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Dropbox is disruptive?

Don't get me wrong - I love Dropbox but +Bill Gurley's post about it being a "major disruption" is a bit of an overstatement. If your computing universe revolves around Apple, yes it's probably disruptive because file syncing has historically been a pain. But in the last few years a number of companies have emerged that handle syncing really well with broad OS support. I would argue that SugarSync handles file syncing and file management much better than Dropbox with many more features. For the next month Box.net, with similar features to Dropbox, is giving away 50GB of data. It's a crowded space and the window for Dropbox being unique or disruptive is closing quickly.

What's disruptive now? Enterprises using shared cloud storage as file shares from multiple locations using a global name space on virtual appliances. Few companies are doing this right now but the implications and growth are so much larger than the consumer market. Where Dropbox users are buying capacity by the GB, companies are buying file sharing cloud storage by the TB. It's not as sexy and cool as an iOS app, but it really is disruptive.
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6 comments
Jean D.
 
If you want to build your own DropBox like file sharing leveraging your own Enterprise security and storage look at OxygenCloud. They offer what Enterprise are looking for file sharing so that their users can install on their own devices securely.
 
+Jean Dion It has AD integration (which is good) but I didn't see anything on their site regarding global namespace which, IMHO, is a critical enterprise feature.
Jean D.
 
They support multinode for scaling. It is a VM deployment approach so Global Namespace need to be provided via back-end storage over NFS with your favorite storage vendors.
Jean D.
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Well I do not know about that. 5 years ago tablets and today's smart phones were not available. Our kids are growing with them and most of them are not using emails at all. Even for them Music CD, DVD films and even USB key are old stuff. So I can see this kind of file sharing taking the lead within the next two years.

For corporation it is another story. I think Private cloud file services will be the norm. Most public file cloud services are based in US. That slow or stop corporations adoption outside US because of Patriot Act. In Canada and Europe corporate data security is seriously considered or look at when using these services.
 
We use OxygenCloud with Atmos for Sync & Share. Atmos provides the global namespace across VMs and physical hardware.
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