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MASSIVE ANNOUNCEMENT: (With more info HERE: http://glp.is/1erxY6B)

It's with ENORMOUS pleasure that we share our tie up with Josh Flowers & The Wild, performing in the wonderful Wilton's Music Hall. They are amazing, just watch.

It's the first of their 'Small Business Sessions', helping highlight the remarkable great little places that make London so damn special.

Watch, like, comment and SHARE THE BEJESUS OUT OF IT. They deserve it.
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B.Y.O.C.
Underneath Juice Club, 28 Bedfordbury, London WC2N 4RB
I have no shame in saying that I write this whilst still under the influence of BYOC...the morning after. It's true that in life you only get out what you put in, BYOC is no exception (that's Bring Your Own Cocktail in full). The uber-charming subterranean cocktail haunt that is nestled in the heart of Covent Garden, sets itself apart from the rest by allowing you to bring your own bottle for their specialist cocktail waiter to have fun with (plus 20 English pounds per person). Rest assured he does indeed have fun with it...

The upstairs juice bar provides a relatively low key opening into the world of BYOC. You are quickly told the rules and ushered down the stairs into the dark speakeasy. Whilst there time feels like it ceases to exist as you work your way through the mixologist's magical trolley of mixers, marmalades and other delights. The two hour slot you are given is most likely put in place for health reasons, any longer and the narrow winding stairs out would be too much for any normal human being to tackle.

There is space for every type of spirit here and that's the fun of it. Whether it's a bottle of Archers or a highly recommended gin, the waiter always has an answer, one that will no doubt be passed around the tiny room as a culture of sharing cocktails from other tables is encouraged and accepted with open arms. At the end of the night the cocktails are so damn good you forget what's in them remembering simply the colours, it's like a veritable sweet shop for cocktail lovers.

Getting good slots is hard, and with just cause. This makes cocktails fun again, it makes boring menus redundant...and it makes the morning after a real challenge. A worthwhile price to pay.
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Patty and Bun
54 James St, London W1U 1EU
Here at GLP we know the importance of a fine burger. We like many, are on that quest to find the holy grail: the perfect burger. But even we'll admit its getting harder to find the places that really stand out. Patty and Bun presented us with yet another opportunity to sample the city's finest, but what we were confronted with was far better.

Joe runs P&B, but he does more than run it, he makes it sizzle. Joe won't tell you what the specials are, he'll make sure you know how every burger is made, what every burger is made from, how long every burger is cooked for - in his own incredible and unique way. Joe talks about his 6 burgers (plus specials) like they were siblings. More importantly he'll re-affirm to you that every burger is "absolutely banging". It doesn't matter if they are, we've already sold into the ethos of this tiny, piece of wooden diner style heaven in Marylebone. He'll even tell you the story behind his near miss with HBO around the naming of his 'Ari Gold' burger. Ask him.

Everything about this place is magnificently unassuming and DIY. From the cardboard box signs to the MDF walls. No matter, its charm and vibe are what makes it. Music that keeps your head bobbing at all times. If you don't know your way around the near perfect rum punch, Patty & Bun will soon put paid to that. It's also worth mentioning that the chicken wings are so good, so deliciously good, that the sauce vs beard battle had only one winner. This writer's beard will be coming off in order to sample those wings again without fear of perceived vagrancy.

As we left Q-Tip 'Vibrant Thing' played through and Joe ran after us trying to tell us another story. Par for the course at this burger bar that sets itself apart from the rest. Oh, and the burgers are fricking awesome. Banging you could say.
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White Rabbit Cocktail Club
125 Stoke Newington Church St, London N16 0UH
The White Rabbit hit me with a sucker punch. I only meant to pop in for one. Somewhere between the fourth and fifth I remembered this as I basked in the warm, red, eccentric strangeness of it all. By then it didn't seem to matter.

There was a lady in a turtleneck behind us playing music that ranged from Oompa band R&B to what sounded like the boss level of Super Mario. My eyes were struggling to pin down a discernible theme to the eccentric decor. I was drinking the White Rabbit Ice Tea, or was it a ginger daiquiri, delivered through busy throngs by Clockwork Orange waitresses. I wandered into a garden with miniature Victorian street lights and felt like a GIANT. A delicious pizza appeared, seemingly made by the talented neighbours at Il Bacio Express (90 Church Street).

