shouldn't vote. So perhaps I can revise my suggestion to address some of these concerns and make the request more reasonable. 

Attached are images from Wikipedia on voter demographics in the 2008 election, where turnout was 57.1% of elegible voters. Around 229 million people were eligible to vote, and about 131 million actually voted. And as you can see, those voters tend to be white, educated, wealthy, and old. If you fall into any of these demographics, then you are over-represented in the voting booth. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voter_turnout_in_the_United_States_presidential_elections

Instead of advocating against voting entirely, perhaps it's better to advocate that people in these overrepresented demographics should voluntarily refrain from voting, if only to make the results more representative of the population as a whole. If we can encourage underrepresented persons to vote while discouraging over represented persons from voting, perhaps we can both express our dissatisfaction with the system as it stands, while still helping to improve it from within. An activist's win-win. 

In 2016, the VAP will be around 245 million, and if voter turnout is ~55% that means about 135 million people will vote. "Seeing" puts the line of political legitimacy at 17%, or around 41 million votes; reaching that line would require convincing almost 90 million people to submit blank ballots. That seems ambitious. Voter turnout has only dipped below 50% once since 1929, and that was in 1996, an incumbent election during a year of relative prosperity, the perfect storm of political apathy.

Could make voter turnout dip below 40%, not from apathy but as a deliberate political statement? This seems like a plausible goal that would still make a political point dramatic enough that might actually be heard in the halls of power. Below 40% turn out isn't enough to trigger a legitimacy crisis, but it is enough to make our dissatisfaction clear, and to demonstrate that we can still organize an effective, collective response. 40% of 245 million is 98 million votes; to dip below 40% we'd have to convince ~37 million people to submit blank ballots or just not show up. Surely there are 37 million people willing to use their vote to make an urgent political point in these desperate times. 

We could still encourage political engagement in other elections, reserving our protest only for the presidential election and the monied corruption it represents. If we organized carefully, we might even get voter turnout to dip below 40% without seriously disrupting the overall election results, by targeting states that vote reliably one way or the other and whose voters fall largely in these over-represented categories. 

If you are white, wealthy (>$50k/y), educated (have a college degree), or old (>55), then please, for the sake of the nation, don't vote for president. Your politics are already well represented in both the ballot box and in Washington. For the moment the country no longer requires your input. Please step aside gracefully, so we can fix this broken machine. 
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Haven't read the article, yet, but I think this might be the future.
 
Arati Prabhakar—director of the Pentagon's advanced research arm DARPA—has revealed a breakthrough achievement in machine mind control. Jan Scheuermann, a 55-year-old quadriplegic woman with electrodes in her brain, has been able to fly an F-35 fighter jet using "nothing but her thoughts."
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Ship.
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Nifty!

For those, like me, who don't know what he's talking about, the school listened to the message in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xe6nLVXEC0.
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This is the source of that Blurred Lines parody I shared earlier.  The post itself is great.  I share +K.G. Orphanides's opinion on the tea analogy, and I especially enjoyed the tea-themed video linked from the footnote, although it's got essentially nothing to do with consent, metaphors, or sex.
 
Best consent analogy ever. Involves tea. 10/10, would experience metaphor again.
A short one today as my life is currently very complicated and conspiring against my preference to spend all of my days working out what to blog. But do you know what isn't complicated? Consent. It...
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