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Hubble Space Telescope
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Join Hubble's journey of cosmic discovery.
Join Hubble's journey of cosmic discovery.

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The Hubble Space Telescope has detected, for the first time, infrared radiation from a nearby neutron star, cataloged RX J0806.4-4123. This might be from dust in an 18 billion-mile-wide circumstellar disk. This so-called "fallback disk" could be material that coalesced around the neutron star after the supernova that preceded it. Or, it could be from shocks from a ferocious wind of subatomic particles blasted off the neutron star by lethal magnetic fields, slamming into interstellar gas. http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-43
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A new Hubble observing campaign, called Beyond Ultra-deep Frontier Fields And Legacy Observations (BUFFALO), will boldly expand the space telescope’s view into largely uncharted regions adjoining several massive galaxy clusters previously observed by Hubble. This survey is designed to identify the abundance of galaxies in their earliest stages of formation, less than 800 million years after the big bang. http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-39
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Nearly all of the Hubble Space Telescope’s dazzling images of the universe have been prepared with the skills of Zoltan Levay, in the STScI Office of Public Outreach. Levay is retiring now to pursue his hobby of photography on a more earth-bound plane. He leaves behind a 25-year-long legacy of several thousand wondrous celestial landscapes that blend art and science to capture the wonder and mystery of our universe. Read our tribute: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-41
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By combining Hubble’s ultraviolet capability with infrared and visible-light data from Hubble and other space- and ground-based telescopes, scientists have just assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits of the universe’s evolutionary history. Because Earth’s atmosphere filters most ultraviolet light, Hubble can provide some of the most sensitive space-based ultraviolet observations possible, revealing new details about star birth and galaxy evolution. Read more: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-35
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As Saturn and Mars ventured close to Earth, Hubble captured their portraits in June and July 2018, respectively. The telescope photographed the planets near opposition, when the Sun, Earth and an outer planet are lined up, with Earth sitting in between the Sun and the outer planet. Around the time of opposition, a planet is at its closest distance to Earth in its orbit. Hubble viewed Saturn on June 6, when the ringed world was approximately 1.36 billion miles from Earth, as it approached a June 27 opposition. Mars was captured on July 18, at just 36.9 million miles from Earth, near its July 27 opposition. Hubble saw the planets during summertime in Saturn’s northern hemisphere and springtime in Mars’ southern hemisphere. The increase in sunlight in Saturn’s northern hemisphere heated the atmosphere and triggered a large storm that is now disintegrating in Saturn’s northern polar region. On Mars, a spring dust storm erupted in the southern hemisphere and ballooned into a global event enshrouding the entire planet. http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-29
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The universe is rapidly and uniformly expanding—but how fast remains a subject of debate. Now, combining the power of the Hubble and Gaia space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement to date of the universe’s expansion rate.These results further fuel the mismatch between measurements for the expansion rate of the nearby universe, and those of the distant, primeval universe—before stars and galaxies even existed. This so-called “tension” implies that there could be new physics underlying the foundations of the universe. http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-34
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The mysterious interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua is acting more like a comet than an asteroid. http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-25
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Helium is the second most common element in the universe, and is expected to be a major component of gaseous planets. Astronomers using Hubble have detected helium on an exoplanet for the first time. Helium is streaming away from WASP-107b to form a comet-like tail as that planet is roasted in a tight orbit around its star.
WASP-107b, shown in this artist’s conception, is one of the puffiest planets known. It has a diameter like Jupiter’s but weighs only one-tenth as much. Read more: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-26
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Seventeen years ago, astronomers witnessed a supernova go off in the galaxy called NGC 7424, located 40 million light-years away in the southern constellation Grus, the Crane. Now, in the fading afterglow of that explosion, Hubble has captured the first image of a surviving companion to a supernova. This picture is compelling evidence that some supernovas originate in double-star systems.
The companion to the supernova’s progenitor star was no innocent bystander to the explosion. It siphoned off almost all of the hydrogen from the doomed star’s outer layers. As a result, the supernova, called SN 2001ig, is categorized as a Type IIb supernova. Read more: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-20
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Seeing the first galaxies is difficult. Seeing individual first stars is impossible, even for the James Webb Space Telescope—unless it gets a little boost from Einstein. New research suggests that gravitational lensing by a cluster like Abell 2744, pictured here, could bring the first stars into the realm of visibility. Read more: http://webbtelescope.org/articles/2018-23
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