So, to demystify, White Rabbit is a cocktail bar & night club (cocktail club!) in Stoke Newington. It has 2 floors: the ground holds the cocktail bar and downstairs is the basement club: Down The Rabbit Hole. There's usually something going on down there, from life drawing to exhibitions to gigs to club nights. The garden's out the back, which you can't see from the street, which makes a lovely respite when the weather befits.

What's more you can hire the bar, basement or garden for a shindig with a difference. If you're looking to disappear for a few hours and come out feeling enlightened I thoroughly recommend a trip down the Rabbit Hole.
Quality Excellent
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Did you take any snow pics today?

London saw a thin layer of snow this morning — and there's possibly more on the way. We want to know whether the frosty weather has reached you, so share your photos or give a shout-out to your part of town!

#uksnow
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We've worked closely with some of the world's most exciting artists to create these new beautiful illustrations of London, just in time for festive giving. It's our little way to keep our service free because we'd never do anything rubbish like solicit paid listings. We'll make sure we get them to you in time for Christmas if you order in the next few days. Do your walls a favour and head to the GLP Megastore: http://store.greatlittleplace.com

Have you ever?

Artist: Ben Grib. Paper: Conqueror Oyster 250gsm stock. Size: A2.

GLP's London Bucket List. This 'Have you ever?' print features 38 things every Londoner should do before they escape the city and settle down in commuterville. Look closely for quirky little details and hidden surprises.

London's Decorative Border: 'There is in London all that life can afford'

Artist: Sam Dunn. Paper: Conqueror High White Wove 250gsm stock. Size: A3.

An ode to the Big Smoke, adorned by an illustrated border of all things iconic in London, from Mary Poppins and Big Ben to Peter Pan and the Queen's getaway mobile.

The London Dinner Table - Oscar Wilde quote

Artist: Risa Rodil. Paper: Conqueror High White Wove 250gsm stock. Size: A4.

Oscar Wilde had many a word to say about London but this is one of the classics.

Artist: Ranga Krishnamani. Paper: Conqueror High White Wove 250gsm stock. Size: A3.

Royal Albert Hall. One of the grandest stages in the world.

Tower Bridge. Our favourite bridge in all of London. A fortress of fine art. J'Thames.

Battersea Power Station. The beloved titan. An iconic beacon of strength and power.

Treasure map of great little places

Artist: Charlie Davis. Paper: Conqueror High White Wove 250gsm stock. Size options: A1 and A2.

This is the magnum opus. The chef d'oeuvre. A painstakingly illustrated map of London, filled up with some of our favourite great little places. The more you look at it, the more you'll discover. Just like London itself. Available in A1 too.

Typographical map of London

Artist: Joao Fonte. Paper: 320gsm Vanguard Cream stock. Size: A2.

A charmingly illustrated typographical map of London, filled up with iconic buildings and some of our favourite great little places. River variant available in blue, red and pink.
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Stories
30 Broadway Market, London, Greater London E8 4QZ
You know when you're stuck at home, and you have "that thing" you need to finish? And you keep putting it off? And you think maybe what you need is to go out somewhere and get J.K. Rowling on it because you'll DEFINITELY get it done if you have no other distractions and the peer pressure of other busy people looking productive? No? Ok, maybe that's just me. Well when that feeling strikes me again I'm going to Stories.

Stories is the new bar on Broadway Market from the people behind The Book Club and The Queen of Hoxton continues the "drinking and thinking" ethos of creative conviviality, with a thoroughly bursting calendar. During the day it's comfortable enough to camp out in, and there's space to tuck yourself away and get some work done or commandeer a long table for the kind of barnstorming mindshower where everyone wears different coloured hats and you blitz 5 packs of post it notes.

As well as the usual coffee and fine selection of loose leaf teas there's also a very solid brunching menu to stop you conking midway through the final page of that big presentation. And because we all know you're not reeeeally going to get any work done there's a daytime menu of juices and smoothies spiked with booze to help you start enjoying your new life as a loafer. As the evening arrives the place goes from light and airy to feeling a bit more low key and intimate and there's a well priced bar menu that offers simple and reassuringly homely dishes, with an emphasis on small bowls to share as well as some cracking burgers.

