Shared publicly  - 
 
New Digital Archive Resurrects Classic Dungeons & Dragons Adventures

We all remember our first time. Perhaps your best friend taught you. Or, someone showed you at recess or in the library after school. Maybe it happened with a group of friends. Or, alone in your bedroom, you figured it out all by yourself.

No, no that. I'm talking about the first time you played Dungeons & Dragons.

For many of us, those early experiences of exploring dungeons, slaying monsters and devouring bowls of Cheetos are inextricably linked to specific gaming products and their charmingly amateurish artwork of animated skeletons, spider queens, and aqua-colored dungeon maps.

Who can forget B1: In Search of the Unknown? Included in the D&D Basic Set, this adventure introduced many gamers to D&D. Or Q1: Queen of the Demonweb Pits, the epic culmination of the seven-part adventure that began with the twin trilogies G1-3: Against the Giants and "Drow" series of modules D1-D3? Or, one of my personal favorites, the deadly Tomb of Horrors, whose endless traps and tricks and demi-lich Acererak killed nearly every adventuring party that tried to enter it?

Alas, many of those rulebooks and adventures from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s have disappeared -- forgotten, made obsolete, or discarded with the trash by parents when young gamers went off to college. (Thanks, Mom!). Only occasionally do these out-of-print products resurface at yard sales, online shopping sites, or at specialized auctions. If they can be located, they're often only available for exorbitant prices.

Now, they're been brought back to life. Like a cleric casting a resurrection spell, Wizards of the Coast, the maker of D&D, is waving its magic wand and raising these lost products from the dead.

http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2013/01/dndclassics/
16
5
Peter Ravn Thers's profile photoAl Everett's profile photoPatty Chang's profile photoGergely Polonkai's profile photo
 
Although it might be campy and dated, I hope that more people can enjoy it for what it is - groundbreaking interactive fiction that we still see the effect of. 
Add a comment...