Profile

Cover photo
Ian Bosdet
Works at BC Cancer Agency
Attended University of British Columbia
Lived in Vancouver, B.C.
20,019 followers|1,264,637 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Probably getting close though...
13
3
Tempest Kitty's profile photoMartino Feldman (Cosmopsis Nibble)'s profile photoChris H.'s profile photoRichard McDonnell's profile photo
 
I <3 P2P
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
The 2015 World Cup has just begun

At press time, the U.S. national team was leading defending champions Germany in the World Cup’s opening match after being awarded 12 penalties in the game’s first three minutes.
ZURICH—After the Justice Department indicted numerous executives from world soccer’s governing body on charges of corruption and bribery, frantic and visibly nervous officials from FIFA held an impromptu press conference Wednesday to announce that the United States has been selected to host this summer’s 2015 World Cup.
2
Paul Carr's profile photoPat Cummings's profile photo
2 comments
 
Gotta love the Onion!
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
What this reporter failed to note is that this is a copy of policies developed by the Canadian Government (although it sounds less restrictive).

If someone asks you a question, any question, or you have the urge to say something, anything, then you must first fill in the form.  Once the form has been approved and signed off by your line manager, the communications committee and the Principal, you can say the words.
1
prapipun Patamong's profile photoRajini Rao's profile photo
2 comments
 
Haha, this should be in the Allium. http://www.theallium.com/
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Selecting a Medical Specialty

Based on some acquaintances I think this is actually how it works.
7
3
Bunny Evans's profile photoJim Benson's profile photoValdis Kletnieks's profile photoTodd Underwood's profile photo
3 comments
 
Don't forget control engineering then ^^!
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Right-To-Try laws: bad for patients

Right to try laws are being passed in many US states.  On the surface, these laws allow terminally-ill patients to access experimental drugs that may help them.  Hard to argue against that and not seem like a horrible person, but in the linked article below Orac outlines why these are more likely to cause harm to patients.  He, quite sensibly as usual, argues for support of the FDA's Compassionate Access program.  If you don't want to read the whole thing (you should) then here's what he's getting at:

The key difference between right-to-try and FDA compassionate use programs is that right-to-try strips pretty much all protections from patients who would use it; requires them to pay for the drug and any care related to the drug; prevents them from suing manufacturers and doctors if something goes wrong; prevents the state from taking action against the licenses of providers who give patients bad advice recommending right-to-try; tells insurance companies that, not only do they not have to pay for the investigational agent or device, but they don’t have to pay for any complications arising from use of the investigational agent or device; and makes doctors and other health care providers working for right-to-try states leery of advising too strongly against right-to-try, lest they be prosecuted for “blocking” access to experimental drugs. FDA compassionate use programs, in marked contrast, require review and oversight by an institutional review board (IRB). The other difference was that, although 99.5% of compassionate use/expanded access requests are approved by the FDA, the process was onerous. As Dr. Peppercorn points out, that is rapidly changing, arguably eliminating the “need” for right-to-try.
Last year, I did several posts on what I consider to be a profoundly misguided and potentially harmful type of law known as “right-to-try.” Beginning about a year and a half ago, promoted by the libertarian think tank known as the Goldwater Institute, right-to-try laws began popping up in state legislatures. I wrote about how…
7
5
Martin Vogel's profile photoPhilippe Salort's profile photoChristopher Lamke's profile photoMatthew Strain (Matt)'s profile photo
4 comments
 
Welcome to ZENOPHILE Magazine. https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PhillipJohnsonZENOPHILE/ http://ppireader.blogspot.com/ 
Every doctor should learn to assert themselves, there should be no shame in having to be neutral. Just say, "I don't know."
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
At 35, you have 20‑30 per cent chance of your frozen eggs creating a baby in the future, using IVF. At 42, it is 3.9 per cent
Women in their 30s and 40s exhibit a mix of wishful thinking and woeful ignorance when it comes to their fertility. Why?
1
2
Suzanne Catty's profile photoIan Bosdet's profile photoDouglas Pierre's profile photoClaudia W. Scholz's profile photo
2 comments
 
Sure, of course.  I just picked a quote that I just found most unexpected, but the piece is about much more than IVF.  The author speaks from experience, when she spoke with a doctor about trying to conceive in her early 40s.  The gist is that females are generally unaware of how their fertility changes over time and factors affecting it.  And, as above, a general misconception (ha) about how effective freezing eggs and IVF is for having children when you're older.
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
20,019 people
Frank Merchant's profile photo
Patrick Wagman's profile photo
Lars Falkdalen Lindahl's profile photo
Alec Brownstein's profile photo
li anni's profile photo
James Vigil's profile photo
Harry Van der Berg's profile photo
Jaime Stark's profile photo
Corry Andrews's profile photo

