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Gregory Esau
Works at SmartSwarms Management and Consulting
Attended The School of Life
Lived in Vancouver
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Gregory Esau

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To Drive?
Or Not To Drive

This is a question that is getting here fast. 

"Today, when you sit in a car, it doesn't feel like freedom. You feel frustrated. What you'd rather do, you can't do, because you're stuck in a traffic jam," said Erik Coelingh, a Volvo senior technical leader in Sweden. "I don't know if it's old-fashioned, but we still think it's a lot of fun to drive a car. For many customers that . . . is really important. We don't want to take that away."
For a glimpse of one of the auto world's thorniest modern dilemma, look no further than two contradictory TV ads for Infiniti's new Q50. - New Zealand Herald
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It is grand fun to drive a car, if it's the right car, the right time, and the right place. It's usually not, though.

Give me a dial-up self-driving shuttle vehicle of the right type for me to get to work or to public transportation or to the supermarket, to get the kids to soccer, wherever, cheaply and stress-free. I can spend the saved money to rent a choice of pleasure vehicles when I want it.
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Gregory Esau

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The Sharing Economy
What Is. What Isn't
#sharingeconomy  

While we can applaud Uber for shaking up the private transportation industry (taxis for the most part), let's not mistake them for some kind egalitarian vision for the future. Even if it's providing for a pretty good living for its drivers now, what they really want is to get rid of the drivers with self driving cars. 

Platforms that piggy-back off of the good will of "sharing", this feel good branding, are (as I posted earlier) sheep in wolves clothing. I'd rather know I am dealing with a wolf, than pretending I am supporting a sheep. 
Uber, and other's like it, are just another way to funnel money to the top of the food chain. 
Today’s most known representatives of the sharing economy discussed in global media are online platforms built on top of venture capital backed, hierarchically structured organizations.
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+Jeff Sayre , Yup.
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Gregory Esau

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At The River
Groove Armada
#triphop   #lazysunday  

A perfect accompaniment to a lazy Sunday morning, coffee, and thoughts for the upcoming week. 
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Gregory Esau

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No Virgina
There Is No Normal Economy That Will Return

I've promised myself not to flog this dying horse any longer, but this headline was too hard to resist. 
Return to?
"Normal" economy?
What frickin economy do economists think might return? These kids need to get out of the house more often and have a look around. 
 
Don’t Be So Sure the Economy Will Return to Normal

Here is another change that might be a broader sign of a pending reset: A heavy burden of adjustment in the overall labor market is being borne by the young. Wages for the typical graduate of a four-year college have dropped more than 7 percent since 2000, and the labor force participation rate of the young has been falling. One consequence is that young people are living at home longer and receiving more aid from their parents. They also seem to be less interested in buying their own homes.
As postrecession problems linger, the question arises about whether we are witnessing a fundamental shift.
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Gregory Esau

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Tooth Fairy
Economics

Because only those who believe in the tooth fairy would believe that solving a credit bubble crash with even more credit bubble inducing zero interests would work.
This time around actually scares me a bit. 
 
The accumulation of the past four months economic data is indistinguishable from results of the past two recessions*

#ns
If March was supposed to herald at least the beginning of the anticipated yearly rebound, April put that idea to rest. We have pushed way past last year’s “aberration” in the polar vortices and way past even the immediate aftermath of the 2012 slowdown (which hit in the also-snowy winter of 2013). You can make the argument that the full US economy is not in recession but it is now exceedingly difficult to sustain any position that doesn’t put the...
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Gregory Esau

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An Excellent Perspective
Macro-View
#venturecapital   #economics  

This is much more than just a look at venture capital, it's a look at who made the most of, and who has squandered, opportunity. 
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He is that.
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Gregory Esau

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Very Cool!
#3dprinting  


This just keeps getting better and better...
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Gregory Esau

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The Future is Vertical
Urban Farming

Via +CJ Dulberger 

This is a step in the right direction. 
 “The vertical farm is a theoretical construct whose time has arrived, for to fail to produce them in quantity for the world at-large in the near future will surely exacerbate the race for the limited amount of remaining natural resources of an already stressed-out planet, creating an intolerable social climate.”
Why agriculture may someday take place in towers, not fields
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Gregory Esau

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Wise Words
Because

Wolves in sheep's clothing, and all that. 
Via +John Lewis 
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Oh! So true!
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Open Source
Beats Command and Control
#problemsolving  

