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Gopakumar Sethuraman
Lives in Alexandria
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Gopakumar Sethuraman

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Gopakumar Sethuraman

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You don’t need a rocket to leave Earth. There’s a slower, gentler trip in the works—and it comes with a cocktail.
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"The ancient art of mathematics, Tao has discovered, does not reward speed so much as patience, cunning and, perhaps most surprising of all, the sort of gift for collaboration and improvisation that characterizes the best jazz musicians. Tao now believes that his younger self, the prodigy who wowed the math world, wasn’t truly doing math at all. ‘‘It’s as if your only experience with music were practicing scales or learning music theory,’’ he said, looking into light pouring from his window. ‘‘I didn’t learn the deeper meaning of the subject until much later.’’" 
A prodigy grows up to become one of the greatest mathematicians in the world.
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"In some extreme cases, the stress can make the heart weaken and bulge, creating a condition called takotsubo cardiomyopathy or “broken heart syndrome,” which can sometimes lead to death."
When the love of your life dumps you, you’re going to go a little nuts. But it’s a very specific form of crazy: There are actually conflicting neural systems active inside your brain. It’s like you’re falling in love all over again, only in reverse. Here’s how neuroscience explains it.
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"You learn to write from reading books, and living your life, and investigating the inside of your own head. Next, you learn how to write comics by pulling them apart and studying their innards to see how they work. This is how you end up as a 24/7 comics writer and also a terrifying shut-in who will eventually go nuts in a very public way and conclude your career as a figure in a newspaper photo captioned FOREST CREATURE SUBDUED BY POLICE TASERS. But I'm serious. You are going to learn how to do this – learn your own way to manage the difference in pacing between eight pages and twenty-two pages and one hundred and twenty pages, learn how to achieve effects in timing and drama and emotional nuance, learn when to talk and when to shut up – by studying the best comics you can find, and tearing them apart and seeing how they do things and then stealing the tools you can use and adapting them into your own style. You are going to want to read broadly. Make yourself read things you wouldn't ordinarily look at. If superheroes are your favourite, then make yourself read Carla Speed McNeil or Dan Clowes or Marjane Satrapi. If you only read science fiction comics, then force yourself to look at Hugo Pratt and Eddie Campbell and Svetlana Chmakova.

Growing up, my favourite comics writer was Alan Moore. But I learned just as much, if not more, from studying Eddie Campbell, Philippe Druillet, Bryan Talbot, Glenn Dakin, Carol Swain, Will Eisner and a hundred other people.

Read comics. All comics. And then cut them open to steal their power." 

—Warren Ellis
http://nwsltr.me/newrecs.html#archive?d=5555694ae4b03ddfa9161206&n=0
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“The question is, how does this current bubble end? Not when, but how? What constitutes a bubble? For me, I can clearly see we're in a bubble economy when relatively more money is chasing relatively few good ideas. When the conversation turns to Uber for "x," you can tell there we're out of ideas, that people are basically just trying to iterate and get lucky. I suppose some of them will be lucky. There was lots of good timing before the collapse of the last bubble, and so this bubble is and will continue to create billionaires. But something will cause a reset, and, for example, you can see this now with regard to new organizations such as The Battery Club.
There was a period when San Francisco first created these exclusive social clubs. There was the Bohemian Club and the Pacific Union Club, and they came into being at the turn of the last century, maybe a little bit before, but a time when there was a generation of great wealth. Now along comes the Battery Club. You can see on a Friday night at the Battery Club the Uber black cars lined up around the block. You can see it in the absurd real estate valuations that are transforming San Francisco. I believe the median cost of a one‑bedroom apartment is over $3000 right now, the median rental cost in the city is over $4000. Real estate prices have gone up pretty continuously since the mid-1990s. They've plateaued occasionally, but now it's amongst the most expensive places in the world to live.                                 
Looking out the windows from my office over south of Market, I can see nine construction cranes. What's being built are banks. This is this kind of wealth that emerges in the developed world now. It's happening in New York, it's happening in London, it's happening in San Francisco, where money that needs to flee from regions of the world that are financially insecure will come and basically invest in a condominium. There are these stacks of condominiums, and you drive past these buildings at night, and there are no lights on. The owners don't need to rent them through VRBO or AirBnB, they just leave them empty. It deforms the city. The capital flows in, in many ways. I can't tell you how many times I've said signs of a bubble top, because you see something that's obviously irrational.                                   
The transportation situation in Silicon Valley is quite amazing right now. You have this crumbling public infrastructure, and now the Internet has made it possible to essentially skim the cream. That's what we're seeing right now. It's now clear to me that the Internet enabled private transportation services that are springing up, ranging from Uber and Lift and SideCar to these premium bus services like LEAP in San Francisco, which will take you in a small bus with Wi-Fi and a fancy seat from the marina to downtown.                                 
There are other systems that are appearing around the country, in places like Boston and Washington. There's a company called Bridj, which has basically a small bus-style transportation system that routes itself based on people calling in. So it's not Uber getting just you, it's a bus that changes its route based on who's calling in. It's kind of an efficient transportation system.                                 
I worry that we'll have two classes of transportation: We'll have the elites, who'll drive in Uber blacks, and we'll have the poor, who wait longer and longer for the public buses that never come because the public system has basically become even more underfunded than it already was. That's still working itself out.”
This can't be the end of human evolution. We have to go someplace else. It's quite remarkable. It's moved people off of personal computers. Microsoft's business, while it's a huge monopoly, has stopped growing. There was this platform change. I'm fascinated to see what the next platform is going ...
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A ~3 billion mile romance. Talk about a long distance relationship. Sad Pluto by BennuBird: http://j.mp/1fKHjNa
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Have him in circles
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Gopakumar Sethuraman

