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Giorgio Bertini
Worked at United Nations
Lived in Italy, UK, Mexico, Brasil & Chile
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Giorgio Bertini

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The spontaneous organization of collective activities in animal groups and societies has attracted a considerable amount of attention over the last decade. This kind of coordination often permits group-living species to achieve collective tasks that are far beyond single individuals’ capabilities. In particular, a key benefit lies in the integration of partial knowledge of the environment at the collective level. In this contribution, we discuss various self-organization phenomena in animal swarms and human crowds from the point of view of information exchange among individuals. In particular, we provide a general description of collective dynamics across species and introduce a classification of these dynamics not only with respect to the way information is transferred among individuals but also with regard to the knowledge processing at the collective level. Finally, we highlight the fact that the individual’s ability to learn from past experiences can have a feedback effect on the collective dynamics, as experienced with the development of behavioral conventions in pedestrian crowds.
The discussion of various cases highlighted that individuals exchange information by means of direct or indirect interactions. This local exchange of information is then integrated at the collective level by means of feedback loops to produce adapted collective responses to various kinds of problems. Swarms and crowds consequently manage to take advantage of their numbers to cope with their complex environment and achieve sorting tasks, optimize their activities, or reach consensual decisions. Furthermore, through learning processes, individuals can develop behavioral specificities that may have additional effects on the collective dynamics. In human societies, for example, the emergence of behavioral conventions can induce a common behavioral bias in the population that enhances in turn the self-organized dynamics.
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Giorgio Bertini

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Cognitive and psychological research provides useful theoretical perspectives for understanding what is happening inside the mind of an individual in tasks such as memory recall, judgment and decision making, and problem solving – including meta-cognitive tasks, when an individual is reflecting on their own or other people’s performance. Understanding these processes within individuals can help us understand under what conditions collective intelligence might form for a group and how we might optimize that group’s collective performance. Each of these components alone, or in concert, can be understood to form the basic building blocks of group collective intelligence.  In this chapter, we will review the cognitive and psychological research related to collective intelligence. We will begin by exploring how cognitive biases can affect collective behavior, both in individuals and in groups. Next, we will discuss the issue of expertise, and discuss how more knowledgeable individuals may behave differently, and how they can be identified. We will also review some recent research on consensus-based models and meta-cognitive models such as the Bayesian truth serum that identify knowledgeable individuals in the absence of any ground truth. We will then look at how information sharing between individuals affects the collective performance, and review a number of studies that manipulate how that information is shared. Finally, we will look at collective intelligence within a single mind.
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Giorgio Bertini

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Increasing the number of options can paradoxically lead to worse decisions, a phenomenon known as cognitive overload. This happens when an individual decision-maker attempts to digest information exceeding its processing capacity. Highly integrated groups, such as social insect colonies, make consensus decisions that combine the efforts of many members, suggesting that these groups can overcome individual limitations. Cognitive overload is a growing issue for human decision-making, as unprecedented access to data poses new challenges to individual processing abilities. Human groups also solve difficult problems better when each group member has only limited access to information. It has long been recognized that collective choice can improve accuracy by averaging out the random errors of inaccurate individual decisions. The advantage we find here is different: rather than combining many essentially identical choices, colonies truly distribute their decision-making. No worker must carry out the full task of assessing and comparing all options, allowing the colony as a whole to process more information, more effectively.
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Giorgio Bertini

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Beyond the potential effects of tracking, children from wealthy families seem to benefit from many variables outside the classroom, including enriching home environments, safe neighborhoods, good childcare, after-school activities, and the education level of their parents. Highly educated parents in these towns seem to have a “heightened focus” on education, Reardon said, and they are increasingly willing to spend resources to ensure that their children are academically successful. While less-educated parents certainly want their own children to do well, they tend to have less disposable income. Because white parents are more likely than parents of color to be highly educated and to earn more, white children are more likely than their peers of color to have access to enriching educational experiences outside of the classroom.
Black and Latino students in economically prosperous cities are grade levels behind their white peers.
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Giorgio Bertini

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An eight-year-long accrual and analysis of the whole genome sequences of healthy elderly people, or "Wellderly," has revealed a higher-than-normal presence of genetic variants offering protection from cognitive decline, researchers from the Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) reported today in the journal Cell. The initial findings from the Wellderly Study suggest a possible link between long-term cognitive health and protection from chronic diseases, including cancer, heart disease and diabetes, which account for 90 percent of all deaths in the United States and other industrialized nations and more than 75 percent of health care costs.
An eight-year-long accrual and analysis of the whole genome sequences of healthy elderly people, or "Wellderly," has revealed a higher-than-normal presence of genetic variants offering protection from cognitive decline, researchers from the Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) reported today in the journal Cell.
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Giorgio Bertini

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Educar é dar sentido. É dar sentido ao nosso estar no mundo. Nossos corpos precisam desse sentido para se realizar plenamente. Mas também nossos corpos são vazios de imagens e elas precisam fazer parte da nossa mente para possamos dar respostas ao que se nos apresenta diuturnamente como desafios da existência. É por isso que não basta dar alimento apenas ao corpo, é preciso também alimentar a alma, o espírito. Sem comida o corpo enfraquece e sem sentido é a alma que se entrega ao vazio da existência.
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Educar é dar sentido. É dar sentido ao nosso estar no mundo. Nossos corpos precisam desse sentido para se realizar plenamente.
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A prominent theory of aging holds that decaying of mitochondria is a key driver of aging. While it's not clear why our mitochondria fade as we age, evidence suggests that it leads to everything from heart failure to neurodegeneration
Whenever I see my 10-year-old daughter brimming over with so much energy that she jumps up in the middle of supper to run around the table, I think to myself, “those young mitochondria.” Mitochondria are our cells’ energy dynamos.
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Giorgio Bertini

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Researchers are one step closer to understanding the genetic and biological basis of diseases like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and rheumatoid arthritis - and identifying new drug targets and therapies - thanks to work by three computational biology research teams from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt University.
Researchers are one step closer to understanding the genetic and biological basis of diseases like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and rheumatoid arthritis - and identifying new drug targets and therapies - thanks to work by three computational biology research teams from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt University.
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Giorgio Bertini

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Analyses of ancient DNA from prehistoric humans paint a picture of dramatic population change in Europe from 45,000 to 7,000 years ago, according to a new study led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator David Reich at Harvard Medical School.
Analyses of ancient DNA from prehistoric humans paint a picture of dramatic population change in Europe from 45,000 to 7,000 years ago, according to a new study led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator David Reich at Harvard Medical School.
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Occupation
Director at Learning Change Project.
Skills
Research, teaching, coaching, course & research design, project design & management
Employment
  • United Nations
    International Consultant, 1986 - 2010
  • Universities
    Research Fellow at: Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza" (Italia); University of Cambridge (UK); Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) (México); and, Universidad de Chile (Chile), 1984 - 2010
  • Learning Change Project
    Founder & Director, 2005 - present
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Male
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Other names
Francesco
Story
Tagline
Learning Change Project - https://www.facebook.com/learningchangeproject/
Introduction
Research on society, culture, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, complexity, systems, networks, swarms, socio-ecology, sustainability, futures ++
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Italy, UK, Mexico, Brasil & Chile - Brasilia Brasil - Mexico Mexico - Roma Italia - Cambridge UK - Brighton, UK - Santiago Chile - Lucca Italy