Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Herbsea Nutra
21 followers -
Herbsea™ Nutra specializes in developing and producing unique health and beauty products for those who live a life of exceptional excellence
Herbsea™ Nutra specializes in developing and producing unique health and beauty products for those who live a life of exceptional excellence

21 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
September is National Cholesterol Education Month
It doesn’t matter how young you may be or how physically fit, strong and agile you are. It also doesn’t matter if you don’t smoke and have a relatively healthy lifestyle. High cholesterol can be inherited.

More than 102 million American adults (20 years or older) have total cholesterol levels at or above 200 mg/dL, which is above healthy levels. More than 35 million of these people have levels of 240 mg/dL or higher, which puts them at high risk for heart disease. Further, children and adolescents are more at risk than ever for developing high cholesterol, and their risk increases as their weight increases. Unfortunately, in the US, more than one-fifth of children aged 12 to 19 have at least one unhealthy (high) lipid level. According to buff.ly/2x2Z719, parents should have pediatricians check the cholesterol levels of their children as young as age two and older, especially if they are overweight and/or have a family history of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure or other conditions that may impact cholesterol metabolism.

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that in normal levels helps the body function normally. The liver produces approximately 1,000 milligrams of cholesterol each day – cholesterol is also consumed in foods. In some people, the liver manufactures higher amounts. Therefore, lowering cholesterol can be accomplished through diet and supplementation. Because too much cholesterol over time leads to arteriosclerosis or hardening of the arteries, which is a condition that may increase risk of heart attack and stroke.

There are two main types of cholesterol – like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the unhealthy type that can build up on arterial walls that lead to the brain and heart. This buildup hardens and forms plaque, causing bloodflow to be restricted and increases risk of blood clog formation.

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is the healthy cholesterol that ferries the actual cholesterol molecule away from the arteries and back into the liver where it is processed for removal by the body.

Foods to cut down or out (if you can) that are high in LDL cholesterol include egg yolks, meats (such as pork, steaks and deli meats), shrimp and dairy (milk, cheese and ice creams). The good news is there are many new and tasty plant-based foods and alternatives to eat instead.

Levels deemed healthy are: less than 170mg/dL total cholesterol, less than 110 mg/dL low-density lipoprotein (“bad” or LDL), less than 150 mg/dL triglycerides, and 35 mg/dL or higher high-density lipoprotein (“good” or HDL). These are established via a simple blood test.

September is National Cholesterol Education Month, a good time for you and your family to get cholesterol checkups and take steps to ensure levels are in healthy ranges if they are high.

Omega 3 EFAs – eicosapentanoic acid (EPA and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) – have been shown in multiple studies to have a positive impact on cholesterol levels, along with a healthy diet (touched upon above). The good news is twofold: one, you can take control and lower your cholesterol levels to healthy ranges and two, you can help your body further by taking Fucosea family, a wholesome, whole-food dietary supplement that contains naturally occurring omega-3 EFAs.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
September is National Cholesterol Education Month
It doesn’t matter how young you may be or how physically fit, strong and agile you are. It also doesn’t matter if you don’t smoke and have a relatively healthy lifestyle. High cholesterol can be inherited.

More than 102 million American adults (20 years or older) have total cholesterol levels at or above 200 mg/dL, which is above healthy levels. More than 35 million of these people have levels of 240 mg/dL or higher, which puts them at high risk for heart disease. Further, children and adolescents are more at risk than ever for developing high cholesterol, and their risk increases as their weight increases. Unfortunately, in the US, more than one-fifth of children aged 12 to 19 have at least one unhealthy (high) lipid level. According to www.kidshealth.org, parents should have pediatricians check the cholesterol levels of their children as young as age two and older, especially if they are overweight and/or have a family history of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure or other conditions that may impact cholesterol metabolism.

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that in normal levels helps the body function normally. The liver produces approximately 1,000 milligrams of cholesterol each day – cholesterol is also consumed in foods. In some people, the liver manufactures higher amounts. Therefore, lowering cholesterol can be accomplished through diet and supplementation. Because too much cholesterol over time leads to arteriosclerosis or hardening of the arteries, which is a condition that may increase risk of heart attack and stroke.

