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Nikon Europe
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Nikon. At the heart of the image.
Nikon. At the heart of the image.

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Nikon Europe's posts

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This #TravelTuesday, we head to Casina Vanvitelliana in Bacoli, #Italy just before #sunset. Is it time to travel? Yes it is! Don't forget to pack your #Nikon. 😄 Nicola D'Orso with a #NikonD7000 + #NIKKOR12-24mm f/4 @ f 6 | 22 mm | 4/1 sec | ISO 100 http://bit.ly/2oI3msK
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When getting started with #macro #photography, choosing the correct depth of field to get your desired result is key. Macro photographer Alberto Ghizzi Panizza says that “Finding the right combination between the sharpness of the subject and a pleasant blurry background is one of the most interesting and challenging aspects of macro photography.” To help achieve your desired result, try using the depth of field preview button found near the lens on most Nikon DSLRs. This will show you, though your view finder, what your depth of field will be based on the aperture you’ve chosen.

#NikonD800E + AF-S #Micro-#NIKKOR60mm f/2.8 @ f/16 | 60mm | 0.6s | ISO 100 #macrophotography #TopTipTuesday #tips
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Looking for a good #macro #lens to start #macrophotography? We recommend the #NIKKOR40mm f/2.8G http://bit.ly/NIKKOR_40mm
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If you want to hone in on the details of spring, like dewy leaves or tiny insects, you may want to decrease your depth of field, and blur out distractions. But what is depth of field? Depth of field is the distance between the nearest and furthest point in your photo that is in focus. A narrow depth of field creates the blurry background found in images with a bokeh effect. There are three main things that affect depth of field:

1. Aperture: A narrow aperture (larger number) will increase your depth of field, and a wide aperture (smaller number) will decrease it
2. Focal length: The focal length of your lens will also affect your depth of field. As a general rule, the longer your focal length is, the shallower your depth of field will be
3. Sensor size: Smaller sensors, such as those found in point and shoot cameras, have a larger depth of field while larger sensors, such as those found in DSLRs, have smaller ones
4. The distance of the subject: the closer the subject, the shallower the depth of field will be. The further away the subject is, the wider the depth of field

(Credit: Alberto Ghizzi Panizza with a #Nikon D500 + #MICRO-#NIKKOR AF 200mm f/4 D ED IF @ f/16 | 1/40s | ISO 100) #Tip #opTipTuesday #macro #macrophotography www.albertoghizzipanizza.com
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#NikonEuropeanAmbassador Kadir van Lohuizen took this photo of a woman harvesting the seed of water plants in Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. Inhabitants of this region face serious issues due to rising sea levels. See more of Kadir, and other Nikon Ambassadors' work, on our website http://bit.ly/NikonAmb_KL
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#TravelTuesday takes us to this fairy tale-like scene of a wintry, moonlit night in this sleepy town under clear skies. Where do you think this is? Credit: Pietro D'ambrosio with a #NikonD750 + #NIKKOR24-70mm f/2.8 @ f 2.8 | 35 mm | 13/1 sec | ISO 64 http://bit.ly/2qacUwP
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If you want to hone in on the details of spring, like dewy leaves or tiny insects, you may want to decrease your depth of field, and blur out distractions. But what is depth of field? Depth of field is the distance between the nearest and furthest point in your photo that is in focus. A narrow depth of field creates the blurry background found in images with a bokeh effect. There are three main things that affect depth of field:

1. Aperture: A narrow aperture (larger number) will increase your depth of field, and a wide aperture (smaller number) will decrease it
2. Focal length: The focal length of your lens will also affect your depth of field. As a general rule, the longer your focal length is, the shallower your depth of field will be
3. Sensor size: Smaller sensors, such as those found in point and shoot cameras, have a larger depth of field while larger sensors, such as those found in DSLRs, have smaller ones
4. The distance of the subject: the closer the subject, the shallower the depth of field will be. The further away the subject is, the wider the depth of field

(Credit: Alberto Ghizzi Panizza with a #Nikon D500 + #MICRO-#NIKKOR AF 200mm f/4 D ED IF @ f/16 | 1/40s | ISO 100) #TopTipTuesday #macro #photography www.albertoghizzipanizza.com
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#Dance in motion as interpreted by Manuel Cafini with a #NikonD700 + 24-70mm f/2.8 @ f 13 | 32 mm | 18/10 sec | ISO 320 http://bit.ly/2pdXk3X #PhotoOfTheDay
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Go far, travel light & never stop chasing what you seek. With a 20.9MP SX-CMOS sensor, 51-point AF and 4K UHD video, the new #NikonD7500 is your perfect partner for capturing the unmissable wherever your journey takes you https://goo.gl/Ojk9RS
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#NikonEuropeanAmbassador Vincent Munier specialises in wildlife and outdoor imagery. His love for photography began when he was 12 years old, spending much of his youth capturing wildlife in the local forests. Here is his image of emperor penguins, hidden amidst fog in Antarctica. Learn more about Vincent, and other Nikon Ambassadors, on our website http://bit.ly/NikonAmb_VM
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