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
At press time, residents of the only economically advanced nation in the world where roughly two mass shootings have occurred every month for the past five years were referring to themselves and their situation as “helpless .”
ISLA VISTA, CA—In the days following a violent rampage in southern California in which a lone attacker killed seven individuals, including himself, and seriously injured over a dozen others, citizens living in the only country where this kind of mas...
8
1
James McGoram's profile photoPat Cummings's profile photoNeil Mcginnis's profile photo
2 comments
 
Gotta love the Onion...
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nothing On
3
Tom Nathe's profile photoSteve Esterly's profile photo
2 comments
 
Yup, everything's on, including two nothings
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wow - Google Photos will now give you unlimited space for photos up to 16MP in size (and 1080p videos).  Certainly giving Flickr's 1TB of space some competition.
3
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Medicine  - 
 
 
Right-To-Try laws: bad for patients

Right to try laws are being passed in many US states.  On the surface, these laws allow terminally-ill patients to access experimental drugs that may help them.  Hard to argue against that and not seem like a horrible person, but in the linked article below Orac outlines why these are more likely to cause harm to patients.  He, quite sensibly as usual, argues for support of the FDA's Compassionate Access program.  If you don't want to read the whole thing (you should) then here's what he's getting at:

The key difference between right-to-try and FDA compassionate use programs is that right-to-try strips pretty much all protections from patients who would use it; requires them to pay for the drug and any care related to the drug; prevents them from suing manufacturers and doctors if something goes wrong; prevents the state from taking action against the licenses of providers who give patients bad advice recommending right-to-try; tells insurance companies that, not only do they not have to pay for the investigational agent or device, but they don’t have to pay for any complications arising from use of the investigational agent or device; and makes doctors and other health care providers working for right-to-try states leery of advising too strongly against right-to-try, lest they be prosecuted for “blocking” access to experimental drugs. FDA compassionate use programs, in marked contrast, require review and oversight by an institutional review board (IRB). The other difference was that, although 99.5% of compassionate use/expanded access requests are approved by the FDA, the process was onerous. As Dr. Peppercorn points out, that is rapidly changing, arguably eliminating the “need” for right-to-try.
Last year, I did several posts on what I consider to be a profoundly misguided and potentially harmful type of law known as “right-to-try.” Beginning about a year and a half ago, promoted by the libertarian think tank known as the Goldwater Institute, right-to-try laws began popping up in state legislatures. I wrote about how…
4 comments on original post
8
rare avis's profile photoDouglas Kalles's profile photo
2 comments
 
+rare avis nah dude, the concept does seem kind of cool, but I think this guys article here lretty adequately pointed out all the ways America is fucking it up...
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Sad news about BB.  I hope Lucille is well taken care of.
Giants of the music world are remembering the life of late blues musician B.B. King, considered one of the greatest guitarists of all time, after his death late Thursday at his Las Vegas home. He was 89.
1
Add a comment...

Ian Bosdet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Thing Explainer

So awesome.  Randall Munroe is releasing a new book called Thing Explainer.  I have his previous book What If and it is a fantastic read.  Too bad we have to wait until November to see this one.

"In Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words, things are explained in the style of Up Goer Five, using only drawings and a vocabulary of the 1,000 (or "ten hundred") most common words. Explore computer buildings (datacenters), the flat rocks we live on (tectonic plates), the things you use to steer a plane (airliner cockpit controls), and the little bags of water you're made of (cells)."
6
Chris Mak's profile photoIan Bosdet's profile photo
2 comments
 
Yes, +Chris Mak.  That comic was just brilliant.  I particularly liked the description of the engine outlets at the bottom of the rocket: 

"This end should point toward the ground if you want to go to space.  If it starts pointing towards space you are having a bad problem and you will not go to space today."
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
20,019 people
Frank Merchant's profile photo
Patrick Wagman's profile photo
Lars Falkdalen Lindahl's profile photo
Alec Brownstein's profile photo
li anni's profile photo
James Vigil's profile photo
Harry Van der Berg's profile photo
Jaime Stark's profile photo
Corry Andrews's profile photo
Education
  • University of British Columbia
    PhD, Genetics
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Story
Tagline
Molecular Geneticist
Introduction
I'm a Molecular Geneticist specializing in cancer genetics.  My primary area of interest is applications of next-generation sequencing to clinical diagnostics.  I work mostly with non-small cell lung cancers and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer but our lab does a little bit (or a lot) of everything.
Bragging rights
I'm wild-type at many loci
Work
Occupation
Molecular Geneticist
Employment
  • BC Cancer Agency
    Clinical Molecular Geneticist, present
  • University of British Columbia
    Clinical Assistant Professor, present
  • Children's and Women's Health Centre of BC
    Fellow, 2012 - 2014
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Vancouver, B.C.