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Ian Le Guillou
Works at Alzheimer's Society
Lives in London
8,252 followers|179,847 views
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Ian Le Guillou

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Study shows that chimpanzee violence against their own kind is completely natural and not a response to human interference.
The killings are often swift and brutal: An overwhelming force of chimpanzees will pin their fellow primate to the ground as dozens of attackers commence to biting, punching, kicking and ripping at the victim's body. ;
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After a year of making these images, I'm bowing out. In the past year they've been viewed over 950,000 times and I hope I've done my bit for educating people about animal research. The response to these images has been far greater than I ever thought and it just goes to show the power of visual content that is easily shared among people.
 
So what does a year of animal research look like? In celebration of our year-anniversary of "This Week in Animal Research" we bring you the following collage.
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 Running, jumping, flying: the science of animal locomotion shown in this video. Features real research footage from scientists at the Royal Veterinary College's Structure & Motion Lab.
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Praying mantises are the only insects known to have 3D vision, despite their limited brain power. Researchers are hoping to study the mantis's visual system to understand how it works and are hoping to use this in robotics and computer technology.

To do this they have created the world's smallest 3D glasses, with polarised lens just as we would have when watching a 3D film. By playing films of a fly buzzing around for the mantises, they hope to be able to tease apart the processes going on behind their sight.

Dr Vivek Nityananda, who is involved in the experiment at Newcastle University said: ‘If we find that the way mantises process 3D vision is very different to the way humans do it, then that could open up all kinds of possibilities to create much simpler algorithms for programming 3D vision into robots.
‘We can do this by fooling them into misjudging depth, in the same way that our brains are fooled when we watch a 3D movie.’
Scientists at Newcastle University are outfitting praying mantises with the world's smallest 3D glasses, to understand better how these notoriously dextrous predators perceive depth.
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Scientists have been able to grow muscles in the lab that is strong and can be grafted into mice.
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How do you deal with 2 X chromosomes?
Each cell can only deal with one X chromosome working. For males that's not a problem, but females need to choose between their two Xs: one from father, the other from mother. But the precise mechanism for this is still a mystery.

Scientists have now cross-bred two strains of mice: one with green X chromosomes and the other with red. Imaging the different cells in their offspring is helping to reveal unusual patterns. The image below shows the retinas of one mouse: from the left and the right. Yet as far as the X chromosome is concerned, they are almost completely from two different mice.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/21/science/seeing-x-chromosomes-in-a-new-light.html
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whats that??
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Dolphins get high by chewing a toxic puffer fish, which they pass to each other (on the left hand side)
Dolphins are thought of as one of the most intelligent species in the animal kingdom – and experts believe they have put their ingenuity to use in the pursuit of getting “high”.
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Don't bogard that puffer fish, my friend!
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Ian Le Guillou

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How a trip to the Natural History Museum got me thinking about protein structures.
Last weekend I went to see an exhibition on mammoths in the Natural History Museum in London (unfortunately now closed). The descriptions and posters did a very good job of explaining our current k...
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Although cancer is a global disease, the challenges in tackling it can be very different.
 
People in more developed countries are more likely to die from lung, breast, colorectal or prostate cancers. Thanks to animal research there have been many new treatments for these diseases, such as tamoxifen or Avastin, which have helped to lower mortality rates over the past 20 years.
 
People in less developed countries are heavily affected by stomach, liver and cervical cancers. These are often caused by infections and could be prevented by vaccines or antibiotics. These treatments have been developed through animal research and as they reach the people who need them most, they will prevent millions of cancer cases.
 
Link to high-res: http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/resources/image-library/1632/two-worlds-of-cancer/
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Researchers discover that an epigenetic marker can be used to activate nerve regeneration in the spinal cord.
Researchers have discovered how to trigger regeneration of nerves in damaged spinal cords
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Thankfully not an April Fool's prank - G+ to show number of total post views! This could be a big thing for brands trying to justify their social media activities and even start to move away from Facebook...
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2013's breakthroughs in dementia (according to the Express)
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That's demented!
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Have him in circles
8,252 people
Gabriele Ninci's profile photo
John Mccluskey's profile photo
Jaime Stark's profile photo
Lathan Kistler's profile photo
Uzair Khan's profile photo
Dante Sparda's profile photo
Arran McLellan's profile photo
Marc-André de Blois's profile photo
gord follett's profile photo
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Currently
London
Work
Occupation
Research Communications Officer
Employment
  • Alzheimer's Society
    Research Communications Officer, 2014 - present
  • Understanding Animal Research
    Science Writer, 2013 - 2014
  • Royal Society of Chemistry
    Science Writer Intern, 2012 - 2012
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Male