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GeoCosmic REX
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When Earth and Space Collide
When Earth and Space Collide

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“What happens is: if you look at the history of science, what you see is that there is always a new revolutionary idea that comes along and it usually takes between one and two generations for it to become accepted. Then once it becomes accepted, it becomes dogma and anything that doesn’t quite fit in with it is now a new revolutionary idea. So what you’ve got, is you’ve got the mainstream textbook explanations, and then you always have this body of anomalous data that doesn’t fit in, and then you go twenty or thirty or forty or fifty years in the future, and now that anomalous data has somehow been assimilated, and either into the existing framework or the existing framework has been modified – or in some cases abandoned altogether to allow for the new data – but by the time the new data has been incorporated, now there is NEW data that has come along. So see there is always this body of data that precedes the theoretical framework." Randall W. Carlson in August, 2003
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"...when they come in and they create sonic booms – they can create multiple sonic booms. So oftentimes, people will be in their house and they’ll start hearing this succession of booms and then they’ll run outdoors and then they’ll see something like this in the sky. And frequently the descriptions are that when the thing passes overhead it appears as if the sky opens up. Like in some cases, people have described it like it’s a scroll opening up, and once it passes, the scroll rolls closed again. Or somebody described it almost like the sky got unzipped and then it got zipped back up again. And when you go and you read the ancient accounts, they’re so striking what these people are describing – in like, for example, in the apocalyptic literature. And it sure, to me, becomes obvious that we’re talking about the same thing here." (Randall W. Carlson on Jan. 30, 2008)
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First segment available for free here on YouTube! All three segments now posted on our Vimeo site (YouTube stopped offering PPV system) for a rental or purchase fee so that you can support our work... Many thanks, and don't miss a class!
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"...when you get to the scale of objects that are a hundred to a hundred and fifty feet in diameter, which is again equivalent to the Tunguska in Siberia and the Barringer meteor impactor in Arizona – what you then have is the stony objects like the Tunguska object are gonna be in the range of ten times more abundant than the iron objects. So what that means is that for every one object, just statistically speaking and using the term stochastic – which in scientific literature means just coming at random intervals – for every one object that would come and hit the Earth and leave a distinct crater as a signature that this event happened, there would be ten events like Tunguska that don’t leave this obvious impact scar that within a hundred or a couple of hundred years, all traces of the event has essentially been [erased]. You see? That’s the main significance of the Tunguska event." Randall W. Carlson on Jan. 2, 2008
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" ...the planet, obviously, is a whole lot more robust than we had imagined. I mean, if we’re talking 5000 years ago, an object moving at twenty miles per-second slammed into the Indian Ocean and created tsunamis 600-800 feet high and gouged a hole twelve miles wide in the floor of the ocean – I mean do you realize what kind of damage that’s going to do to the global environment? Now, what I’m trying to get at is that one event like that… By comparison: try to imagine how much damage would be effected to the global environment by an all-out nuclear war? If we blasted everything we had, China blasted out everything it had, India, Russia decided to shoot off every nuclear weapon we had - that would still pale in comparison to even a small cosmic event. We're talking right now maybe 5-6000 megatons in the total global nuclear arsenal. One small event the size of a kilometer would be hundreds of times more forceful than that. Now can you imagine? Is there anything that we have done yet that has even remotely approached an all-out nuclear war in its consequences to the environment? No, there isn't - nothing! Now, what I'm getting at is, an all-out nuclear war pales almost into insignificance compared to one of these [impact] events!" Randall W. Carlson on Nov. 28, 2007
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“Well, until I learned about that, I was always assuming that the Noachite flood account had its roots back in the Ice Age, that massive flooding that occurred at the end of the Ice Age, when sea level came up 400 feet. Now I believe, following Plato and the Egyptian priests that talked to Solon that there had been multiple floods, and the flood of Noah and Deucalion was only the most recent of floods. … If you’ve got 600-foot tidal waves moving out from that crater, they’re certainly gonna go all the way to the northern end of the Indian Ocean, and they’re gonna move right up the Persian Gulf. Now, all the evidence suggests that Noah’s Flood, based upon the flood layers excavated by Sir Leonard Wooley, shows that some massive wave came from the south. Now, most of the critics of his assumption that that represented the Noachite flood said that “well, what this represented was a regional flood because it’s certainly not global in extent” which is true but it is perhaps evidence that a very large flood wave moved up the Persian Gulf and swept up perhaps as far as Armenia. And what we’re seeing when we see the rise of the Sumerian civilization, what we’re seeing there is the date given, the rise for the Sumerian civilization, shows up between three and five hundred years after the Burckle crater event. So it’s almost like, human history – what we’re perhaps seeing there is the re-booting of human history in the aftermath of that particular event.” Randall W. Carlson on Nov. 28, 2007
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"Now, where are we now? That gets to be the paramount question in this whole thing, and as I’ve been trying to present the evidence in here – we have not warranted taking our own future stability for granted. And that’s why I have constantly expressed my… somewhat of my dismay at the current fears over global warming, because from what I have been studying in that last couple of decades, would suggest to me that the human input is miniscule compared to the cosmic input – just miniscule almost to the point where it fades into nothing next to the cosmic inputs that we know have happened over and over again. And that’s what I want to keep emphasizing here. Also the fact that science has demonstrated that plausibility, at the same time we get this ancient legacy of myths and tradition which is basically telling us the same damn thing – just using different language to tell us exactly the same story!" Randall W. Carlson on Nov. 28, 2007
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“It has set the moon to rocking, and it still is, and it’ll continue to rock for another 10,000 years… This is just by a stroke of sheer luck that it was the moon and not the Earth. Now how many times do objects like that zip by space? That we’re only now just beginning to comprehend. However, when you begin to read the ancient literature and the oral tales, and the rituals and ceremonies that have come down to us – then you begin to appreciate the fact that this was a much bigger concern to ancient people than it has been to modern people.”
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“This is what we're doin'; this is the thing were trying to get out to people. And when I went on Joe Rogan... with Graham Hancock, that podcast that we did talking about this stuff, was the most watched podcast in the nation [JRE #872] and that tells me something right there – that people are ripe. And I challenge people, I say look: I don’t care if you say I’m bullshitting, but if you say I’m bullshitting – then back it up! Disprove what I’m saying – go out there and talk to scientists like I have done, and read their papers, and go out in the field and show me where I’m wrong. Show me where!”
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