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Gregory Esau
Works at SmartSwarms Management and Consulting
Attended The School of Life
Lived in Vancouver
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Gregory Esau

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"F**King Paleo"
Or Why Cave men People Never Wrote Poetry
#paleodiet   #humour   #fundamentalism  

This is funny. I mean super fucking funny. And as we know, things are always that little bit funnier when they have a F-bomb or two. 
But! This can be even better, even funnier, if we read it as a metaphor for fundamentalism. You know, when you take something that just may have a lick of sense to it, and puratan the living hell out of it to extreme, ill-logical manifestation of righteousness. 
Via +Sakari Maaranen who plussed +Vic Gundotra  who shared +Mark Traphagen who posted...
Recently, I went pseudo Paleo. I say pseudo, because, like most things in my life, I've jumped in headfirst without putting any thought or research into it (this is also how I ended up taking a workout class called “Insanity.” Afterwards, I was drooling and delirious. So I guess it delivered).
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That's fabulous, +Marcus Kaczmarek !
Many of these diets of lifestyle will work for some people. I know people who did really well on the Atkin's diet. But none of the diets are for everybody, is my thinking. Our own chemistry (so to speak), is too varied, too complex. Horses for courses, and all that. 
If it worked for you, that is fantastic! Everyone needs to work this through for themselves, and this was one humourist's way of saying it didn't work for her. 
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Gregory Esau

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Whither Journalism
Hello 'Social', Um, "Media"
#attentioneconomy   #criticalthinking  

In a world where everyone, and their dog (or cat),  can express their opinion, journalism can not survive. The noise to signal ratio, the ever increasing freakish means to gain attention, simply swamps the nuanced, critical thinking of journalism. 
An extension of an earlier post via +Walter H Groth , with this post coming via +Tamara Schenk .

In this passage from Understanding Media, Marshall McLuhan, reminds us of the difficulty that frictionless connection brings with it and how technological media advances have worked not to preserve but rather to ‘abolish history.’
"The instantaneity of communication makes free speech and thought difficult if not impossible, and for many reasons."
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Of course this is not serious. Thin attempts at Joycean neologisms and puns are futile. 

One thing is serious. +Andrew G  remarks are seriously naive.

According to McLuhan, the enhanced "electric speed in bringing all social and political functions together in a sudden implosion has heightened human awareness of responsibility to an intense degree." Increased speed of communication and the ability of people to read about, spread, and react to global news quickly, forces us to become more involved with one another from various social groups and countries around the world and to be more aware of our global responsibilities. This new reality has implications for forming new sociological structures within the context of culture. According to McLuhan, They are involved in complex community networks stretching across cities, nations, and oceans. Yet the ease with which telecommunications connect friends of friends may also increase the density of interconnections within already existing social clusters.  

-Gutenberg Galaxy.

+Andrew G  Please, before further insultingly dumb comments, read Finnegan Wake and study G.K. Chesterton.  Thanks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton
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More Meat
On The Etherium BlockChain Technology
#etherium   #blockchain   #decentralization  

This is the best post to date on the utility of the blockchain as developed by +Ethereum for use in business. 
This is real innovation, as this enables new business models and structures, allowing these model systems to be truly decentralized. 
Even better, is whether the business is stacked or an ecosystem (or in between), this "ledger system" will greatly reduce transaction costs, while increasing trust and transparency. 
 
Ethereum's Alternative Blockchain

This is a good, accessible, and informative blog post about the latest developments with Ethereum, its alternative blockchain protocol, and focus on smart contracts and decentralised applications, and of course its relation to Bitcoin. 

The Business Imperative Behind the Ethereum Vision: https://blog.ethereum.org/2015/05/24/the-business-imperative-behind-the-ethereum-vision/ 

The genius behind Ethereum is this magical network of computers that enables a new type of software applications: the truly decentralized ones, based on embedding the logic of trust inside small programs and distributing them to run on its blockchain. It is based on a 3-tier architecture, comprising an advanced browser as the client, the blockchain ledger as a shared resource, and a virtual network of computers that run smart business logic programs in a decentralized way.

The Ethereum transaction ledger can be used to securely execute a wide variety of services including: voting systems, domain name registries, financial exchanges, crowdfunding platforms, company governance, self-enforcing contracts and agreements, intellectual property, smart property, and distributed autonomous organisations.

The piece is passionate and outlines an expansive vision for Ethereum's promise and blockchain technology in general. Worth a read to keep up to date with the space and (re)consider future possibilities out of idle interest or direct engagement. The main blog itself has a number of good and useful entries. 

#ethereum   #blockchain   #bitcoin  
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Gregory Esau

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I hope this replaces the wheelchair some day. 

Imagine the difference that would make for people now in wheelchairs!
They could go hiking, is one thing that now comes to mind. 
 
That robotic cheetah built by MIT researchers? They've now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs, making it “the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.”...
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I know, +David Crosswell . Compromise is always the reality. 
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"Org Chart"
Terms To Die By
#itwasniceknowingyou  

Haaahaaaahaaahaaa. "Org chart". Great for feeling important, entitled, and a killer parking space, but a lousy way to run a railroad. 
 
