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Filipino social enterprise: ‘when there’s coffee served, there’s less fighting’.

Filipino social enterprise Coffee for Peace is mediating disputes in the Philippines’ most conflicted region by harnessing the power of coffee as a communication tool.

There’s nothing that can’t be solved over a good old cup of coffee. This is the firm belief of Joji Pantoja, founder of Coffee for Peace, a Filipino social enterprise using steaming-hot brews to encourage warring communities in the conflict-ridden southern island of Mindanao – rocked by decades of violent separatist insurgencies – to put down their arms in the name of peace and reconciliation.

As a peace advocate, Pantoja realised the symbolic power of coffee when encouraging dialogue between the separatist rebel group Moro Islamic Liberation Front and government forces over the military’s disputed crossing of a designated peace line.

See more - http://bit.ly/2MvGNXn
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Mini Stitches are sewing up unemployment with The Big Issue Shop.

The children’s clothing brand is giving Bangladeshi women in East London a hand up.

Pantaloons, playsuits and ra ra skirts – these might not be the first words which come to mind when the subject of women’s empowerment arises, but think again.

Innovative children’s clothing brand Mini Stitches are showing how to use business to nurture a diverse community, all while dealing in soft stripes and geometric prints.

The East London social enterprise empowers disadvantaged women in the area by providing employment, training and English classes. Each Mini Stitches item is unisex and produced largely by Bangladeshi women from Tower Hamlets in East London, with up to 75 per cent unemployment in their community.

See more - http://bit.ly/2vKRUSG
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Cruelty-free giant Lush opens vegan pop-up coffee shop.

The shop will highlight the issue of single-use plastic waste.

Cruelty-free giant Lush will open a vegan coffee shop in London in a bid to highlight plastic waste.

The store, #carrythecup, will be launched in collaboration with Change Please – a social enterprise staffed by the homeless. Located at the Lush Soho Studio on Beak Street, it will open from August 14 for four weeks.

Free coffee, iced coffee or tea will be offered to anyone that comes in with a reusable cup. In addition, the #carrythecup coffee shop walls will ‘host an array of educational facts and positive actions people can take away and incorporate into their lives to make an impact and reduce waste‘.

See more - http://bit.ly/2P3DYLt
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This charity is using a drone to find rural rough sleepers.

P3’s Lincolnshire Street Outreach Team will bring the tech to Lincolnshire skies from this week.

Rough sleeping is not just a problem limited to urban areas, in fact rural homelessness can be even harder to spot.

Of the estimated 6,270 households classed as homeless in the countryside by The Institute for Public Policy Research, many are living in outhouses, tents and other makeshift shelters.

That makes people difficult to spot over large distances for outreach teams looking to provide help and connect them with the service they need.

Charity P3 have turned to technology to combat this problem with a £600 drone.

The Phantom 3 drone uses a 20mm camera to live-stream footage of rural Lincolnshire back to outreach teams letting them comb remote and coastal areas across the region more effectively.

Team members can then be directed towards people via the quickest and safest route.

See more - http://bit.ly/2njmrlS
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The Prologue.

Manchester-based social enterprise, The Prologue, is set to gift all children and schools in the UK free personalised stories in an altruistic attempt to drastically improve literacy.

Written by Luke Swann, the award-winning educationalist, published children’s author and director of The Prologue, ‘The Secret Book of I‘ is the first personalised story to be offered for free, the first to be used as an educational tool and the first to tackle lack of diversity in children’s literature. The story is available to all children, teachers and parents online as a free e-book; or to purchase as a paperback, which includes a ‘Donate a Book’ initiative where any individual can purchase a physical copy for children who have faced harsh difficulties, meaning they can cherish their own magical book for life. The Prologue will be the first to donate these books, via partnered children’s charities, before it is then open to the public to give.

Since it’s initiation in 2017, The Prologue has won two UnLtd awards, in addition to one from The Business Group, with its director also being shortlisted for the Great British Entrepreneur Award of the Year 2017 for Innovation and the BQ Emerging Entrepreneur of The Year Award for 2017. The Prologue’s most recent grant of £5000 enables them to avoid charging parents and schools for their empowering personalised stories that they hope will inspire a generation.

See more - http://bit.ly/2M5KTFd
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Refugee Open Ware: Teaching tech in conflict zones.

