Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Grant Henninger
275 followers
275 followers
About
Grant's posts

Post has attachment
Worst news I've read in a long time. Google is shutting down Reader on July 1st. I spend more time looking at Google Reader than all other websites combined. I really don't know how I'm going to consume the internet without it. (And how am I ever going to get through all of my starred items before then?) Does anybody have any suggestions for other good web-based RSS readers?

Post has attachment
Interesting article on the use of coworking within large organizations. 

Post has attachment
This is the most ingenious cabinet latch I've ever seen. 

Post has attachment
Spending my day taking a first aid course. Been needing to do this for the past couple years, good to get done while I have the time. 

Post has attachment
Read these lessons, understand them, and then apply them. They apply not only to high risk endeavours, but to all aspects of life. 

Post has attachment
Here is a great interview about drones and drone warfare. Some great questions about super-empowered individuals from Jon Stewart. He touches on ideas that have been around for awhile if you've been reading people like +John Robb, but it's great to see it reach a more mainstream audience. It was also great to hear Missy Cummings talk about the use of drones to deliver packages, something John has been talking about more 

Post has attachment
Great article that covers the basics of US drone strikes abroad. What it doesn't cover is the logical conclusions drawn from such precedent.

When Sputnik overflow the United States for the first time, President Eisenhower didn't object to the legalities of it. Up until that point, sovereign air space started at the ground and proceeded to infinity. From a legal standpoint, Sputnik violated American air space, its overflight could have been considered an act of war.

Instead of declaring war, Eisenhower realized that I'd he allowed Sputnik to fly over the United States then the Soviets would have to do the same for the US. He understood the precedent it would set and knew the potential for the military applications of space, especially spy satellites.

Unfortunately, Presidents Bush and Obama don't seem to have the same grasp of the precedent they've now set. What is to stop a foreign government from flying a drone over the United States to target someone who is a threat to their government? The only thing stopping them is the power of the United States and the fact that we have the ability to go to war over such an action. But that just means that might makes right.

With these drone strikes, we've broken down all of the legal barriers to making war. These drone strikes have the potential to undo all do the work done since Woodrow Wilson to create an international legal framework to secure peace. These drone strikes have made us less secure and less able to deal with the threat of terrorism posed by actors in other countries. In the end, these drone strikes are making large numbers of people strongly anti-American.

We need to work towards building a legal framework to reign in multinational terrorist organizations, not destroy those legal frameworks while making more people increasingly turn against us. 

Post has shared content
Wayne Hale's recollection of the Columbia disaster is a truly wonderful read for any space nerd. In fact, there are so many valuable lessons to be taken from these posts that its a worthwhile read for anybody working with complex systems or in large organizations. 

Post has attachment
Have we learned nothing about selling military hardware abroad? How many M-16s have been used against American troops? How'd those Iranian F-14s work out for us?

Post has attachment
This is the best article I've read on the death of Aaron Swartz yet. In it, it uses Aaron's death to illuminate the depressing corruption that blankets our society.

"As we think about what happened to Aaron, we need to recognize that it was not just prosecutorial overreach that killed him. That’s too easy, because that implies it’s one bad apple. We know that’s not true. What killed him was corruption. Corruption isn’t just people profiting from betraying the public interest. It’s also people being punished for upholding the public interest. In our institutions of power, when you do the right thing and challenge abusive power, you end up destroying a job prospect, an economic opportunity, a political or social connection, or an opportunity for media. Or if you are truly dangerous and brilliantly subversive, as Aaron was, you are bankrupted and destroyed. There’s a reason whistleblowers get fired. There’s a reason Bradley Manning is in jail. There’s a reason the only CIA official who has gone to jail for torture is the person – John Kiriako - who told the world it was going on. There’s a reason those who destroyed the financial system “dine at the White House”, as Lawrence Lessig put it. There’s a reason former Senator Russ Feingold is a college professor whereas former Senator Chris Dodd is now a multi-millionaire. There’s a reason DOJ officials do not go after bankers who illegally foreclose, and then get jobs as partners in white collar criminal defense. There’s a reason no one has been held accountable for decisions leading to the financial crisis, or the war in Iraq. This reason is the modern ethic in American society that defines success as climbing up the ladder, consequences be damned. Corrupt self-interest, when it goes systemwide, demands that it protect rentiers from people like Aaron, that it intimidate, co-opt, humiliate, fire, destroy, and/or bankrupt those who stand for justice."
Wait while more posts are being loaded