Venkat Rao:

Most senior executives — VP and above in organizations of 1500 or more people say — are in the position of surgeons operating on the basis of having played the kids’ game Operation rather than on the basis of medical training and tools like MRI machines.

There’s a very good excuse for this though: the pace of organizational and environmental change today turns static maps into garbage very quickly. The part of the organization that is both possible and useful to represent using an org chart has been rapidly shrinking.

[...]

After a century of subservience, the social graph had reasserted its authority over the impoverished org chart. Up become the direction of increasing disorientedness. Inside became the direction of increasing disconnectedness from reality.

[...]

There are two basic (but not mutually exclusive) responses you can have to this phenomenon of shrinking org-chart views of corporate realities: turn to more powerful maps or step back and reconsider what sort of situation awareness you actually need in order to be effective.

[...]

Letting go means you start figuring out management strategies and capabilities that do not require global situation awareness or tight synchronization and alignment of views, just a rough consensus on a few key beliefs. This means developing capabilities that are, in some sense, antifragile in the face of increasing VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity).

[...]

The advantage of direct approaches is that they are often more robust and often involve fewer modeling assumptions that can break. At a people level, they involving breaking and forming habits via direct conditioning. Their disadvantage is that they are non-intuitive and harder to fix when the assumptions do break down. They don’t give you much of an understanding of the system. Only the means to control it effectively. If you want understanding and appreciation, that’s a separate problem.

The advantage of indirect approaches is that they give you an appreciation of how the system works (the model) as a byproduct of trying to control it, but give up some of the capability envelope in order to do so. Sometimes a very significant amount of capability. At a people level, indirect approaches adapt via cognitive reframing and conscious, self-managed attempts at behavior change.

Each of the four quadrants represents a pure approach that works under some narrow range of circumstances. Indirect-determinate techniques like Wardley Maps apply when you there is low ambiguity about the structure of the value chain (there is a discoverable “ground truth” about the environment), and you don’t have complete control over all the moving parts in the environment.

If you do have control (or can acquire control), you can operate in direct-determinate (Q2) ways: lower VUCA by simply buying up and integrating everything you need, soup to nuts, making the competition less relevant, and using more traditional management methods (the analogy in control is adding more actuators to control previously uncontrolled behaviors, lowering the need for adaptation).

[...]

For a stream corporation, an org chart is increasingly a not-even-wrong construct for thinking about corporate anatomy. Because most of the structure is not formally created or under deterministic control.

[...]

The biggest shared bias of the anthropocentric-seven (mechanistic, organic, instrument of domination, brain, culture, political system and psychic prison) is that they tend to confuse social-psychological reality with all reality, and reductively think and manage in terms of purely social-psychological realities. This leads, for example, to the self-righteous culture-over-strategy meme common to all seven, and to the deeply misguided idea that preserving and extending the “lives” of corporations (and organizations in general) is ipso facto a good idea.

The rise of the stream corporation and the flux/change metaphor is a challenge to anthropocentrism in business. 

[...]

Often a smarter, lower-effort approach is to manage anxieties rather than realities.

[...]

In the future, I suppose layoffs will become bleed-offs. Reorgs will become reroutings of flows.

[...]

When immersed in a stream, your view of the global environment is something like an evolving gestalt of emotion and tempo, rather than a mental model you can articulate or document. You may be able to answer questions like Is the organization healthy? How should we respond to this development? and Is morale high? without being able to answer questions like What’s the overall structure of this organization?

http://www.ribbonfarm.com/2015/05/28/the-amazing-shrinking-org-chart/
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Gregory Esau

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The Future is Vertical
Urban Farming

Via +CJ Dulberger 

This is a step in the right direction. 
 “The vertical farm is a theoretical construct whose time has arrived, for to fail to produce them in quantity for the world at-large in the near future will surely exacerbate the race for the limited amount of remaining natural resources of an already stressed-out planet, creating an intolerable social climate.”
Why agriculture may someday take place in towers, not fields
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Gregory Esau

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Wise Words
Because

Wolves in sheep's clothing, and all that. 
Via +John Lewis 
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Oh! So true!
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Gregory Esau

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Oh!! Oh!! Look! A Journalist!
Haahaahaa...The "War" on Drugs

Boys and girls. Once upon a time, sometime between the last half the the 1950's and the early 1970's, there was this concept called journalism. Look it up, you may find references to it in Wikipedia. Maybe your hippy grand parents have vague recollections. Ask them. 
Anyways, this "journalism" got the cigarette industry in the trouble, and messed up the fun the military was having in Vietnam, which cost important, well connected people money and power, so it was systematically eliminated, with something called "entertainment" taking it's place. 
We could say "link bait", or "attention grabbing" pretty much synonymously, with the basic idea of using current events to gain "eyeballs" so people could sell you stuff. Journalism disappeared from the media landscape.

Every so often -- like a unicorn!! -- it will surface, and the charade will be exposed. Well, sort of. As nobody knows what journalism looks like any longer, it disappears even quicker than it appeared, buried under an avalanche of Kim Kardasian updates, ideologue opinion, and general sensationalism. 
 
Leading Mexican Journalist Explains Why Everything You're Hearing About The Drug War Is Wrong
By Roque Planas - The Huffington Post
#Mexico

As one of Mexico’s leading investigative journalists, Anabel Hernández has dedicated the past decade to investigating her country’s drug war -- one of the most dangerous projects a reporter could ask for. Her 2010 book Los señores del narco, translated into English as Narcoland, detailed the extensive government corruption that allowed Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán and his Sinaloa cartel to become one of the most powerful criminal enterprises in the world.

Working in partnership with journalist Steve Fisher at The Investigative Reporting Program (IRP) at U.C. Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism , Hernández has also been at the forefront of one of the leading investigative reports into the case of the missing 43 students from the Ayotzinapa teachers college who were attacked by Mexican police in September.

Hernández spoke with The WorldPost about the misconceptions surrounding Mexico’s drug war, the role the U.S. plays in Mexico's violence and why we shouldn’t assume that drug cartels are behind the disappearance of the missing 43 students.

http://goo.gl/I7uRqH
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I hear you, bro, I hear you...
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Gregory Esau

The Future of Work  - 
 
The Future of Business

The best post to date for the blockchain as a significant business innovation. 
Truly decentralized business models, decreased transaction costs. Increased trust and transparency. 
I hesitate to put a time frame on the transition, but the days are not far off when all organization will run on blockchain technologies.  
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Here's +Vinay Gupta giving an intersting 20 min presentation about how the world is at a tipping point regarding empowering the poor people around the world via crypto and BlockChain. Some powerful ideas..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ja7HSHqt_Y&feature=youtu.be
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Gregory Esau

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"They Blinded Me With Science!"
The Diet Swindles
#science  

It's real easy to do bad science. Especially when diets fads are involved. 
Bonus points to anyone who can name the song quote. 
 
"[The] study was 100 percent authentic. My colleagues and I recruited actual human subjects in Germany. We ran an actual clinical trial, with subjects randomly assigned to different diet regimes. And the statistically significant benefits of chocolate that we reported are based on the actual data. It was, in fact, a fairly typical study for the field of diet research. Which is to say: It was terrible science. The results are meaningless, and the health claims that the media blasted out to millions of people around the world are utterly unfounded.

Here’s how we did it."


“Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just beneath their update about the Germanwings crash. From there, it ricocheted around the internet and beyond, making news in more than 20 countries and half a dozen languages. It was discussed on tel...
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+Christof Harper 
I'm a bit disappointed no one took a stab at it. Even with your corrected version. 
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To Drive?
Or Not To Drive

This is a question that is getting here fast. 

"Today, when you sit in a car, it doesn't feel like freedom. You feel frustrated. What you'd rather do, you can't do, because you're stuck in a traffic jam," said Erik Coelingh, a Volvo senior technical leader in Sweden. "I don't know if it's old-fashioned, but we still think it's a lot of fun to drive a car. For many customers that . . . is really important. We don't want to take that away."
For a glimpse of one of the auto world's thorniest modern dilemma, look no further than two contradictory TV ads for Infiniti's new Q50. - New Zealand Herald
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It is grand fun to drive a car, if it's the right car, the right time, and the right place. It's usually not, though.

Give me a dial-up self-driving shuttle vehicle of the right type for me to get to work or to public transportation or to the supermarket, to get the kids to soccer, wherever, cheaply and stress-free. I can spend the saved money to rent a choice of pleasure vehicles when I want it.
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The Sharing Economy
What Is. What Isn't
#sharingeconomy  

While we can applaud Uber for shaking up the private transportation industry (taxis for the most part), let's not mistake them for some kind egalitarian vision for the future. Even if it's providing for a pretty good living for its drivers now, what they really want is to get rid of the drivers with self driving cars. 

Platforms that piggy-back off of the good will of "sharing", this feel good branding, are (as I posted earlier) sheep in wolves clothing. I'd rather know I am dealing with a wolf, than pretending I am supporting a sheep. 
Uber, and other's like it, are just another way to funnel money to the top of the food chain. 
Today’s most known representatives of the sharing economy discussed in global media are online platforms built on top of venture capital backed, hierarchically structured organizations.
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+Jeff Sayre , Yup.
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Education
  • The School of Life
    Experience/ Trial and Error, 1959 - 2011
  • mission senior secondary
    1975 - 1977
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Smart Swarming The Future of Organization
Introduction

SmartSwarm Management and Consulting

Better Perspectives
Better Decisions
Problem Solving
Engagement
Leadership
Ecosystems

I use Google Plus as social media, to stay informed, to connect with collective intelligence, and keeping my perspective broad. 
I post to inform, broaden perspective, occasionally amuse, and to offer glimpses into my life and city. 
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I build things.
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Consulting. SmartSwarm Management and Consulting
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Are you kidding? I'm a generalist and continual learner.
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  • SmartSwarms Management and Consulting
    Founder, present
    I use the collective intelligence in business environments and networks to "Swarm" problems, create opportunities, to advance businesses and organizations towards continual adaptation.
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