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Cover photo
Hanxue Lee
Attended Sekolah Tengku Ampuan Rahimah
Lives in Kota Kemuning
954 followers|314,342 views
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Work
Occupation
IT Consultant
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Kota Kemuning
Previously
Melbourne - Hangzhou - Singapore - Klang - Ulan Bator
Contact Information
Work
Phone
+1 408 634 8161
Email
Story
Tagline
Entrepreneur, developer, passionate about effective software engineering, enterprise architecture and animal welfare. Follow me & know more about me =)
Introduction
IT Startup Founder. That's the guy with boundless energy, loves using IT to empower people, nature, animals, martial arts, classical music.

Need to meet up? Check my schedule at https://www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=leehanxue%40gmail.com
Bragging rights
2 IT Startups concurrently
Education
  • Sekolah Tengku Ampuan Rahimah
    High School, 1995 - 1999
  • Monash University
    Bachelor of Computing, 2003 - 2003
  • APIIT College
    Advanced Diploma in Software Engineering, 2000 - 2002
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking
Birthday
September 23
Other names
Liu Hanxue, Google Lee, 柳涵学
Links
YouTube
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Hanxue Lee

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libtool: unrecognized option `-static' error on OSX: unlink Homebrew's libtool and use XCode's libtool to solve the error #nodejs   #homebrew  
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Very beautiful song by Fish Leong
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Ever wonder why C/C++ implementation code is in the header files?
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Finally took the time to find out why deleting files does not free up disk space on Linux - and how to solve it. 
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What kind of world has work but no jobs? A greedy world, that is. 
 
from /r/basicincome

There is work to be done, but no jobs.  What does that tell us?

I'm not sure this follows, but it's at least thought provoking.
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Hanxue Lee

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TypeError with json.loads in #Python 3? Simply convert the byte array to a string
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Step-by-step on installing CUDA SDK manually on an #AWS  g2.x2large #EC2  instance on  #Ubuntu  13.04
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Solving the undefined reference to symbol dlclose@@GLIBC error #gcc   #linker   #linux   #ubuntu  
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Why scary stories appeal to us
Why tell ghost stories? Why read them or listen to them? Why take such pleasure in tales that have no purpose but, comfortably, to scare?

I don’t know. Not really. It goes way back. We have ghost stories from ancient Egypt, after all, ghost stories in the Bible, classical ghost stories from Rome (along with werewolves, cases of demonic possession and, of course, over and over, witches). We have been telling each other tales of otherness, of life beyond the grave, for a long time; stories that prickle the flesh and make the shadows deeper and, most important, remind us that we live, and that there is something special, something unique and remarkable about the state of being alive.

Fear is a wonderful thing, in small doses. You ride the ghost train into the darkness, knowing that eventually the doors will open and you will step out into the daylight once again. It’s always reassuring to know that you’re still here, still safe. That nothing strange has happened, not really. It’s good to be a child again, for a little while, and to fear – not governments, not regulations, not infidelities or accountants or distant wars, but ghosts and such things that don’t exist, and even if they do, can do nothing to hurt us.

And this time of year is best for a haunting, as even the most prosaic things cast the most disquieting shadows.

The things that haunt us can be tiny things: a Web page; a voicemail message; an article in a newspaper, perhaps, by an English writer, remembering Halloweens long gone and skeletal trees and winding lanes and darkness. An article containing fragments of ghost stories, and which, nonsensical although the idea has to be, nobody ever remembers reading but you, and which simply isn’t there the next time you go and look for it. --Neil Gaiman
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