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A battle for the future of Islam is taking place between reformers and reactionaries around the globe, and its outcome matters. The United States needs to start helping the right side win.
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In case you missed it, we extended the BAHFest submission deadline. We need more proposals! Especially if you're in Seattle or San Francisco, please consider submitting one. We have some good ones so far, but we're hoping to get a couple more! Discuss this comic in the forum. July 23, 2015 ...
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"The nature of politics is to subtract meaning from language, Swaim understands, but he develops a relatively benign philosophy about political speech: “Using vague, slippery or just meaningless language is not the same as lying: it’s not intended to deceive so much as to preserve options, buy time, distance oneself from others, or just to sound like you’re saying something instead of nothing.” And politicians resort to such devices not out of deviousness but simply because every day they must weigh in “on things of which they have little or no reliable knowledge or about which they just don’t care.”"
Barton Swaim's "The Speechwriter," on his years working for South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford, is destined to be a classic of political communication.
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The impressive engineering behind those stunning new Pluto photos
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"The scientific method, for Dawkins, is not merely essential to understanding the physical world; it can be deployed to help answer moral questions as well. “Human society, human love, human hate, art, music, poetry – these are all things which are the products of human brains, and brains are the products of ultimately scientifically explicable phenomena. But not in practice explicable, because it’s too difficult, it’s too complicated.” There is still room in Dawkins’s worldview for mystery – about the nature of human consciousness, for example – but that mystery is neither supernatural nor ultimately inexplicable."
The long read: The scientist and bestselling writer has become the face of a new crusading atheism. But even his closest allies worry that his online provocations do more harm than good
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Have him in circles
63 people
Niloy Bhattacharyya's profile photo
BBC World Service's profile photo
Meera Sethuraman's profile photo
Fahad Ajnan's profile photo
Phoebe David's profile photo
Kirstie Bennett's profile photo
LLION JONES's profile photo
Madhu R V's profile photo
Wenyang Li's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Alexandria
Previously
Palakkad - Muscat - Richmond
Story
Tagline
The Ayatollah of Awesomeness. The Caliph of Coolness. The Sultan of Salaciousness.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Gopakumar Sethuraman's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
A whiff from hell
www.economist.com

IT SMELLS like raw sewage mixed with putrefying cow’s carcass, and it might soon be Israel’s latest high-tech export. Skunk, as it is apposi

America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
www.newyorker.com

Millions of people get tests, drugs, and operations that won’t make them better, may cause harm, and cost billions.

Seize the day
www.economist.com

MOST of the time, economic policymaking is about tinkering at the edges. Politicians argue furiously about modest changes to taxes or spendi

Pointers to the future
www.economist.com

PROGNOSTICATORS have a bad record when it comes to new technologies. Safety razors were supposed to produce a clean-shaven future. Cars were

'In 1976 I discovered Ebola, now I fear an unimaginable tragedy'
www.theguardian.com

Peter Piot was a researcher at a lab in Antwerp when a pilot brought him a blood sample from a Belgian nun who had fallen mysteriously ill i

Why India Went to Mars
www.newyorker.com

Beyond prestige, the Indian space program is looking for publicity for its for-profit satellite business.

The Cardinal Sin of Software Engineering
www.theeffectiveengineer.com

A few weeks ago, a young startup engineer reached out to me for advice. Her CEO had given her team 4 weeks to rewrite the web product from s

The myths (and realities) of synthetic bioweapons
thebulletin.org

The dominant narrative permeating scientific and policy discussions on the security threat posed by synthetic biology can be summarized in f

The Fasinatng … Frustrating … Fascinating History of Autocorrect | Gadge...
www.wired.com

David Sparshott Invoke the word autocorrect and most people will think immediately of its hiccups—the sort of hysterical, impossible errors

Oh! You pretty things
www.economist.com

GÖRLITZER PARK, a patch of grass and concrete, has a seedy air. Its tall walls are covered in graffiti. Near the entrances, young African me

The incorporated woman
www.economist.com

FACEBOOK, Amazon, Twitter and a host of other big companies in today’s “data-driven economy” share one thing in common: they make a living f

Jill Lepore: What the Theory of “Disruptive Innovation” Gets Wrong
www.newyorker.com

Clayton Christensen’s theory of “disruptive innovation” is founded on anxiety, fear, and shaky evidence.

What surprising discoveries come from the exabytes of data from electron...
online.wsj.com

The rise of electronic health records helps researchers aid doctors in making a better diagnosis.

The white tourist’s burden | Al Jazeera America
america.aljazeera.com

Growing Western demand for altruistic vacations is feeding the white-savior industrial complex

Why the Smart Reading Device of the Future May Be … Paper | Science | WIRED
www.wired.com

Why do traditional paper books remain so popular, especially for deep, immersive reading? Are some people simply too stubborn and nostalgic

Lizzie Widdicombe: Could Soylent Replace Food?
www.newyorker.com

Soylent, a synthetic food product, is made from raw chemical components; its formula accounts for all the major food groups. Rob Rhinehart,

Annals of Hollywood: Comedy First
www.newyorker.com

Online version of the weekly magazine, with current articles, cartoons, blogs, audio, video, slide shows, an archive of articles and abstrac

George Packer: Is Amazon Bad for Books?
www.newyorker.com

To many book professionals, Amazon is a ruthless predator; recently, the company has even started publishing books. A monopoly is dangerous

I Hope You Enjoy This Artisanal Knuckle Sandwich.
www.mcsweeneys.net

I thought we were friends. I thought that our mutual love of Wes Anderson films and This American Life meant something. Apparently not. Inst

DYNAMITE!
tamineilson.bandcamp.com

Audiences across the globe have heard and been enchanted by the golden voice of Tami Neilson. Singing her heart out across endless roads and