Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Gideon Rosenblatt
51,502 followers -
Grounding Machines in Humanity
Grounding Machines in Humanity

51,502 followers
About
Posts

Post is pinned.Post has attachment
Mapping the Meaning of Sentences - in the Brain

This research at Carnegie Mellon has fundamentally changed my understanding of how conceptual meaning is represented in the human brain.

I reached out to talk with lead scientist, Marcel Just. Here's how he describes the importance of the research:

“We’re getting at the basic building blocks of human thought... We’re finding out what those pieces are, what types of pieces they are, and to some extent how they go together.”

Over the course of the interview, he shared insights into the limitations of the current approach, how they did it, how it maps to other approaches to conceptual mapping, potential applications in psychiatric diagnosis and education, and how critical a role emotion plays in meaning-making.

This is important research. And yes, though there plenty of challenges and different understandings of what it actually means, it really does demonstrate a viable path to mind reading.

#meaning #semantic #brain
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"I don’t want anyone to use our tools to undermine democracy," Zuckerberg said.

"At least, not next time..." he is rumored to have muttered quietly to himself.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Metcalf, along with researchers from six other institutions, has recently formed a group called Pervade to try to mend the system. This summer, they received a three million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation, and over the next four years, Pervade wants to put together a clearer ethical process for big data research that both universities and companies could use. “Our goal is to figure out, what regulations are actually helpful?” he says. But before then, we’ll be relying on the kindness—and foresight—of strangers.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I've seen these arguments many times, but it's a good reminder that technology always exists within an organizational context. In this case, it is Facebook.


Algorithms can be gorgeous expressions of logical thinking, not to mention a source of ease and wonder. They can track down copies of obscure 19th-century tomes in a few milliseconds; they put us in touch with long-lost elementary school friends; they enable retailers to deliver packages to our doors in a flash. Very soon, they will guide self-driving cars and pinpoint cancers growing in our innards. But to do all these things, algorithms are constantly taking our measure. They make decisions about us and on our behalf. The problem is that when we outsource thinking to machines, we are really outsourcing thinking to the organisations that run the machines.
...

Facebook would never put it this way, but algorithms are meant to erode free will, to relieve humans of the burden of choosing, to nudge them in the right direction. Algorithms fuel a sense of omnipotence, the condescending belief that our behaviour can be altered, without our even being aware of the hand guiding us, in a superior direction. That’s always been a danger of the engineering mindset, as it moves beyond its roots in building inanimate stuff and begins to design a more perfect social world. We are the screws and rivets in the grand design.

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Increasing Returns to AI

Artificial intelligence pioneer, Yoshua Bengio:

"AI is a technology that naturally lends itself to a winner take all," Bengio said. "The country and company that dominates the technology will gain more power with time. More data and a larger customer base gives you an advantage that is hard to dislodge. Scientists want to go to the best places. The company with the best research labs will attract the best talent. It becomes a concentration of wealth and power."

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
One Pedal Driving

To get the maximum benefit out of driving an electric car, the accelerator (you can’t call it a gas pedal anymore!) controls both the speeding up and slowing down. Pressing the pedal makes the car go, as usual, but lifting your foot makes the car slow down, hard, not coast.

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
How Does Deep Learning Work?

A new theory seeks to explain the success of Deep Learning by highlighting generalization as a kind of algorithmic 'forgetting.'

As an example, some photos of dogs might have houses in the background, while others don’t. As a network cycles through these training photos, it might “forget” the correlation between houses and dogs in some photos as other photos counteract it. It’s this forgetting of specifics, Tishby and Shwartz-Ziv argue, that enables the system to form general concepts. Indeed, their experiments revealed that deep neural networks ramp up their generalization performance during the compression phase, becoming better at labeling test data.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
+John Hagel​ and crew prove the future of which for individuals, organizations and policy makers.

I thought this part on cultivating passion particular interesting:

...we identified the one common element as participants having a very specific form of passion—something that we call the “passion of the explorer.” This form of passion has three components: a long-term commitment to making an increasing impact in a domain, a questing disposition that actively seeks out new challenges, and a connecting disposition that seeks to find others who can help them get to a better answer faster.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Turning Healthcare into Political Performance

We are now in the horrible position of having new proposed health care legislation being pushed through in clandestine legislative tactics, aimed to obscure and hide just how bad it would be if were it to take effect. The sad thing is that this is happening so quickly that there is some chance it could actually pass, which is mind-blowingly dumb. Political theater overshadowing actual governance responsibilities on a whole new level.

You can see in the link below what Jimmy Kimmel had to say about it, but right now if you live in a state where you're not sure where your senators stand on this issue, I recommend you call and signal a loud and resounding "no" on this stupidity. Millions of people's continued health depends on it.

Here is a resource to simplify the process:
http://thesixtyfive.org/home
The Anger of Jimmy Kimmel and Why YOU should be ANGRY TOO!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Your Living Room: aka the Augmented Reality Showroom

Over on Twitter today, people are plopping chairs and couches all over train stations, zoos, streets, and um yes, living rooms. All thanks to Ikea using Apple's ARKit to develop an AR shopping app.

Now, Ikea claims the 3-D furniture in Ikea Place shows up at scale with 98 percent accuracy, with true-to-life representations of the texture, fabric, lighting, and shadows. In testing the app, that held up: Digital sofas and chairs sprang to life realistically next to permanent, physical objects. Valdsgaard says much of that technological improvement comes from ARKit. Rather than using 2-D camera overlays, the app takes data from your phone's camera sensors to map digital objects in a room. Apple calls this "world tracking," and it helps keep a digital sofa from skittering around the room like a balloon. The furniture items also load faster than they did in the previous iteration, and don't require any calibration on the part of the user.


Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded