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Giorgio Basile
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Luck is truly where preparation meets opportunity. (Randy Pausch)
Luck is truly where preparation meets opportunity. (Randy Pausch)

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Get on the same page with Tone

Sometimes in the course of exploring new ideas, we'll stumble upon a technology application that gets us excited. Tone is an experimental Chrome extension that makes sharing digital things with nearby people as easy as talking to them. 

Tone broadcasts the URL of the current tab to any machine within earshot that also has the extension installed. We’ve found it useful for quickly sharing documents with everyone in a meeting, contributing relevant links without interrupting conversations, and maybe even the occasional rickroll (https://goo.gl/smp6ig). 

To get started, first install the Tone extension for Chrome (http://g.co/tone). Then simply open a tab with the URL you want to share, make sure your volume is on, and press the Tone button. Your machine will then emit a short sequence of beeps. Nearby machines receive a clickable notification that will open the same tab. Getting everyone on the same page has never been so easy! Learn more at http://goo.gl/369hmn 

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A team of engineers in Singapore have developed this neural probe. When implanted in the brain, the small device gives amputees and disabled people a long-term solution that can directly communicate with their artificial limbs. http://bit.ly/1pzYQp0
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Sculpture: Politicians discussing global warming
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Can a circle and a square have the exact same area? Thanks to our friend pi, the answer is more complicated than you’d think. http://intel.ly/1cGdcn5 #Pi
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The power button symbol found on every computer has a history steeped in code. The symbol is actually a 1 imposed over a 0, with 1 representing the "on" position in binary and 0 representing "off."
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Happy Monday everyone! (via Engineer Memes) #Mondaymemes
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Where Do You Think The Internet Is? Here's something you might not be aware of the internet and world wide web.

We all use it in our everyday life but not many people consider to think about where the internet actually is.

Did you know that over 550k miles of underwater cable has been laid out across the globe to let you access the world wide web? Take a look at this infographic to find more interesting facts about the internet: http://www.mervikhaums.com/infographics/what-you-dont-know-about-the-internet

Infographic source: Who Is Hosting This.com

#whereisinternet #internetinfographic  
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A brief history of the Internet, and what the future may hold

Yesterday marked the 44th anniversary of the first message sent on the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET), the progenitor to what we know as the Internet. At 10:30 pm on 29 October 1969, a student programmer at UCLA, where Computer Science Professor Leonard Kleinrock (http://goo.gl/oZJcZ) had established a Network Measurement Center, used a SDS Sigma 7                                   (http://goo.gl/KNM8wu) to send a message to the Stanford Research Institute's SDS 940.  

From Wikipedia (http://goo.gl/9Z7CgU):
The message text was the word “login”; the “l” and the “o” letters were transmitted, but the system then crashed. Hence, the literal first message over the ARPANET was “lo”. About an hour later, having recovered from the crash, the SDS Sigma 7 computer effected a full “login”.

Initially consisting of only 4 Interface Message Processors (IMPs), the ARPANET grew to 13 by the end of 1970, and to 213 host computers 12 years later in 1981. As a graduate student at UCLA, Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist +vint cerf contributed to a host-to-host communications protocol for the ARPANET, later co-developing the TCP/IP suite (http://goo.gl/GCj1F3) with Robert Khan                              (http://goo.gl/atwQAM) while at Stanford University in the mid 1970’s.  

Today, Cerf continues to help shape the technology and impact of the Internet by identifying technologies that support the development of Internet-based products and services. On November 19th, Cerf will deliver the keynote at the Federal Trade Commission’s Internet of Things Workshop (http://goo.gl/LT0PrX), a workshop focused on the “opportunities and challenges for consumers related to the growing number of Internet-connected devices that touch their lives”. 

Free and open to the public, the workshop serves as a forum for academics, industry professionals, and consumer advocacy groups to explore issues surrounding the increasing prevalence of everyday devices that communicate with the internet, and each other.
The Internet has progressed enormously, from sending a single “login” message between two computers 44 years ago, to today’s system of interconnected networks that serves billions of people. 

We are interested in hearing what your predictions are for the next  44 years of the Internet, in the comments below!
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