For me the best bit is the cocktail menu - it's like a choose your own adventure book... whether you want to get all swashbuckled on rum or cry your eyes out into a gin soaked hanky Stories has got you covered. The Love (Story) is all delicate raspberries and prosecco bubbles while I can only assume the Shaggy Dog (coffee liquor, tequila and fresh berries) leaves you stood at the bar for hours haranguing some poor soul with a load of long winded nonsense.

Whenever you might swing by there's bound to be a lot going on at Stories, from the in-house exhibitions of emerging artists projected onto the walls to the daytime and evening events in anything from dress making to origami. Show up, get inspired, leave drunk, wake up ashamed but altogether content.

The End.
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Dalla Terra
Saint Martins Courtyard, 25 Slingsby Pl, City of Westminster, WC2E 9AB
Unlike a great many place on the GLP site, Dalla Terra is a fairly unassuming looking establishment. In this case, not so very far from Covent Garden. It’s modern yet welcoming, part wine shop, part Italian restaurant; with bottles of fine plonk adorning the walls any wallpaper here would be entirely redundant.

But what makes this unusual contemporary enoteca truly great is that to indulge in a short sojourn through its wine list and small plate menu is to embark on a culinary off-the-beaten-track back-packing trip around the vineyards and farms of rural Italy.

If you’re lucky enough to catch owner Giuseppe Gullo, he’ll be your emphatic tour-guide through every mouthful and the restaurant’s “from the earth” concept. The simple rashers of chewy, flavourful culatello (posh prosciutto, to you and I) are even more satisfying knowing that they are imported from a remote monastery where the monks began a movement celebrating poetry, music, philosophy and, luckily for us, meat.

A deep and soulful glass of southern white goes down better in the knowledge that the grapes were plucked from a Puglia biodynamic vineyard owned and managed by three vivacious sisters. And, without wanting to get too M&Sish, this isn’t just any old buffalo mozzarella. Best enjoyed with a light prosseco (you know, like they do in Verona, darling), a firm rind gives way to an unctuous, salty centre. For those of you not paying attention…that’s a good thing.

But while the food is faultless, it is Dalla Terra’s love for imperfection that makes it perfect company for its GLP brethren. The sommelier’s reverence for so-called ‘defective’ wines from tiny independent Italian suppliers, matched with an ever-evolving seasonal menu, makes every visit to Dalla Terra a unique experience.
Food ExcellentDecor ExcellentService Excellent
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As part of Jon Reid's fantastic series 'A Year of London' (http://blog.nomadicvision.com/london/) - after years of taking photos of all kinds of far flung destinations, he's taking 52 weeks to shoot the gems in his own backyard - he went down to Gala Bingo's home in Tooting; the former Granada Cinema.

Gala Bingo in Tooting defines hidden gem - it's not the first place you'd think to find somewhere sprinkled with amongst the most stunning and surprising interior details you'll find anywhere in London. Built in 1931, the Granada Cinema opened with the film 'Monte Carlo' - and its popularity was such that 2,000 people got turned away that first night. The exterior is Cecil Massey designed Art Deco, with four imposing Corinthean pillars sitting above the foyer, but it's inside that things get big time impressive.

The celebrated Russian stage set designer of the time Theodore Komisarjevsky, with plasterwork by Clark and Fenn, set about creating a richly ornate Gothic interior, with marble foyers, a hall of mirrors, and intricate panels, accompanield by murals by Alex Johnson. And it's still here, looking amazing. Over the years, as well as showing movies, they fitted in the odd circus (with real elephants), wrestling and gigs from stars like good ol' Frank Sinatra, The Beatles and Jerry Lee Lewis.

By the 1970s the venue was on the wane, and it was slated for demolition. The local council stepped in with a preservation order, but it ceased showing films in 1973. Reopening as a bingo hall in 1976, it's been counting in the Legs Elevens ever since.

Here's what Jon found:
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We've built a magical new app for uncovering the greatest little places all over the world. From quirky bars to weird and wonderful restaurants. It's going to be your ultimate little black book of places. Come aboard to be part of something special: www.glpapp.com.
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On my arrival at 108 Chepstow Road I was faced with a brand new flower-riddled facade and modernised moniker to match. Like the blossoming buds of spring, the Wildflower Café is open, ready for business and looks splendid. Owner Leila Latif and chef Nico Rilla have transformed the West London space into an eminently charming café/bistro/florist or, depending on seasonal health nuances, a bloody nightmare for the hay fever afflicted. It's open for hot beverages, brunch and made-on-premises pastries by day, and always has its seasonal decorative bouquets for sale. We rolled up for supper, where the freshness of the food is equal to that of its fauna. A daily changing menu plays host to only a handful of dishes - always a good sign - and at least one option for our vegan friends per course. And, with the exception of a single edible flower on each plate, the food is free of gimmicks; this is just brilliantly put together cuisine. A potted shrimp starter is as sweet and welcoming as the staff (a compliment to both the seafood and our waiter), while the pan-roasted cod is the finest specimen on the menu. After all those occasions you've refused it at the chippy over the years for ethical reasons, you can surely allow yourself to embrace Wildflower's flaky-white offering this time. And yes, the leafy bed IS wild garlic – a sure-fire conqueror of the ubiquitous green leaf triad of spinach, rocket and watercress – and those ARE satisfyingly crunchy gnocchi, and that IS a Pernod-based fish stock sauce. Aces. Pork belly is Leila's recommendation; a fantastically fennel friendly (seeds on the top, braised bulb on the side) alternative to the usual crackle and fat combo to which we've become so accustomed. And a decent chocolate (70% no-less) brownie is a must-have to finish, if only for the accompanying dollop of cardamom cream. Wildflower Café's relaxing dining room is a bright and breezy place to spend time, and is sure to attract repeat custom like bees to pollen. But despite its equidistant vicinity to Ladbroke Grove and Westbourne Park, it might be a little too remote to attract the walk-in custom of those fancy diners of Notting Hill and slightly-less fancy diners of Portobello Road. So tell your friends to tell their friends to tell their friends to grasp the nettle and blooming well get down to the Wildflower.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
London's geographical Matthew McConaughey, Kings Cross is assuredly back and more on point than ever. And Grain Store has put in an exceedingly solid claim for best performance; an inventive restaurant and bar that fills up the bottom left corner of the hulking former granary warehouse that flanks Granary Square - next door to the also excellent Caraven King's Cross. Sauntering towards it (should you be a saunterer) will take you over Regent's Canal and into the square, which is a beautiful open space by day or night. With tables and chairs to accommodate the curiously bedecked folk from Central Saint Martins, which now occupies the majority of the building, the centrepiece of the square is an ever varying grid of lit up fountains. As a man who considers himself allergic to cringe, I'm quite happy to say they're rather magical. Grain Store comes from serious pedigree in the shape of the Zetter Group - behind the wonderful Zetter Townhouse and Bistrot Bruno Loubet over in Clerkenwell - and has brought with it all of their passion for creating beautiful spaces, and modern classic cooking from chef Bruno Loubet. The bar stands out in its own right too, with the menu being the brain child of London's premier molecular boozologist Tony Conigliaro - he of 69 Colebrooke Row fame. The interior is a vast yet cosy space, with all the trappings of the warehouse chic you might expect; bare brick walls, bits that look really old and 'raw' alongside gleaming brushed steel, copper and wood, dangling soft lighting and an impressive variety of glasswork, with a big and bright open kitchen showing the chefs at work. It's a remarkable setting. I'm not going to lie; the menu is bloody confusing (or I'm particularly dim). Hence this little tip off: the meat / fish / veg 'main bit' of each dish is at the end of the menu entry rather than the start. If this doesn't sound especially confusing, I take your critique - I can handle it. Once decoded, the food is not unlike the décor - inventive, attractively assembled, with classic bits and modern twists. Broadly it might be described as Modern European; but influences are from all over - the cranberry braised breef and smoked game sausage both turned it very well indeed. In summer the terrace outside will sit 80 - for a bit of central London alfresco that's hard to beat. For a nearby local (not unaffordably) slap up meal, or a trip to a different town, get the Grain Store on the list.