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Henrikke Baumann
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Henrikke Baumann

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Melting cover up...
 
Sad reality of climate change
Rhone Glacier in the Alps is blanketed to reflect sunlight, reduce melting and further shrinkage.
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Henrikke Baumann

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By my friend that I met on the Svalbard cleaning cruise.
Love, love, love - such a beautiful article.
By Carol Devine, the one and only.
I went to Svalbard, Norway to help clean up trash at 80ªN where few humans go but where garbage accumulates. We discovered both astonishing beauty and footprints good and bad. On our ship I took along images of art and objects made from garbage.
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Henrikke Baumann

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on my radar at the moment
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Henrikke Baumann

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Travel report.
I have just spent a week as a guest lecturer at a business school, Italy, teaching about Populated life cycle approaches, i.e. life cycle methods that include actors, organization, and social issues. Teaching was productiv...
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Henrikke Baumann

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The life cycle concept has made it into the arts.
LCA = life cycle art
Here a photographic project about the life cycles of paper:
http://www.danielbushaway.com.au/lifecycle
Recent Posts. Lifecycle Post · Forestdale Post · Summit Post · Still Places Post · Control Post. Recent Comments. Archives. September 2014 · July 2014 · May 2014 · November 2013 · January 2013 · April 2012 · August 2011 · September 2010 · September 2009. Categories. Uncategorized. Meta ...
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Henrikke Baumann

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safe, but not safe...
 
This video shows the human side of what happens when governments cyberattack a citizen.
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Intressant, får ju en att tänka...
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Henrikke Baumann

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I just want this to STOP.
 
China: Why the market for commercially bred tiger parts may only get bigger

Right now in China, thousands of tigers, more than are alive in the wild, are sitting in cages, waiting for the day that their bones are turned into wine and their skin is turned into rugs. In fact, for over two decades, the tiger “farming” industry in China has been quietly ballooning, and it’s about to get a lot more legitimate.

On Friday, The Washington Post reported that a draft amendment to China’s wildlife protection law would make it legal to breed captive endangered animals. Previously, such farms were unregulated and operated largely outside the law. The new policy will allow the government to track them—but will also legalize and legitimize their activities.

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* Read EIA's response to the draft law at http://ht.ly/XMSMD
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The law, which was publicized on January 1 and is currently under review, would apply to captive tigers who are kept as performers, as well as tigers bred to be harvested for their valuable body parts.

Besides threatening a major blow to conservation efforts, the proposed policy is a reminder that a massive market for the disembodied parts of rare wildlife continues to thrive—a market that has only grown in recent years.

... With the country’s population of captive tigers jumping from about 20 in 1986 to some 5,000 today, the tiger part trade has been called “industrial-scale” in the past. As of 2013, there were already about 200 documented tiger farms in China, according to a report by the nonprofit Environmental Investigation Agency.

While tiger eyeballs, genitals, teeth and whiskers are sometimes used for their purported medicinal properties—as a treatment for problems ranging from alcoholism to epilepsy—tiger bone is where the real money's at. The pricey bones are steeped in rice wine to create a purported aphrodisiac that has been said to help ease ailments like arthritis, and is served as a status symbol at dinner parties and events.

Full story at http://motherboard.vice.com/en_ca/read/why-the-chinese-market-for-commercially-bred-tiger-parts-may-only-get-bigger

#China #tigers #tigerfarming

Image: Captive tigers at a facility in China (c) EIA
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For the rich people in China if you have one of those on your back it's a statement saying your a rich person like there buying up all the rang rover cars and anything else to look good to there other rich friends.
But very soon China will be going to slow down and crash so the world will all have a stock market crash.
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Henrikke Baumann

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In the last couple of days BBC, Forbes, Independent, Mashable, Telegraph, Time and Quartz among other media outlets have have written about Finland’s experiment with basic income on a national level. However, none of the articles uncover the reason why Finland can pull off such ambitious policies in an age where so many government are left powerless with even smallest of changes in the way society works. The bigger change is buried under the stre...
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It gives hope.
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Henrikke Baumann

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Trash bird's nest – Delftsevaart, Rotterdam
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Henrikke Baumann

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what are we heading into?…
… decline of democracy around the world… 
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Forty-five years ago, three leading ecologists asked a question of child-like simplicity, “Why is the world green?”

http://alert-conservation.org/issues-research-highlights/2015/10/31/why-we-simply-must-have-predators
ALERT member John Terborgh is a scientist of enormous stature, whose many accomplishments include a rare MacArthur 'Genius' Award. Here he tells us why predators are so crucial for the Earth -- a lesson with big implications for understanding nature and our future: Amur Leopard -- just 70 left in the wild today. Forty-five years ago, three leading ecologists asked a question of child-like simplicity, “Why is the world green?” We...
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In her circles
489 people
Have her in circles
370 people
Theresa Neal's profile photo
Maria Zetterqvist's profile photo
Magd Naser's profile photo
Annelie Janred's profile photo
Jon Larborn's profile photo
Aanand Davé's profile photo
Wouter Spekkink's profile photo
Gulnara Shavalieva's profile photo
This Is Productivity's profile photo
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