There are two main types of cholesterol – like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the unhealthy type that can build up on arterial walls that lead to the brain and heart. This buildup hardens and forms plaque, causing bloodflow to be restricted and increases risk of blood clog formation.

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is the healthy cholesterol that ferries the actual cholesterol molecule away from the arteries and back into the liver where it is processed for removal by the body.

Foods to cut down or out (if you can) that are high in LDL cholesterol include egg yolks, meats (such as pork, steaks and deli meats), shrimp and dairy (milk, cheese and ice creams). The good news is there are many new and tasty plant-based foods and alternatives to eat instead.

Levels deemed healthy are: less than 170mg/dL total cholesterol, less than 110 mg/dL low-density lipoprotein (“bad” or LDL), less than 150 mg/dL triglycerides, and 35 mg/dL or higher high-density lipoprotein (“good” or HDL). These are established via a simple blood test.

September is National Cholesterol Education Month, a good time for you and your family to get cholesterol checkups and take steps to ensure levels are in healthy ranges if they are high.

Omega 3 EFAs – eicosapentanoic acid (EPA and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) – have been shown in multiple studies to have a positive impact on cholesterol levels, along with a healthy diet (touched upon above). The good news is twofold: one, you can take control and lower your cholesterol levels to healthy ranges and two, you can help your body further by taking Fucosea family, a wholesome, whole-food dietary supplement that contains naturally occurring omega-3 EFAs.

Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Studies Show How Sleep Affects Cardiovascular Health

We can never under-estimate the importance of regular healthy sleep. New research presented in late August at the European Society of Cariology Congress 2018 shows that obtaining fewer than six hours of sleep, or sleep that is characterized by frequent waking up are associated with an increased risk of asymptomatic atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries.

Medical scientists have known that poor sleeping habits have negative impacts on the cardiovascular system as well as on other aspects of health including mental health.

The Progression of Early Subclinical Atherosclerosis (PESA) study examined sleep habits of 3,974 healthy middle-aged adults who wore a waistband activity monitor for seven days to record sleep quality and quantity. After adjusting for various considerations, the researchers found that very short-amount sleepers had significantly more atherosclerosis than those who got seven to eight hours. Those in the highest quintile (upper 25%) of fragmented sleep were more likely to have multiple sections of arteries with atherosclerosis compared to those in the lowest 25%.

Study author Dr Fernando Dominguez said: "People who had short or disrupted sleep were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome, which refers to the combination of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity, and depicts an unhealthy lifestyle. Failure to get enough sleep and restlessness during the night should be considered risk factors for blocking or narrowing of the arteries. Studies are needed to find out if sleeping well and long enough can prevent or reverse this effect on the arteries. In the meantime it seems sensible to take steps to get a good night's sleep -- such as having a physically active lifestyle and avoiding coffee and fatty foods before bedtime."

Another study also presented at the ESC Congress 2018 found that middle-aged men who get fewer than five hours of sleep per night have twice the risk of developing a major cardiovascular event during the following two decades than men who sleep seven to eight hours. This study, which began in 1993, investigated this relationship in 759 50-year-old men, who were divided into four groups according to their self-estimated average sleep duration at the start of the study: five or less hours, six hours, seven to eight hours (considered normal sleep duration), and more than eight hours.

Participants were followed-up for 21 years for the occurrence of major cardiovascular events, which included heart attack, stroke, hospitalization due to heart failure, coronary revascularization, or death from cardiovascular disease.

According to study author Study author Moa Bengtsson, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, current smoking, low physical activity, and poor sleep quality were more common in men who slept five or fewer hours per night compared to those who got seven to eight hours of sleep.

Compared to those with normal sleep duration, men who slept five or fewer hours per night had a two-fold higher risk of having a major cardiovascular event by age 71. The risk remained doubled after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors at the start of the study including obesity, diabetes, and smoking.

"Men with the shortest sleep duration at the age of 50 were twice as likely to have had a cardiovascular event by age 71 than those who slept a normal amount, even when other risk factors were taken into account,” explained Bengtsson. "In our study, the magnitude of increased cardiovascular risk associated with insufficient sleep is similar to that of smoking or having diabetes at age 50."

Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Dietary Supplement Use Can Save HealthCare Costs

What once started as a primarily small movement, natural foods and dietary supplements grew into mainstream consumer routine, globally. A report by Frost & Sullivan has broken down key points from its extensive market research as to how big the market is for preventative (supplement) health practices.

Nearly 75% of total US expenditures on healthcare is spent on diseases that are preventable – yet only a mere 3% of total healthcare expenditures are geared for disease prevention.

A common question among policymakers, public health experts, and consumers is whether health care treatment costs can be avoided if more preventive measures are adopted. A significant amount of scientific research has been conducted examining dietary supplements, and many studies demonstrate that these supplements have a positive effect on reducing the risk of a disease event.

Frost & Sullivan examined the potential health care cost savings if people over the age of 55 at risk of those diseases use certain dietary supplements that have been shown to lower those disease risks.

Examining hundreds of studies of all types (epidemiological, in vitro and human clinicals), Frost & Sullivan’s team found eight supplements that if taken regularly have significant causal relationship with incidence of specific health conditions, risk of which tend to increase through aging. Specifically:


1. Psyllium: According to the report, “an average annual total savings of $4.38 billion per year from 2013 to 2020 is potentially realizable if all US adults over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD were to use preventive intake levels of psyllium fiber.”

2. Phytosterols: An average of $4.23 billion per year in avoidable hospital utilization costs may be saved if all U.S. adults over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD were to consume phytosterols.

3. Omega-3: Approximately $4 billion in cumulative net CHD-attributed cost savings from 2013 to 2020 may be realized if the entire target population (U.S. adults over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD) were to take Omega-3 EFAs.

4. B Vitamins: A cumulative 808,225 CHD-related medical events occurring in seven years (ending in 2020) could be avoided if all Americans 55 with CHD consumed B vitamins folic acid, B6, and B12.

5. Chromium Picolinate: Also in seven years ending in 2020, approximately 650,000 CHD-related medical events may be avoided if all American diabetics over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD were to take chromium picolinate.

6. Lutein and Zeaxanthin: An average of $3.87 billion per year in avoidable health care costs may be saved if Americans over the age of 55 diagnosed with ARED (age-related macular degeneration) were to take lutein and zeaxanthin dietary supplements.

7. • Calcium and Vitamin D: More than $12 billion in cumulative net osteoporosis-attributed cost savings may be realized if all American women over the age of 55 diagnosed with osteoporosis were to consume calcium and vitamin D dietary supplements.

8. Magnesium: A cumulative savings of $6.8 billion in seven years ending in 2020 in avoidable hospital utilization costs is potentially realizable if all American women 55 and older diagnosed with were to consume magnesium dietary supplements.

We applaud this research as it demonstrates clearly that dietary supplements do indeed work to keep humans healthy and to satisfactorily address health concerns among men and women in all life stages. For more information, visit buff.ly/2NbrmDW.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Dietary Supplement Use Can Save HealthCare Costs

What once started as a primarily small movement, natural foods and dietary supplements grew into mainstream consumer routine, globally. A report by Frost & Sullivan has broken down key points from its extensive market research as to how big the market is for preventative (supplement) health practices.

Nearly 75% of total US expenditures on healthcare is spent on diseases that are preventable – yet only a mere 3% of total healthcare expenditures are geared for disease prevention.

A common question among policymakers, public health experts, and consumers is whether health care treatment costs can be avoided if more preventive measures are adopted. A significant amount of scientific research has been conducted examining dietary supplements, and many studies demonstrate that these supplements have a positive effect on reducing the risk of a disease event.

Frost & Sullivan examined the potential health care cost savings if people over the age of 55 at risk of those diseases use certain dietary supplements that have been shown to lower those disease risks.

Examining hundreds of studies of all types (epidemiological, in vitro and human clinicals), Frost & Sullivan’s team found eight supplements that if taken regularly have significant causal relationship with incidence of specific health conditions, risk of which tend to increase through aging. Specifically:


1. Psyllium: According to the report, “an average annual total savings of $4.38 billion per year from 2013 to 2020 is potentially realizable if all US adults over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD were to use preventive intake levels of psyllium fiber.”

2. Phytosterols: An average of $4.23 billion per year in avoidable hospital utilization costs may be saved if all U.S. adults over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD were to consume phytosterols.

3. Omega-3: Approximately $4 billion in cumulative net CHD-attributed cost savings from 2013 to 2020 may be realized if the entire target population (U.S. adults over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD) were to take Omega-3 EFAs.

4. B Vitamins: A cumulative 808,225 CHD-related medical events occurring in seven years (ending in 2020) could be avoided if all Americans 55 with CHD consumed B vitamins folic acid, B6, and B12.

5. Chromium Picolinate: Also in seven years ending in 2020, approximately 650,000 CHD-related medical events may be avoided if all American diabetics over the age of 55 diagnosed with CHD were to take chromium picolinate.

6. Lutein and Zeaxanthin: An average of $3.87 billion per year in avoidable health care costs may be saved if Americans over the age of 55 diagnosed with ARED (age-related macular degeneration) were to take lutein and zeaxanthin dietary supplements.

7. • Calcium and Vitamin D: More than $12 billion in cumulative net osteoporosis-attributed cost savings may be realized if all American women over the age of 55 diagnosed with osteoporosis were to consume calcium and vitamin D dietary supplements.

8. Magnesium: A cumulative savings of $6.8 billion in seven years ending in 2020 in avoidable hospital utilization costs is potentially realizable if all American women 55 and older diagnosed with were to consume magnesium dietary supplements.

We applaud this research as it demonstrates clearly that dietary supplements do indeed work to keep humans healthy and to satisfactorily address health concerns among men and women in all life stages. For more information, visit www.supplementforsmartprevention.org.

Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Seeking Healthy Weight? Carbs in Moderation, not “Low”

Americans tend to be an “all or nothing” society. So when “low carb” became the trendy diet to lose weight, people took “reducing carb intake” to very extreme levels – much like this diet’s pre-decessor, the low-fat diet, which left a lot of people deficient in the good fats they needed as they sacrificed all fats. This diet was later debunked by the medical community and deemed unhealthy.

Although low-carb is not as unhealthy as “low fat,” moderation, as with everything else it seems, seems to be better for promoting health and longevity, according to new research published The Lancet Public Health.

The scientists reviewed data from more than 15,400 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) found that diets both low (less than 40% energy) and high (more than 70% energy) in carbohydrates influenced an increase in mortality, while those who consumed moderate carbs (50-55% of energy) had the lowest risk of mortality.
These findings were supported by data from a meta-analysis (second part of this study) focusing on carbohydrate intake of more than 432,000 individuals from over 20 countries, which also suggests that not all low-carbohydrate diets were the same. Fat source had a distinct influence: eating more animal-based proteins and fats instead of carbohydrates was associated with a greater risk of mortality. Conversely, eating more plant-based proteins and fats was linked to lower mortality.

"Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with protein or fat are gaining widespread popularity as a health and weight loss strategy,” noted lead author Dr. Sara Seidelmann. “However, our data suggests that animal-based low carbohydrate diets, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, might be associated with shorter overall life span and should be discouraged. Instead, if one chooses to follow a low carbohydrate diet, then exchanging carbohydrates for more plant-based fats and proteins might actually promote healthy aging in the long term."

Previous trials have shown low carbohydrate diets are effective for short-term weight loss and can also improve cardiometabolic risk.
"These findings bring together several strands that have been controversial. Too much and too little carbohydrate can be harmful but what counts most is the type of fat, protein, and carbohydrate," says co-author Walter Willett, Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.
This research is very relevant as the “keto diet” continues to sweep the nation with more and more followers, devotees and “keto” products. The “keto” diet is very similar to its popular predecessor the Atkins diet. The keto diet of which there are several variations, tend to focus on high fat (good fat) consumption, mid-range protein consumption and very low carb consumption. This diet forces the body to burn fats instead of carbohydrates.
Proponents of the Keto diet point to studies showing multiple health benefits – and no hunger/cravings.
However, if considering Keto or low-carb, consider that the brain needs sugars to provide mental energy and carbs are necessary to transport glucose into the bloodstream. We also highly recommend you take a whole-food multi-nutrient supplement, such as our Fucosea – which has both macronutrients (good fats), proteins (amino acids) and micronutrients such as vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.


