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Gyro Psychology Services
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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip

Knowing when to intervene and when to allow your child to solve problems on their own is a challenge for many parents. When and how do I support them?

“The challenge is to trust that our children are both capable and motivated. We can be so beautifully surprised at how our kids step in, step forward, and really claim responsibility in their own lives”, said Ms. Julie Lythcott-Haines, a former dean of freshman at Stanford University. 

The self-confidence that blooms in your child from navigating their way through challenging assignments, projects, and circumstances is a wonderful thing to experience and celebrate. Enjoy!

With Warmest Regards,

Dave Callies, Psy.D.
Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychologist 
Gyro Psychology Services, Inc.
360-236-0206 (o)
360-236-9909 (f)
866-616-GYRO (4976)
#GyroPsychology

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/22/fourth-grade-book-report-let-your-fourth-grader-do-it/

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip
I worked with a girl today who has some anxiety, especially around bedtime. She would often ask to sleep with her parents. Lately she has been able to fall asleep soundly with one of her small dogs. The impact of the dogs presence is magical.
There is something special about our pets. They just seem to know what we need; a cuddle or just a moment of companionship. There are specialty trained service dogs for our soldiers to relieve PTSD, help children and adults with various disabilities, provide comfort to the elderly and those with a variety of medical conditions.
I once met a service dog who is able to respond to over 200 commands, stayed up all night to watch over a soldier who had aggressive outbursts while sleeping and would occasionally sleepwalk, get his car keys and drive his car who knows where. This amazing dog was trained to lead the veteran away from the door and back to a safe place in his home. There was a special bond formed between this dog and her owner that went beyond gratitude and trust. Perhaps it was love.
This thoughtful article talks about how a service dog helped decrease anxiety in a child who was undergoing tests to understand why he was having seizures.
I welcome your stories about how your pets have enriched you life and the lives of your children.
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D
Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-4976 (gyro)

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip
Parents preconceptions about how they want their child to be can create blind spots. A parent may want their child to be an engineer while their natural talents and interests are focused on the arts and self-expression.
This can led to some confusion and tension as your children develop and begin to form their own identities in early adolescents. Gender roles can certainly be a source of conflict if parents maintain rigid and inflexible expectations for their children. Being aware of your personal reactions to your child’s behaviors and attitudes, thinking through what’s in their best interest and examining your own beliefs, values and expectations is a sound course. The movie “Billy Elliot” comes to mind.
This issue is not without an element of controversy. I think about my own children and think about how I would respond should my son or daughter lean toward a different gender role. I would feel worried and even afraid about how others would respond, how my child will adjust, and how I would adjust to this circumstance.
I hope that I would pause, communicate with them, acknowledge their feelings and thoughts, and work towards understanding and acceptance.
Here is a thoughtful article about how a parent responds to her son who has exhibited feminine traits from an early age and wants to dress up as a princess for Halloween. Curious to hear your thoughts on this one.
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D
Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-4976 (gyro)

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip
Praise is a powerful motivator for all of us.  The first step is praising others is to notice someone doing something well and to comment on the effort they took as it relates to the behavior as opposed to the final outcome. 
For example, congratulating your child on achieving a perfect score on their math test is very different than saying how proud you are of their dedication to doing their very best on the exam.
This nicely written article addresses how how praise can be used as a motivator. Pearls of wisdom are scattered throughout this one. This skill can be applied effectively in your role as a parent as well as in personal and professional relationships. Enjoy!
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D
Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-4976 (gyro)

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip
It takes a special person to be a foster parent. For one you may not have a lot of information about their parents, the pregnancy, family history or about the events and circumstances that that led up to the child being placed in foster care.
There are some qualities that naturally lead to an attachment bond forming like an even temperament and good social and cognitive skills. Even then, forming an attachment can be challenging for some parents. The attachments formed between siblings typically occur much more quickly.
Here is a thoughtful article about how a mother and her son adjust to a foster child entering their family. Touching!
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D
Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-4976 (gyro)

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip
It takes a special person to be a foster parent. For one you may not have a lot of information about their parents, the pregnancy, family history or about the events and circumstances that that led up to the child being placed in foster care.
There are some qualities that naturally lead to an attachment bond forming like an even temperament and good social and cognitive skills. Even then, forming an attachment can be challenging for some parents. The attachments formed between siblings typically occur much more quickly.
Here is a thoughtful article about how a mother and her son adjust to a foster child entering their family. Touching!
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D
Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-4976 (gyro)

