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Google Take Action
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Stand together to shape the future of the Internet!
Stand together to shape the future of the Internet!

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+Google launched a full overhaul of the Transparency Report today. It features clearer data visualizations, more context for the data, a Recent Updates section so you can see what’s new, and a better way to download data from the most popular reports. Enjoy exploring!
We are proud and excited to announce our new and improved Transparency Report, the result of several years of work by many Googlers passionate about the report’s mission and Google’s dedication to transparency. Visit https://transparencyreport.google.com to explore! We’ve overhauled the entire report to make it more user friendly with clearer charts, more information about our data, and a unified design that is easier to navigate so that visitors can quickly find the information they seek. Check out the blog post from Google's Michee Smith for the backstory.

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New data available in the Transparency Report!
We have updated our Transparency Report with data on requests for user information for the second half of 2016. From July to December 2016, we received a total of 45,550 requests for user data, affecting a total of 74,074 users/accounts. Read more about this data and our perspective on international frameworks for disclosing user information in a blog post from SVP Kent Walker.

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A very belated Happy New Year! We've been quiet for a while but our 2017 resolution is to make sure you hear from us more often this year. So we'll try to share more things—like this awesome news from Cloudflare and EFF—on a more regular basis.

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New data on the Transparency Report today!
Data on government requests for user information for the first half of 2016 has just been published to Google's Transparency Report. Globally, Google received 44,943 government requests for information regarding 76,713 accounts during the first half of 2016. We provided user information in response to 64% of those requests, which remains unchanged from the previous reporting period (i.e. the second half of 2015). In addition, pursuant to the USA Freedom Act, the FBI lifted a gag restriction on an NSL issued in the second half of 2015. To reflect this, we have updated the range of NSLs received in that period—July to December 2015—from 0-499 to 1-499.

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Check out the shiny new version of our Search copyright Transparency Report!
After 4 years, our Transparency Report for copyright removals from Search was looking a bit rusty. So, we gave it an overhaul. We're excited to share a new, more user-friendly version of our copyright Transparency Report, launched earlier this week. We’ve added examples of copyright removal requests as well as carousels explaining notice and takedown processes.

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+Google Transparency Report recently published updated the government requests to remove content section with removals data for the second half of 2015. From July to December 2015, the top three products for which governments requested removals were YouTube, Web Search, and Blogger. Visit the Transparency Report to explore!

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Google's Transparency Report has been updated for the 2nd half of 2015. Read more!
We have updated the Transparency Report with data on government requests for user information for the second half of 2015 (July through December). Learn more about the progress on surveillance reform in the US on our US public policy blog.

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From the UN Human Rights Council's non-binding resolution: "...the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online, in particular freedom of expression, which is applicable regardless of frontiers and through any media of one’s choice, in accordance with articles 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights..." 👏

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This week, Google signed onto a letter with over 45 companies and groups opposing proposed changes to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure. The changes would give judges across the US new authority to issue warrants for hacking and surveillance of computers whose locations are unknown—including where those computers are victims of a botnet. We've been outspoken in our opposition to changes like this in the past (see our blog post here https://publicpolicy.googleblog.com/…/a-small-rule-change-t…), as we believe this expanded authority could have severe, unintended consequences.

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