Seidelmann, et al.. “Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis.” The Lancet Public Health, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30135-X

Photo
Add a comment...

Manage Stress for Better Health

Have you noticed that some people seem to be able to withstand stress better than others – that they can really just “let it go?” Well, they may be healthier as time goes on, according to a study in Psychological Science (March 19, 2018) – those who ruminated and stressed about negative events the following day reported more chronic health problems 10 years later.

A nationwide survey of more than 1,100 American adults recorded the number and type of stressful events experienced each day for eight days; the events varied widely from work issues to disagreements and fights with loved ones, friends, co-workers, missed appointments, etc. The participants rated their reactions to each experience during the time they occurred and after. The team followed up with the cohort 10 years after to investigate incidence of 26 chronic diseases. They found that those individuals who held onto stress had more health problems than those who tended to let it go and move on.

So, what exactly is “stress?” Interestingly, according to experts at the American Institute of Stress (AIS), there really is no clear definition as it can be quite subjective and ambiguous. However, physical, mental or emotional strain or tension is the most common feelings identified. Another common identifying statement about stress is the feeling one has when demands exceed personal or social resources that he or she can provide.

In some cases though, some stress is caused by good events, a graduation, getting that new job, closing on a house, a retirement. This is known as “eustress.” Most people do not consider this other side of the stress coin, but it also does impact well-being, even if only temporarily (more rapid heartbeat and breathing, for example).

The biopsychosocial definition, according to AIS, distinguishes between an external element (environmental triggers outside the body), another that is internal (within the body), and a third that represents the interaction between these two factors. Some of the physical reactions experienced during stress include hypertension (high blood pressure), headaches, gastrointestinal and skin complaints, etc.

Last year, the American Psychological Association released statistics about what Americans considered the most common sources of stress (also known as “stressors”). The top five in order are number-one, “future of our nation” (63%), while “money” was 62%, followed by “work” at 61%, 57% pointed to the “political climate” and number-five was “violence/crime” at 51%.

Stress is a part of life – it’s how you handle it that makes all the difference in your physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being.

At Herbsea, we recommend two things you can do that will help tremendously – and have no negative side effects!

The renowned 4-7-8 breathing technique, developed by holistic health expert Andrew Weil, MD, is easy to do and will absolutely help you release tension. Follow these easy steps by first resting the tip of your tongue behind your top front teeth on the root of your mouth – don’t move it throughout the cycles.

1. Part your lips and exhale completely – making a “whoosh” noise.
2. Close lips and inhale nasally as you mentally count to four (the “one one-thousand, two one-thousand” method works best).
3. Hold your breath for seven “one one-thousands” or seven seconds.
4. Exhale fully from mouth for eight seconds
5. You have finished one cycle – start with three or four and work up to eight.

Take our Oysrelax supplement. It is especially formulated with botanicals shown in years of scientific studies to impart relaxation and restore balance of an overworked autonomic nervous system while relieving the sympathetic nervous system (or “sympathicus.”) While sleeping, Oysrelax helps calms your heart rate and reduces adrenaline levels. You will sleep better, allowing your body to have sufficient time to rest, restore and heal.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Manage Stress for Better Health

Have you noticed that some people seem to be able to withstand stress better than others – that they can really just “let it go?” Well, they may be healthier as time goes on, according to a study in Psychological Science (March 19, 2018) – those who ruminated and stressed about negative events the following day reported more chronic health problems 10 years later.

A nationwide survey of more than 1,100 American adults recorded the number and type of stressful events experienced each day for eight days; the events varied widely from work issues to disagreements and fights with loved ones, friends, co-workers, missed appointments, etc. The participants rated their reactions to each experience during the time they occurred and after. The team followed up with the cohort 10 years after to investigate incidence of 26 chronic diseases. They found that those individuals who held onto stress had more health problems than those who tended to let it go and move on.