In a world more and more dehumanised by warfare and violence, it is simply moving to see how the other plate of the scale is yet full of people ready to heal every single wound that weapons and hatred have left open.

And while technology is frequently a symptom of the crisis of war-affected areas, in the hands of such people it can also become a respite from pain. This is the case of Refugee Open Ware (ROW), an organisation that teaches displaced humans how to take advantage of technology in order to digitally fabricate the things they need.

Out of the current world population, amounting to 7.6 billion, around 1.5 billion live in conflict areas. The instability of these regions often prevents essential materials and supplies from reaching citizens constantly threatened by war. This is where Refugee Open Ware intervenes. With a wide range of cutting edge technology, this mission of activists, corporations, academic institutions and nongovernmental organisations serving in some of the most-exposed-to-conflict areas of the world provides the tools, skills and training that locals need to face the challenges war constantly sets against them.

See more - http://bit.ly/2vaelQQ
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Don’t let it go to waste.

Regeneration and healthy eating in Berwick.

“At the end of the day I wanted the town to have the ownership of it. I didn’t want it to be something I had done, I wanted it to be something ‘we’ had done”, says 25 year old Millie Stanford, “I wanted to build up some sort of momentum for change in the town”.

Millie is the co-founder of Northern Soul Kitchen, a food waste initiative and pay-as-you feel cafe in the heart of Berwick-upon-Tweed. The project, which recently opened its doors on is based in a previously abandoned shop.

Using unsold food from the local Tesco’s and other small local shops in Berwick they aim to create healthy food in a welcoming environment. Customers pay whatever they think the food is worth, making it accessible for those who might otherwise not be able to afford it. You can even volunteer your time and skills to pay for a meal.

The idea originally was for a single food-waste pop up at Berwick’s 2015 Christmas market. But they soon started thinking bigger. After two years of pop-ups and small events support from UnLtd allowed them to put down permanent roots.

See more - http://bit.ly/2vrHupQ
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Goldfinger Factory is whittling out futures with The Big Issue Shop.

The award-winning London social enterprise brings woodworking skills to the local community.

Goldfinger Factory is an award-winning and sustain design company with a bit of a difference.

Despite a name that my suggest a Bond villain-esque approach, the Big Issue Invest-backed social enterprise promises to “empower communities to turn waste into gold”.

To do that, they give one of London’s most underprivileged wards the skills to follow in their footsteps through the fabrication of furniture and interiors.

A team of 19 artisans work on the ground floor of Erno Goldfinger’s iconic grade-II listed Trellick Tower to skilfully craft high-class for John Lewis, Cisco and London Fashion Week among others.

But that is not the full story – with their base also offering a showroom, community café with a woodworking workshop and teaching academy.

See more - http://bit.ly/2NC7nep
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Rag’n’Bone Man gives back to community with short film.

Rag’n’Bone Man has teamed up with AudioActive and Red Bull Media for a new short film showcasing their work in supporting budding musicians from rough backgrounds.

Rag’n’Bone Man is giving back to the community that helped launch his career.

The ‘Human‘ hitmaker has teamed up with social enterprise AudioActive – of which he is a patron – and Red Bull for a short documentary showing how the organisation helps mentor young budding musicians to become influences on the next generation of teenagers.

He commented: “AudioActive are doing something to ensure that regardless of wealth or background, young people get a chance to be creative. I can’t support that enough. Big love.”

In the film, the soul star discusses how music has the power to affect positive change, whilst looking at how AudioActive’s Room To Rant project gives young men a creative and informal outlet to “get stuff off their chests” through rap, lyric writing and spoken word.

See more - http://bit.ly/2LlTIKJ
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Toiletries Amnesty is getting home comforts to those without them.

Karen Harvey’s project provides an online database to allow people to donate unused smellies across the country.

For some of the least fortunate in the country, from homeless shelters to care homes, even something as simple as having soap, shampoo or other smellies is still a luxury.

Karen Harvey is trying to fix that with a project called Toiletries Amnesty, encouraging people to root around in packed cupboards or taking complimentary items from hotel stays and repurposing them to help those without access to any.

The idea for the plan came four years ago when Karen investigated her own bathroom cupboards and found them full of smellies that she was never going to use.

See more - http://bit.ly/2uJZKKN
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