Profile

Cover photo
Greg Sanders
Works at CSIS
Attended University of Maryland, College Park
Lives in Ellicott City, MD
159 followers|67,576 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Greg Sanders

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
Interesting, do tenses play a role in universal grammar or are they a higher level language feature?
1
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
This Monday is transit night in Annapolis. Purple Line Now, Red Line Now, and a range of allies are going to the state capital to let our legislators know that our support is still strong and to talk over any remaining questions they may have. If you're interested, sign up to join us, you can aim for a 5 pm arrival or later as your schedule allows:  http://ow.ly/IPhvZ There's still carpool spots: http://www.groupcarpool.com/t/y32n0u

If you'd like to support but can't make it, there will be opportunities by social media.
Who We Are · What We Want · Why Light Rail? Rails & Trails · How You Can Help. Purple Line FACT SHEET. Sierra Club ranks. Purple Line to be one of. Best in Nation. MTA's official. LPA Map and. Description: purplelinemd.com. Join our. PLN Newsletter ...
1
1
Monica Fulvio's profile photo
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
Thomson gets it right here. I'm certainly not a fan of all of these projects, but there's also times to change them. Asking Gov. Hogan to see through a project he's not the biggest fan of isn't unusual in the slightest, it's the norm. As Thomson says, momentum alone shouldn't be enough, but the Purple Line is the top transportation priority of both counties and has wide-based business support, not to mentioning being one of the country's top projects according to the Sierra Club.
Big highway and transit projects are always controversial, always over budget and always built.
1
Add a comment...
 
Great video from students at my high school on the Purple Line.
1
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
A bit more detail on where the project stands and why I'm concerned but hopeful.
1
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
Good editorial from the Washington Post. If you agree and think that connecting communities in the DC Metro areas matter, please do let the transition team know at  info@hogantransition.com 

We've got a sample letter up at http://purplelinenow.com/
Will Md.’s governor-elect exploit the politics of resentment or nurture the economy outside GOP strongholds?
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
159 people
Norman Newkirk's profile photo
Teresa Smith's profile photo
Alice Souza's profile photo
Jason Lunn's profile photo
Alexander Lobkovsky Meitiv's profile photo
Ashley Wright's profile photo
jaya saputra's profile photo
Robert Rashford's profile photo
Andrew G. Schneider's profile photo

Greg Sanders

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
In learning about how words shift meaning over time, I was fascinated to discover that weakening was common (awesome and fantastic are used as examples) but that strengthening really wasn't (although I can think of rare exceptions like decimated). The mechanism for this, hyperbole, seems straightforward. But I'd guess it also means that we do slowly lose some of our more intense terms over time. I guess we're reliant on neologisms, words from other languages, and less commonly used terms if we want to say something that has been diluted by exaggeration.
1
The Ling Space's profile photo
 
+Greg Sanders Thanks for the comment, and good to see you here again! You're right that we've lost a bunch of terms over time to weakening, and without strengthening being a thing, we have to shift other things around. And you correctly note a couple of these: think like borrowing "uber" from German, for example. Or the multitude of slangy ways you can say something is great, depending on your dialect - maybe you can say it is wicked, or sick, etc. But yeah, we do have to promote other words to be as superlative once we've worn the ones we had down. But we manage to make it work. ^_^
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
Heads up about the discount and a few ways you might want to apply it.
1
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
The 90 day delay is concerning, particularly given that the administration hasn't yet committed to building the line.
Construction of the Purple Line in Montgomery and Prince George's counties is supposed to start by the end of the year, but another delay has supporters questioning the light rail system's future in M
1
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nice seeing support from Frederick.
“My priority is building roads.” That’s what Larry Hogan had to say when Washington Post columnist Robert McCartney asked the incoming governor about his commitment to building the Purple Line. A 16-mile light-rail line, it’s sort of a transit equivalent to the Intercounty Connector, providing an east-west link from Bethesda in Montgomery County to New Carrollton in Prince George’s County as well as Silver Spring, Takoma Park, College Park and Me...
1
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

Shared publicly  - 
 
Marylanders,

The Purple Line and any other transit projects in the state are in grave danger. The source of the problem is not the budget deficit, infrastructure projects are an investment and they are paid for out of the locked transportation trust fund. Instead, the source of the risk is that the Gov. Elect doesn't buy that these are a project that Marylanders actually want.

Let him know how you feel and share facts about how it will help Maryland's economy!
1
Add a comment...

Greg Sanders

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
The international phonetic alphabet does seem really quite useful. How challenging is it for an adult to learn all the components of it? The ways the sounds are logically arranged seems like it would be helpful, but you've already discussed in the past how recognizing sounds is more easily done when young.
2
The Ling Space's profile photo
 
+Greg Sanders Thanks for the question! I think it depends on what you mean by learning it, exactly. Learning the components in terms of describing each of the sounds isn't terribly hard - we do that every term in a month or six weeks in phonetics classes. So learning to look at [c] and say "voiceless palatal stop!" is not hard.Learning to recognize or produce all the different sounds accurately is more difficult, though. This is more of a matter of training your ear or your mouth to do the relevant things. I've been doing it for years, and I still have sounds I struggle to produce correctly within the first couple of tries. The hearing side, I find, comes easier with training, but it takes longer to hear them differently in context, as opposed to in isolation.That said, it is still definitely doable, and there are a lot of resources available online that can help with this - phonetics people aren't shy about sharing! I do think it's a very useful tool, and it's accessible, particularly if you focus on the sounds that are the most common cross-linguistically that you need. It just takes some training. But it's worth it in the end, I think. ^_^
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
159 people
Norman Newkirk's profile photo
Teresa Smith's profile photo
Alice Souza's profile photo
Jason Lunn's profile photo
Alexander Lobkovsky Meitiv's profile photo
Ashley Wright's profile photo
jaya saputra's profile photo
Robert Rashford's profile photo
Andrew G. Schneider's profile photo
Education
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    Computer Science, 1998 - 2002
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    Government and Politics, 1998 - 2002
  • University of Denver
    International Studies, 2004 - 2006
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Gregory Sanders
Work
Occupation
International Relations Quantitative Researcher
Employment
  • CSIS
    Fellow, 2010 - present
  • CSIS
    Research Associate, 2006 - 2010
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Ellicott City, MD
Previously
Silver Spring, MD
Links