So, what exactly is “stress?” Interestingly, according to experts at the American Institute of Stress (AIS), there really is no clear definition as it can be quite subjective and ambiguous. However, physical, mental or emotional strain or tension is the most common feelings identified. Another common identifying statement about stress is the feeling one has when demands exceed personal or social resources that he or she can provide.

In some cases though, some stress is caused by good events, a graduation, getting that new job, closing on a house, a retirement. This is known as “eustress.” Most people do not consider this other side of the stress coin, but it also does impact well-being, even if only temporarily (more rapid heartbeat and breathing, for example).

The biopsychosocial definition, according to AIS, distinguishes between an external element (environmental triggers outside the body), another that is internal (within the body), and a third that represents the interaction between these two factors. Some of the physical reactions experienced during stress include hypertension (high blood pressure), headaches, gastrointestinal and skin complaints, etc.

Last year, the American Psychological Association released statistics about what Americans considered the most common sources of stress (also known as “stressors”). The top five in order are number-one, “future of our nation” (63%), while “money” was 62%, followed by “work” at 61%, 57% pointed to the “political climate” and number-five was “violence/crime” at 51%.

Stress is a part of life – it’s how you handle it that makes all the difference in your physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being.

At Herbsea, we recommend two things you can do that will help tremendously – and have no negative side effects!

The renowned 4-7-8 breathing technique, developed by holistic health expert Andrew Weil, MD, is easy to do and will absolutely help you release tension. Follow these easy steps by first resting the tip of your tongue behind your top front teeth on the root of your mouth – don’t move it throughout the cycles.

1. Part your lips and exhale completely – making a “whoosh” noise.
2. Close lips and inhale nasally as you mentally count to four (the “one one-thousand, two one-thousand” method works best).
3. Hold your breath for seven “one one-thousands” or seven seconds.
4. Exhale fully from mouth for eight seconds
5. You have finished one cycle – start with three or four and work up to eight.

Take our Oysrelax supplement. It is especially formulated with botanicals shown in years of scientific studies to impart relaxation and restore balance of an overworked autonomic nervous system while relieving the sympathetic nervous system (or “sympathicus.”) While sleeping, Oysrelax helps calms your heart rate and reduces adrenaline levels. You will sleep better, allowing your body to have sufficient time to rest, restore and heal.

Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Fresh in Season: Lycopene (Tomatoes)

Summertime is known for corn and tomatoes – both are widely available freshly picked and ready to eat. Tomatoes, especially tomato products such as sauce, are very high in the carotenoid lycopene. A meta-analysis by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), presented at its 25th Research Conference (2016) looked at lycopene supplementation in prostate cancer incidence, the most common form of cancer in men (after skin cancer). Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in American men with more than 27,000 deaths each year.

In the study, Rowles et al conducted a systematic review of 66 population-based studies spanning more than 20 years to identify relationships between lycopene (and tomato) consumption and incidence of prostate cancer. The researchers found that men who ingested higher amounts of lycopene through tomatoes and tomato foods had an 11 percent reduced risk of developing prostate cancer than men who consumed the least amount of lycopene. Specifically, they found a 1 percent decrease in prostate cancer risk for each additional 1 milligram of lycopene consumed per day. (An average tomato contains approximately 3 milligrams of lycopene.)

Looking at studies focusing on tomato-only consumption, the research team found that those men who ate the highest number of tomatoes had a significant 10 percent lower risk of prostate cancer than men who ate the lowest number of tomatoes.

Study author John W. Erdman Jr., noted that this is the first study of its type of lycopene. “The huge value of this work is that it considered the entire body of past research and when combined, included several thousand men.” He added that approximately 85 percent of lycopene in the typical American diet comes solely from tomatoes (and by extension, tomato-containing products).

