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Gregg Krech
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Gregg Krech, author, Naikan: Gratitude, Grace and the Japanese Art of Self-reflection
Gregg Krech, author, Naikan: Gratitude, Grace and the Japanese Art of Self-reflection

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Admire Those Who Are Struggling
by Gregg Krech

I took a 12 mile bike ride yesterday on the Burlington bike path, most of which stretches along the shores of Lake Champlain. On the ride I passed two obese women who were walking solemnly along the side of the path. I also passed a chubby young man who never took his eyes off his smartphone.

The night before, at my friend’s birthday party, a 40 year-old man got up to play guitar and struggled to sing in the correct key. At open mic night at the Comedy Shop, a young aspiring comedienne nervously went through her ten minute routine which, honestly, wasn’t very funny. A man from Spain sent me a long email, riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

I have great admiration for each of these people.

CONTINUE READING . . .
https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/admire-those-who-are-struggling/


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Admire Those Who Are Struggling
by Gregg Krech

I took a 12 mile bike ride yesterday on the Burlington bike path, most of which stretches along the shores of Lake Champlain. On the ride I passed two obese women who were walking solemnly along the side of the path. I also passed a chubby young man who never took his eyes off his smartphone.

The night before, at my friend’s birthday party, a 40 year-old man got up to play guitar and struggled to sing in the correct key. At open mic night at the Comedy Shop, a young aspiring comedienne nervously went through her ten minute routine which, honestly, wasn’t very funny. A man from Spain sent me a long email, riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

I have great admiration for each of these people.

CONTINUE READING . . .
https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/admire-those-who-are-struggling/


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Admire Those Who Are Struggling
by Gregg Krech

I took a 12 mile bike ride yesterday on the Burlington bike path, most of which stretches along the shores of Lake Champlain. On the ride I passed two obese women who were walking solemnly along the side of the path. I also passed a chubby young man who never took his eyes off his smartphone.

The night before, at my friend’s birthday party, a 40 year-old man got up to play guitar and struggled to sing in the correct key. At open mic night at the Comedy Shop, a young aspiring comedienne nervously went through her ten minute routine which, honestly, wasn’t very funny. A man from Spain sent me a long email, riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

I have great admiration for each of these people.

CONTINUE READING . . .
https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/admire-those-who-are-struggling/


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Admire Those Who Are Struggling
by Gregg Krech

I took a 12 mile bike ride yesterday on the Burlington bike path, most of which stretches along the shores of Lake Champlain. On the ride I passed two obese women who were walking solemnly along the side of the path. I also passed a chubby young man who never took his eyes off his smartphone.

The night before, at my friend’s birthday party, a 40 year-old man got up to play guitar and struggled to sing in the correct key. At open mic night at the Comedy Shop, a young aspiring comedienne nervously went through her ten minute routine which, honestly, wasn’t very funny. A man from Spain sent me a long email, riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

I have great admiration for each of these people.

CONTINUE READING . . .
https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/admire-those-who-are-struggling/


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Admire Those Who Are Struggling
by Gregg Krech

I took a 12 mile bike ride yesterday on the Burlington bike path, most of which stretches along the shores of Lake Champlain. On the ride I passed two obese women who were walking solemnly along the side of the path. I also passed a chubby young man who never took his eyes off his smartphone.

The night before, at my friend’s birthday party, a 40 year-old man got up to play guitar and struggled to sing in the correct key. At open mic night at the Comedy Shop, a young aspiring comedienne nervously went through her ten minute routine which, honestly, wasn’t very funny. A man from Spain sent me a long email, riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

I have great admiration for each of these people.

CONTINUE READING . . .
https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/admire-those-who-are-struggling/


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Admire Those Who Are Struggling
by Gregg Krech

I took a 12 mile bike ride yesterday on the Burlington bike path, most of which stretches along the shores of Lake Champlain. On the ride I passed two obese women who were walking solemnly along the side of the path. I also passed a chubby young man who never took his eyes off his smartphone.

The night before, at my friend’s birthday party, a 40 year-old man got up to play guitar and struggled to sing in the correct key. At open mic night at the Comedy Shop, a young aspiring comedienne nervously went through her ten minute routine which, honestly, wasn’t very funny. A man from Spain sent me a long email, riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

I have great admiration for each of these people.

CONTINUE READING . . .
https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/admire-those-who-are-struggling/


Post has attachment
Admire Those Who Are Struggling
by Gregg Krech

I took a 12 mile bike ride yesterday on the Burlington bike path, most of which stretches along the shores of Lake Champlain. On the ride I passed two obese women who were walking solemnly along the side of the path. I also passed a chubby young man who never took his eyes off his smartphone.

The night before, at my friend’s birthday party, a 40 year-old man got up to play guitar and struggled to sing in the correct key. At open mic night at the Comedy Shop, a young aspiring comedienne nervously went through her ten minute routine which, honestly, wasn’t very funny. A man from Spain sent me a long email, riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

I have great admiration for each of these people.

https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/admire-those-who-are-struggling/

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Our newest issue of Thirty Thousand Days (TTD) is out and we'd love for you to see it! Sign up and we'll send you a free full-color digital issue.

TTD has been the ToDo Institute's flagship publication for 25 years! Our natural approach to mental wellness is informed by Japanese Psychology and helps to bridge the gap between the spiritual, the psychological and the practical.

Themes covered in this issue include: coming to terms with the end of childhood, managing disappointment, how we sabotage the present moment, reflecting on a difficult father, learning from an extraordinary mother, coping with "lifeache" and much more.

Sign up here: https://tinyurl.com/y78cjrac
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Don’t Take Your Time
by Gregg Krech

There are many ways in which we “take our time”. We stroll through the woods or a park on a weekend morning. We drink a cup of tea or coffee after sharing dinner with friends and we talk endlessly just to enjoy their company. We read a good novel on a cold winter evening.

Sometimes we’re waiting for someone who’s scurrying about trying to get ready. But we don’t want them to rush, so we say, “Take your time.” It’s a strange phrase. You can’t really “take” your time. However, you can slow down, relax and not rush to get where you’re trying to go.

Yet there are times when you shouldn’t take your time. If your wife is about to give birth, you should rush, you should move fast. If you see someone drowning in the pond, you should rescue them as quickly as possible. If you walk into your basement, smell smoke, and find giant flames engulfing the furnace room, you should run out of the house as fast as you can.

The question of whether we take our time or don’t take our time is determined by the needs of the situation, not by our feelings or by what we want to do.

Continue reading . . .


https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/dont-take-your-time/

Post has attachment
Don’t Take Your Time
by Gregg Krech

There are many ways in which we “take our time”. We stroll through the woods or a park on a weekend morning. We drink a cup of tea or coffee after sharing dinner with friends and we talk endlessly just to enjoy their company. We read a good novel on a cold winter evening.

Sometimes we’re waiting for someone who’s scurrying about trying to get ready. But we don’t want them to rush, so we say, “Take your time.” It’s a strange phrase. You can’t really “take” your time. However, you can slow down, relax and not rush to get where you’re trying to go.

Yet there are times when you shouldn’t take your time. If your wife is about to give birth, you should rush, you should move fast. If you see someone drowning in the pond, you should rescue them as quickly as possible. If you walk into your basement, smell smoke, and find giant flames engulfing the furnace room, you should run out of the house as fast as you can.

The question of whether we take our time or don’t take our time is determined by the needs of the situation, not by our feelings or by what we want to do.

Continue reading . . .


https://www.thirtythousanddays.org/2017/07/dont-take-your-time/
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