+Greg Satell​ has been one of my favourite quantifiers of the digitally enabled, open source style of organization for four years now. 
Here, he uses the examples of the Google approach to solving problems, that clearly differentiate the open style style, and the more strict command and control style. 
What is the key here is the culture, and ethos. It's accepted in places like Google that anyone can attack the problem, and solve it if they can. 
Nice job by Greg here to illustrate the differences, and results. 
It’s intertwined with company culture.
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Gregory Esau

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Marc Andreesen
Solitary Man

Fascinating look into the man and mind of Marc Andreesen, and the imperfect world of venture capital. 
Via +Suzanne Catty 

Yet math was no help with mass psychology. “Even if we could do perfect analysis, we just can’t know the future,” he said. “What if Google Ventures had access to all Google searches—could you predict hit products? Or perfect access to all of people’s conversations or purchases? You still wouldn’t know what’s going to happen. How is psychohistory going?” he went on, referring to Isaac Asimov’s invention, in his “Foundation” novels, of a statistical field that could predict the behavior of civilizations. “Not very fucking good at all! Which, by the way, is part of what makes this job really fun. It’s a people business. If we could revise the industry completely, we’d just dump all the business plans and focus on people—the twenty-three-year-old Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs.

He acknowledged, though, that his optimism dims once human beings—with their illogic, hidden agendas, and sheer bugginess—enter the equation. “We’re imperfect people pursuing perfect ideas, and there’s tremendous frustration in the gap,” he said. “Writing code, one or two people, that’s the Platonic ideal. But when you want to impact the world you need one hundred people, then one thousand, then ten thousand—and people have all these people issues.” He examined the problem in silence. “A world of just computers wouldn’t work,” he concluded wistfully. “But a world of just people could certainly be improved.”
At his firm, Andreessen Horowitz, the venture capitalist routinely lays out “what will happen in the next ten, twenty, thirty years.” Credit Photograph by Joe Pugliese
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I agree, +Tanveer Naseer . 
Big data can allow us to see things we might not have otherwise, but it still takes people, and real thinking, asking the right questions, understanding what outcomes to be achieved, and so on. 
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Gregory Esau

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Unicorns
And Horses
#venturecapital  

A pretty interesting graphic, for those who have a certain 'thing' for this sort of score keeping. 
Key term is "valued", rather than "worth". 
The horses here will very likely still be around, and survive, when the shit hits the fan. The unicorns? Not so much. 
 
There was a time when it was rare for a startup to reach the exclusive “Unicorn” club, the term given to startups worth more than $1 billion.

But times have changed, and unicorns have become a lot more common lately. According to research firm CB Insights, there are a total of 99 startups valued at more than $1 billion, with nearly 40 of them joining the unicorn club in 2014 alone. In 2015, CB Insights predicts there will be 50 new unicorn startups.

But it's also worth noting that the combined value of all the unicorns is still less than the market cap of Facebook (as of April 2015). As seen in the chart below by BI Intelligence, based on CB Insights’ data, Facebook out-values the unicorns by almost $20 billion.

This means at least one or two of these unicorns will likely blow up eventually and get to Facebook or Google's status. But this is also a sign that it's extremely difficult to make a killing in venture capital. Some of these unicorn startups will likely wind up failing to reach these lofty expectations, and "vaporize" when the market turns, as famed VC investor Marc Andreessen once warned.
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Education
  • The School of Life
    Experience/ Trial and Error, 1959 - 2011
  • mission senior secondary
    1975 - 1977
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Smart Swarming The Future of Organization
Introduction

SmartSwarm Management and Consulting

Better Perspectives
Better Decisions
Problem Solving
Engagement
Leadership
Ecosystems

I use Google Plus as social media, to stay informed, to connect with collective intelligence, and keeping my perspective broad. 
I post to inform, broaden perspective, occasionally amuse, and to offer glimpses into my life and city. 
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I build things.
Work
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Consulting. SmartSwarm Management and Consulting
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Are you kidding? I'm a generalist and continual learner.
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  • SmartSwarms Management and Consulting
    Founder, present
    I use the collective intelligence in business environments and networks to "Swarm" problems, create opportunities, to advance businesses and organizations towards continual adaptation.
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Vancouver - Victoria - Mission, B.C.
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