Lycopene expert Dr. Edward Giovannucci, from Harvard School of Public Health, the lycopene molecule’s shape enables its potent free radical quenching ability. Dr. Giovannucci’s research and other lycopene research has also shown that regular consumption of lycopene-containing foods can help lower the risk of prostate and other cancers. A study published in Neurology linked blood lycopene levels to protection against stroke. The researchers followed more than 1,000 middle-aged men for 12 years and found that those with the greatest amounts of lycopene in their blood had a 55 percent lower chance of having any type of stroke; and 59 percent lower when protecting against ischemic (blood clot-induced) stroke.

When investigating the reason for these findings the researchers theorized that beyond neutralizing free radicals, lycopene may also reduce inflammatory response, regulate cholesterol and prevent unhealthy clotting of blood. These mechanisms collectively help reduce risk of ischemic stroke.

While we at Cactus Botanics love to agree with Hippocrates’ primordial health wisdom – “let food be your medicine,” we all know that conventional Western populations tend not follow his edict, therefore, formulating with lycopene in an array of supplements and fortified foods/beverages is a great way to get health-minded but very busy adults to enjoy the benefits of this multi-tasking antioxidant. Cactus Botanics also offers lycopene, so please contact us for more information and for a sample, at info@cactusbotanics.com.


Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Consider Subscription Services for your Supplements

Consumers are now looking into receiving goods via subscriptions; and this is a new retail industry – complete with a newly established (2017) trade association – the Subscription Trade Association (“SUBTA”). You are likely familiar with these – Dollar Shave Club, Birchbox, Blue Apron, JustFab, and StitchFix – are all prime examples.

In February 2018, global management consulting and market research firm McKinsey and Co.’s a market research report, “Thinking Inside the Subscription Box: New Research on E-commerce Consumers” (by industry experts Tony Chen, Ken Fenyo, Sylvia Yang and Jessica Zhang) was released with exciting data (culled from a survey of 5,000 consumers):

The subscription e-commerce market is so dynamic it has experienced 100% year over year growth for the past five years – with the largest companies realizing more than $2.6 billion, compared to $57 million in 2011.

Approximately 15% of online consumers subscribed to one or more product services, per monthly box.

The typical e-commerce subscription customer is between 25 and 44 with annual earnings between $50,000 and $100,000; the majority live in the Northeast US.

These are exciting for customers – they offer popular products in the most convenient way to shop – from one’s home at any time of day or night. The growth and excitement of this new retail wave has spurred many startups covering many product categories – beer/wine, meal kits, pet products, video games – and supplements.

When big business notices and jumps into the fray with investments, the category is likely here to stay and will only grow. For example, according to the report, Procter and Gamble launched its own subscription service, “Gillette on Demand,” as did beauty behemoth Sephora with “Play!” and not to be outdone, Walmart with “Beauty Box.” Others were absorbed through M&A – meal kit company Plated was bought for more than $200 million by Albertsons, and Dollar Shave Club is now a part of Unilever, which bought the subscription service for a breathtaking $1 billion.

According to both SUBTA and McKinsey and Co., the subscription market has three major types of services – replenishment (automated commodity items such as razors), curation (personalized selections for surprise like Birchbox), and access (obtain lower prices or members-only perks). Curation subscriptions are the leader among the three, according to McKinsey and Co. research, with 55 percent of total subscriptions, while 32 percent of subscriptions are replenishment; access subscriptions accounted for only 13 percent. Replenishment services have high long-term subscription rates -- 45 percent of members have subscribed for at least one year.



The most attractive factors that initiate a replenishment subscription (in order according to the McKinsey survey) are financial, recommendation, desire to try something new and need. For curation subscription, the order is desire to try something new, followed by recommendation, and financial.

Consumers, however, can and do cancel at any time. The goal is not only to prevent cancellations but to ensure they remain long term. McKinsey and Co.’s survey yielded the top reasons why subscribers cancel – when products pile up, inability to customize order volumes to meet their requirements, poor quality of products and selections in curation that are not a match.

The authors of the report write, “Companies in the space must develop great experiences (as opposed to great subscriptions) to avoid high churn rates and to accelerate both growth and profitability.”

At Cactus Botanics, we not only supply the superior quality of ingredients you need for your formulas, but assist in formulation to meet your customers’ satisfaction and preferences. When considering working with a subscription service – or creating your own – we are here to help make it a win-win-win situation.
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded