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Gordon Haff
Works at Red Hat Software
Attended MIT, Dartmouth, Cornell
Lives in Lancaster, MA
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Jen Krieger is an Agile Coach on Project Atomic at Red Hat. In this podcast, she discusses soft skills, such as communication, that help software teams work better together and reduce unnecessary conflict. She also talks about how software development, especially in open source environments, is increasingly physically distributed and shares some tips for making remote teams work more effectively together.
This blog comments on a variety of technology news, trends, and products and how they connect. I'm in Red Hat's cloud product strategy group in my day job although I cover a broader set of topics here. This is a personal blog; the opinions are mine alone.
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Not that it's in the cards near-term, but I'd really hate to see Netflix' DVD rental business go away given that the only real alternatives now are: 1. Purchase (expensive for a film you don't plan to rewatch) and 2. Redbox (only good for current films) and 3. Streaming rental (still a patchy catalog). Unfortunately, even if Netflix doesn't plan to discontinue the service, it's evident that they've cut back on their inventory.
Instead of ignoring its DVD-by-mail operation that was dwindling but still bringing in hundreds of millions of dollars in profits every year, the company concentrated on efficiency.
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There are so many interesting architectural details on older New York buildings--especially Art Deco. 
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"I'm in an interesting place in my career, and it's an interesting time in Silicon Valley. I grew up in Silicon Valley, but it's something I've been reporting about since 1977, which is this Moore's Law acceleration. Over the last five years, another layer has been added to the Moore's Law discussion, with Kurzweil and people like him arguing that we're on the brink of self-aware machines. Just recently, Gates and Musk and Hawking have all been saying that this is an existential threat to humankind. I simply don't see it. If you begin to pick it apart, their argument and the fundamental argument of Silicon Valley, it's all about this exponential acceleration that comes out of the semiconductor industry. I suddenly discovered it was over. "  
This can't be the end of human evolution. We have to go someplace else. It's quite remarkable. It's moved people off of personal computers. Microsoft's business, while it's a huge monopoly, has stopped growing. There was this platform change. I'm fascinated to see what the next platform is going ...
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I think I agree on this. On the one hand it's fine to argue that Microsoft must must must have a play in mobile but, if that play inevitably has to consist of just yet another couple of charges into the Android and iOS machine guns (to use another mixed war metaphor), it's hard to recommend it. Microsoft should perhaps not be where they are today but, well, they are.

Ref: the consumer biz. I continue to observe that Microsoft stores like the one in the Pru are pretty sad. Not much like your typical Apple store. Perhaps Microsoft can reverse but for however many copies of Windows and Office they sell to consumers, there sure doesn't seem to be much passion around Windows products there.
In late June, CEO Satya Nadella emailed Microsoft's staff with an announcement that was part updated mission statement and part warning shot. In it, Nadella articulated his vision for Microsoft, wh...
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My containers and microservices talk from DevOps Summit in NYC last week.
This blog comments on a variety of technology news, trends, and products and how they connect. I'm in Red Hat's cloud product strategy group in my day job although I cover a broader set of topics here. This is a personal blog; the opinions are mine alone.
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+Daniel Dumitriu I think there are a number of reasons why containers are suddenly "the thing" now. A big one is that we've moved (at least for new-style workloads) to relatively homogeneous scale out infrastructures that match up well with containers. (Whereas VMs were more oriented toward heterogeneous OS environments as existed at the time.) Another reason is that we use "containers" as shorthand but it's really a whole ecosystem of package management, orchestration, etc. that has grown up as  part of (often open source-based) web-scale buildups.
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Gordon Haff

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In depth piece by Scott McCarty on understanding the differences between user space and kernel space in the context of containers.
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This is my writeup of a recent IDC DevOps study that Red Hat commissioned. 
DevOps early adopters say open source and PaaS are the key to fast cloud development
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Nice day for a walk in Central Park even if it was a bit warm. There are so many little statues and nooks and crannies that I still run into things I haven't seen before like this Husky monument. 
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My faith in humanity requires me to believe that the bit about "free range lobster" is a joke as opposed to a cynical attempt to fleece dumb tourists. 
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Didn't know that. But those aren't Maine lobsters; they're rock lobsters.
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Anecdotally, there does seem to be a general increase in interest around podcasting. I do listen a fair bit. (But mostly in the car; if I didn't drive much I probably wouldn't.)
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As usual, Adrian Cockcroft has smart things to say in this interview. The whole thing is worth reading but this comment on the pace of change particularly struck me for a couple of reasons.
This blog comments on a variety of technology news, trends, and products and how they connect. I'm in Red Hat's cloud product strategy group in my day job although I cover a broader set of topics here. This is a personal blog; the opinions are mine alone.
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Have him in circles
625 people
James Kirkland's profile photo
Laura Hamlyn's profile photo
inventive w's profile photo
Rod Leisher's profile photo
Marc Tamsky's profile photo
Datamation.com's profile photo
Shahin Khan's profile photo
Vera Celina's profile photo
oscar Hernandez's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Marketing
Employment
  • Red Hat Software
    Cloud Evangelist, 2010 - present
  • Illuminata, Inc.
    IT Advisor, 2001 - 2010
  • Data General
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Currently
Lancaster, MA
Previously
Paoli, PA - New Orleans, Westboro (MA), Lancaster (MA)
Story
Tagline
Cloud strategy at Red Hat
Introduction
I'm in the cloud product strategy group at Red Hat. Prior to Red Hat, I wrote hundreds of research notes, was frequently quoted in publications like The New York Times on a wide range of IT topics, and advised clients on product and marketing strategies. Earlier in my career, I was responsible for bringing a wide range of computer systems, from minicomputers to large UNIX servers, to market while at Data General. Among other hobbies, I do a lot of photography and enjoy the outdoors.
Education
  • MIT, Dartmouth, Cornell
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