Profile

Cover photo
GenealogyBank - Genealogy Website
2,356 followers|2,100,842 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

 
This 1860 Obituary Tells a Gripping Story

Read the story on the GenealogyBank blog: http://bit.ly/28Vwbye

On 6 May 1815 Captain James Reilly – with Archibald Robbins part of his crew –  sailed “from Saybrook, Conn., for the Cape de Verde Islands.” As Robbins’ obituary reports, they didn’t make it.
1
Add a comment...
 
Using Obituaries for Genealogy: FAQ

Read the story on the GenealogyBank blog: http://bit.ly/28Ssadp

In this blog article, Gena Philibert-Ortega answers some of the frequently-asked questions about how to use obituaries in genealogy research.
2
Add a comment...
 
Every Obituary Tells a Story

Read the story on the GenealogyBank blog: http://bit.ly/28NmYrz

Every obituary gives us more information about our relatives and often the details and clues we need to better understand their lives and where they lived.
1
Add a comment...
 
Washington Archives: 95 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Read the story (and see a complete title list) on the GenealogyBank blog: http://bit.ly/28PjAJn

If you are researching your ancestry from Washington, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online WA newspaper archives: 95 titles to help you search your family history in the “Evergreen State,” providing coverage from 1854 to Today. There are more than 68 million articles and records in our online Washington newspaper archives!
1
Add a comment...
 
I Didn’t Know Marilyn Guedesse – but, She’s My Cousin

Read the story on the GenealogyBank blog: http://bit.ly/28IBJrv

Marilyn Guedesse was born in Minot, North Dakota, 31 March 1933 and died in Hamilton, Illinois, 20 December 2015. I never met her, her husband, parents or descendants – but when I read her obituary I knew she was my cousin. How?
1
Add a comment...
 
Father’s Day Celebrations from the Past

Read the story on the GenealogyBank blog: http://bit.ly/1rtpbwm

In this blog article, Gena Philibert-Ortega searches old newspapers to learn about how our ancestors celebrated Father’s Day.
1
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
2,356 people
Mary Ann Kelley's profile photo
Elisabeth Kenney's profile photo
Jean-Yves BAXTER's profile photo
Bin Zhang's profile photo
Miguel Vasques's profile photo
John Palmieri's profile photo
Ani Cole's profile photo
Stitch and Frog's profile photo
Patricia Johnston's profile photo
 
Military Records in Newspapers: How They Help Make Your Genealogy Complete
 
Certainly none of us likes war. It tears families apart, causes untold destruction, and all too often results in the loss of life or severe injury. However, there is one benefit to us as genealogists – and that is the fact that military service, notes, casualty lists, etc., were often reported in historical newspapers. As a result, those military records are available to help us fill gaps in our family history, providing many excellent details about our ancestors. Read more: http://bit.ly/28Q1aah

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 22 February 1945, page 11
1
Add a comment...
 
History of American Mail: Letters of Our Ancestors & Newspapers
 
A look at the history of American mail shows how the mail system and newspapers have been closely connected – with the postal system delivering newspapers, and newspapers doing the work of the post office by alerting readers to unclaimed mail. These “uncollected mail” lists in old newspapers are a valuable genealogy resource for family history researchers. Read more: http://bit.ly/28N9Can
 
Newport Mercury (Newport, Rhode Island), 15 July 1765, page 3
1
Add a comment...
 
Memorable Epitaphs: Rita Hayworth
 
Rita Hayworth (1918-1987) was an American actress and dancer who appeared in 61 films. Enormously popular during the 1940s, Hayworth was the favorite pin-up girl for American soldiers during WWII.

Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California:
www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=1253
 
Read more interesting, curious or funny epitaphs of famous and not-so-famous people: http://bit.ly/LjTUaW
 
Rita Hayworth’s epitaph:
3
Add a comment...
 
Thrilling Movie Debut: ‘Jaws’ Is Released
 
On this day in 1975, a young Steven Spielberg unleased his move “Jaws” on the world. Just as the summer season was heating up and crowds were flocking to the beach, Spielberg’s frightening story of a huge great white shark that attacked humans changed how people felt about swimming in the ocean.
 
“Jaws” was a staggering success, commercially and critically, and is now recognized as one of the greatest films in the history of cinema. Most critics praised the thriller upon its release, such as this review Fran Weil wrote for the Boston Herald.
 
Calling the movie “a slick, powerfully scary, jump-out-of-your-seat and gnaw-at-your-knuckles fish tale,” Weil told his readers: “Under the impeccable direction of Steven Spielberg, ‘Jaws” is a taut adventure-packed thriller, fast-paced and terrifying, full of breath-bating suspense and adrenaline-pumping tension.”
 
Did you see “Jaws” upon its release in 1975? Tell us how the movie affected you in the comments section.

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 21 June 1975, page 4
1
Add a comment...
 
Genealogy Tips for Researching Letters in Newspapers
 
Newspapers have a long history of publishing letters. Many of us are familiar, thanks to the movie National Treasure, with the “Mrs. Silence Dogood” letters that were actually penned by 16-year-old Benjamin Franklin. These 14 letters, published in his brother James’s newspaper New-England Courant during 1722, allowed the young Franklin to fulfill his dream of having his writing published.
 
For some people, letters published in the newspaper are the only opportunity they have to be a “published” author. Correspondence is an important – yet often overlooked – resource for genealogy research.
 
When you think of letters, think outside of the proverbial envelope. Yes, letters are often a home source or housed in archival collections. But remember that letters have long been published in the newspaper. Letters found in the newspaper can be an important addition to your family’s story. Read more: http://bit.ly/1rtEbua

New-England Courant (Boston, Massachusetts), 13 August 1722, page 1
2
Helen Lutke's profile photo
 
Thans Ben.
 ·  Translate
Add a comment...
 
Our Ancestors’ Stories Live in Old Newspaper Ads Too
 
I like to look at every mention of each ancestor that I am researching – and that includes newspaper classified ads. While looking through the Newark Daily Advertiser for 1835 I was surprised to see this unusual paid advertisement. What is with this odd newspaper advertisement?
 
“This is to certify, that the bearer, Julia Moore…[is] perfectly honest, never having had the slightest cause for suspicion.”
 
Something must have been wrong if E. Allen felt compelled to take out an ad attesting to Julia Moore’s honesty. Read more: http://bit.ly/1UBz3f4
 
Newark Daily Advertiser (Newark, New Jersey), 3 July 1835, page 3
2
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
2,356 people
Mary Ann Kelley's profile photo
Elisabeth Kenney's profile photo
Jean-Yves BAXTER's profile photo
Bin Zhang's profile photo
Miguel Vasques's profile photo
John Palmieri's profile photo
Ani Cole's profile photo
Stitch and Frog's profile photo
Patricia Johnston's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
sales@genealogybank.com
Story
Tagline
Genealogy website housing over 1 billion genealogy records online to help you discover your family history.
Introduction
GenealogyBank is a genealogy website that is home to the largest online newspaper archive dedicated to family history research in the United States. 

With over one billion genealogy records in our vast online collection, our searchable database provides easy access to information on millions of American families from 1690–today. 

Search over 5,800 newspapers that provide first-hand accounts about your ancestors that simply can't be found at other genealogy websites. Visit GenealogyBank today and discover the story of your family's past like never before.