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Britain is good at a lot of things. For example, consistently heavy rainfall or quiet tutting at queue jumpers but particularly, at celebrating. Any day given even the slightest encouragement can become a party in aid of something. That’s why although the Netherlands developed gin, (we applaud you) we had the foresight to say ‘Yes’ to unlicensed gin production in the 18th century, knowing that it would become a craze. After abandoning the idea it would cure Black Death or ruin mothers everywhere, we knew the humble G&T would be adopted as our drink of choice and in the year 2012, a lovely lady named Julia would decide to open ‘The London Gin Club’ at The Star at Night bar in Soho and create a ready made celebration spot to play to our strengths. God we are good. It is no coincidence that the club is ‘housed’ in premises that’s been in the family since 1933 and is the oldest family run establishment of its kind in Soho. You might know it as the Star Café (where incidentally the very first GLP team meeting was held), well it’s a wonderful tale of family ownership that turns it into the Star at Night. It goes a little something like this: “In 1933, my grandfather rented the building and it became The Star Cafe. It has remained in the family ever since, making us the oldest family run establishment of this kind in Soho. Until 10 years ago it just ran as a cafe, serving the local people of Soho for some 70 years or more. All of a sudden, one night in October it occurred to me what a wonderful bar it would make in the evenings and so, with a bit of chit-chat, negotiating and the like, it was agreed that 2 generations would run their businesses independently, together. And that’s what we do. The day time is still a bustling cafe and by night is transformed into a cocktail bar…we get on fine..they nick our gin, we nick their lemons!” You can feel the history of the place as you walk into the bar and see the old advertisement slogans hugging its walls; its relaxed vibe aided by its policy of table service. The passion of its owner is palpable though and its atmosphere is as refreshing and exciting as its gin based creations. With over 40 different gins and an extensive cocktail menu the option to get gloriously lost in the liquor is there for you, but do not fear, the kind folks at LGC have also launched a ‘Gin Jaunts’ tasting menu to help you on your quest to find your perfect match. The menu has 2 choices of 4 G&Ts twinned with specific herbs, fruits and flowers to enhance the flavour presented in spectacular balloon serve glasses. We adored the Bloom Gin cocktail garnished with an English strawberry whilst owner Julia’s favourite is No3 garnished with a Sicilian olive and lime peel. A glorious tapas menu that perfectly compliments your ‘jaunt’ also awaits … so my dear, why so sloe? What on earth are you waiting for? Make today a celebration and follow ‘The Star at Night’ to gin perfection, it’s what your ancestors would want you to do.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
A theatre without actors or comedians is simply an empty stage. A great little theatre is defined by its performances. So if you want to see big comedians, such as the likes of Michael McIntyre or Bill Bailey, perform in a shoebox-sized venue, plus the new rising stars of comedy and theatre, it’s worth paying the Leicester Square Theatre a visit. Right under the most touristy of noses, LST is a magnificently restored theatre that opened in 2008, located in the heart of the West End with two superb spaces running a delightful programme of comedy, cabaret, dance, music and theatre. The building, situated beneath the Notre Dame French Catholic Church, contains a main 400-seat auditorium with Oscar style seating and two bars as well as a more intimate 90-seat Lounge Theatre downstairs in the basement, with its own bar and cabaret-style seating.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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There’s more to tea than milk and two sugars. And a tiny little artisan tearoom right in the heart of Carnaby Street is out to prove just that. No PG tips or talking monkeys shall you find here. Anyone who’s ever tried their hand at the doom that is ‘shopping’ will know the value of a good nearby teashop. And Camellia’s Tea House is just the retail antidote. Vintage and mismatched décor are infused with shelves laden with tea jars, old-fashioned china and retro crockery. As it’s up on the second floor it doesn’t get flooded with people, but you will be lucky to get a seat. You’ll be even more in luck if you manage to perch yourself on the sun terrace, overlooking the shuffle and muffle of the picturesque Kingly Court below. You can buy teas here as well (over 120 of them so be sure to know the difference between your Oolong and your Souchong). The teas themselves are all blended by hand using their own original and unique tea recipes, as well as the quaint homemade packaging. It’s a real labour of love, just the sort of place we like. A GLP tip for you. Book a week in advance or earlier if you want to get Afternoon Tea booked in here. It’s popular stuff. Thanks for the tip off: Rochelle Kelsey Amber Masters.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