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip
So many of the kids and teens I work with have wonderful dreams of becoming authors, fashion designers, film directors and writers, video game developers, and cosmetic chemists.
I worked with one teen who was so passionate about fashion design that she entered her sketches to the cast of “Project Runway”, won, and received a full academic scholarship at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles.
Gabrielle Flank, the author of this inspiring article about young entrepreneurs, writes, “success cannot be judged based on age but rather by your actions and accomplishments. Whether you’re 50 or 15 years old never be afraid to pursue your passions and never let a number (your age) get in the way of your success.”
I couldn’t agree more, Gabrielle!
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D.
Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-GYRO (4976)

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip
The third week of school is coming to an end and the backpacks are beginning to fill up with some reading, writing, and math assignments. Sight words for my first grader, a daily writing log, and our scheduled reading time.
The load for my daughter, who is a 3rd grader, is even more robust to include science projects, practice writing personal narratives, active reading, math, time telling activities, and research related volcanos and the Nisqually watershed. Both kids are involved in the running club (daily) and music lessons (weekly with daily practice).  We passed on the French and chess clubs this year. Oh yeah...and then there’s soccer.
I guess there are a lot of activities that we as parents want them to participate in. We make sacrifices to make sure they arrive on time, have the right clothing and have done enough prep for them to be prepared. They have more downtime than some kids and less than others. Their schedules relax a bit on the weekends so that they can spend time with friends and spend some down time with me.
We think this would be fun activities for them but there are some that they really don’t enjoy like practicing the violin. For those activities, we have contingencies in place (off to the bookstore with Daddy on Saturdays to pick out a book and have a treat).
I know that dance, art, acting, music, sports, tutoring and academic enrichment activities, like IXL and I Level, are all enriching and help kids to explore and expand upon talents and shore up academic skills.
Is there a limit to the number of activities our kids are involved in? Do we sign them up for enrichment activities because WE feel it would be good for them or have they actually expressed interest in learning more about one thing or another?
Here’s a timely article that talks about the stress for parents and children when schedules are just too full. Enjoy!
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D.
Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-GYRO (4976)

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Gyro's Weekly Wellness Article
When thinking about emotional intelligence, the ability to express and control our emotions is essential, but so is our ability to understand, interpret, and respond to the emotions of others. What it boils down to is our ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions.
People with strong emotional intelligence find it easy to  establish and maintain meaningful relationships, make good choices most of the time, and manage challenging personal and interpersonal situations and circumstances.
Please give us a call if your child or teen has difficulty managing their reactions to social and other situations, has difficulty forming and maintaining meaningful relationships, and problem solving, 360-236-0206.  We’re here to help!
With Warmest Regards,
Dave Callies, Psy.D.
Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
360-236-0206
866-616-GYRO (4976)

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Gyro’s Daily Wellness Tip

My father described his upbringing as challenging and meager as his formative years occurred during the great depression. He hunted for food, fished, and worked on a farm to support his family. Attending and graduating from college with a degree was something he never envisioned as even a remote option.

When my grandfather signed my father up to serve (17yo) in WWI he was given a series of exams to determine how he could best serve. He tested higher than he thought and was assigned to pilot training in the Navy. He served in Pacific campaign.

When the war ended, he received the GI bill which allowed him to attend college. He never thought that attending college was an option as he was raised in Hackensack, Minnesota by parents who never attended high school needing to work and provide financially for their family.

He was later called up to serve in the Korean war where he served as a code breaker stationed in the Philippines. After the Korean war ended, he attended law school in Iowa.

Soon after his graduation, he had to make a decision; practice in Duluth or move to a larger city with more opportunities. He traveled through the Pacific Northwest while in the Navy and thought that the mountains and the sound were spectacular. He decided to move to Seattle where he took and passed the Washington State bar exam and practiced law for over 30 years. 

My father always said that education provides an opportunity to increase possibilities and move beyond one’s current status. The other avenue to increase one’s status was marriage, he said.

Throughout his law career, he made some smart investments and put money aside for each of his children to attend higher education (college). He believed that we would have more opportunities if we graduated from college than if we didn’t. Graduating from high school and college wasn’t an option for me or my younger siblings; we would attend and graduate from college. My siblings and I all did.

I still think that higher education provides more opportunities than someone who does not choose this option. I am also sensitive to individual circumstances, believes and values and realize that going in this direction is not for everyone. 

Here’s a thoughtful article about the benefits of attending a private college. The honest reflections of three students who chose this route are the highlight of this piece.  Enjoy!

With Warmest Regards,

Dave Callies, Psy.D.
Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychologist
Gyro Psychology Services
www.GyroPsychology.com
360-236-0206
866-616-4976 (gyro)
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