London’s no stranger to authentic tapas spots, but it’s not that many of them that take the Basque perspective and team it up with a load of old luggage – and hide an amazing squat-esque gallery for local artists up in their rafters. Seven is a new bar by Liam Brown and Jonny Rushton which aims to bring a bit of Bilbao to Brixton, and it will see your tapas and raise it to a pinxtos (tapas on a stick) and some damn good, and affordable, cocktails to wash it down while it’s at it. Set inside Brixton’s brilliantly eclectic Market, Seven at Brixton is certainly a place that aims to set itself apart. Look around and you’ll see some solid wooden tables, dangling lightbulbs, big old legs of Iberian ham and a menu to match. It is absolutely the product of owners Liam and Jonny; their travels not only around the London bar scene but also Spain itself are clearly visible and every last detail in the bar has been carefully considered. Suitcases as tributes to the space’s previous owner – a luggage salesman – can be seen now housing the spirits, and luggage tags as reservation signs are a handsome touch. The five rooms upstairs from the main bar have even turned Seven at Brixton into a functioning art gallery, with a sort of East London abandoned chic vibe, so when you’re done feasting on the gorgeous food, you can feast your eyes on the work of some up and coming local artists too. The guys take no commission on the work sold, and allow exhibitors to do so for free, they just want to see good stuff up there showing off local talent. Back downstairs, the menu is something of a triumph. If you’re the sort of person whose fresh gambas and chorizo isn’t complete unless accompanied by a good old sherbert lined martini glass – beholding pomegranate, marmalade and apple vodka – then you’re in luck. From the classics of bocadillos with hand-carved meats to their signature pintxos, and cocktails that cover everything from Bloody Marys to their own Electric Avenue (for recipe see above), Seven at Brixton has it sorted. If we really wanted to ham it up (jokes) we’d say that Seven at Brixton is an eclectic cocktail in itself. Take one solid measure of sharing platters, add a splash of authentic Latino beer and wine, sprinkle with a merry atmosphere and a twist of artistry, then serve right in the heart of a bustling market. Maravilloso. (Beware though, due to the location in the market, it has to close at 10, so get down there early – but it is open in the day).
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Something's happening on Hackney Road and we’re not talking about the the guy on one rollerskate. Leading the charge is the charming Mr Buckley’s restaurant. Situated opposite the Columbia Road exit, the neon insignia peeks beyond the textile shops that flank the exterior of this Hackney great little place. Named after a rather annoyed fellar who in 1883, after being refused entry to the then gentlemen's club, returned to set the place on fire. Now 130 years on Philip Way and his team are doing their utmost to set ablaze 277 Hackney Road in more productive, and legal, ways. With over a decade up their sleeves of building and running the forefathers of the Shoreditch bar scene, the team behind Mr Buckley’s have brought the best of their experience to Hackney Road. Going against the meat feasts and fast street food zeitgeist, Mr Buckley’s is serving up small plates of sensory overloading damn-good tasting food; from breakfast and dinner to weekend brunch, they’re doing it all differently and doing it well. It's foodie food, but not fussy foodie, it’s inventive, there to be discovered, devoured and most of all shared. We visited for dinner, with small plates reasonably priced and portioned; the lobster mac and cheese was a coral tower of sheer delight, polenta blue cheese and wild mushrooms a texture laden new found love and if desserts are your thing, there's no way you should leave with out the chocolate chilli moose, frozen caramel chunks and chocolate crumb. Yep you read that right, frozen caramel chunks? A necessary interrobang if ever there were one. Styling's stripped back with vintage touches - plywood décor, 1950s ship lights and stacking chairs means and not a stuffed animal in sight. The focus is on creativity and detail coming from the kitchen, not the wall hangings (except for a Pure Evil number on the stairs, a one off by the artist as he’s such a big fan). The bar downstairs is set for long dinners, cocktails and good music with friends not sticky floors, sugary drinks sweaty walls as basement bars in Hackney have been known to have. Open until 2am, much like the food Mr Buckley's cocktail list has been crafted for quality and taste with a twist, the 277's sloe gin, lemon and prosecco cuts a decadent sip and the Bloody Madison - a bacon based take on the hungover staple is a brunch favourite.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago