Profile

Cover photo
Gavin Craig
Attended Michigan State University
305 followers|17,388 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
Using Xenoblade Chronicles as a launching pad to trace the edges of awe. http://killscreendaily.com/articles/universe-scale/
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
Come for the update on my Beyond Good & Evil playthrough with +Sara Clemens, stay for the shout-outs to physical digital media and making a wide release theatrical film out of a slide show presentation.
Dear Sara, I’m finding myself trying to recreate 2003 a bit as I’m playing BG&E, especially to make sense of its peculiar model of mass media. We’ve already touched on the fact that making the ...
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
On how the Crash Bandicoot commercials were better than the Crash Bandicoot games, and why we'll never have another Crash again.
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
"We’ve adopted the sandbox as the metaphor we use to describe big-budget open world games, but it’s just as apt to describe them as digital theme parks. For $60, they put us in the middle of an imaginary space where we can play a part in a story or just go for a ride but in which we are perpetually insulated from the impact of our activities and no matter what we choose to do we are never for an instant allowed to be bored."
There’s a bit of internal controversy, as Far Cry 4 gets started, over the name of the protagonist. First addressed, somewhat uncertainly, as “Mr. Ghale” (spelled with a silent H and rhyming with “fail”) on a recorded message by an American State Department official advising against travel in the small Himalayan nation of Kyrat, the young man is soon ...
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
I talked to Simogo's Simon Flesser about what what their new game The Sailor's Dream shares with Device 6 and Year Walk, and what it doesn't.
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
The history of witch trials is at the very least, shall we say, troubled, and Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney not only declines to take on that history, it actually forces the player to sit on the other side of the table.
There’s something gloriously weird that sometimes occurs when two media franchises combine for a crossover story. While the antagonism implied in the title of Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney might bring to mind blockbuster (and inconsistently successful) calamity films like Freddy vs. Jason or Alien vs. Predator, Capcom and Level-5’s buddy flick of a portable console ...
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
305 people
Tyler Dee's profile photo
Michael Abbott's profile photo
jazi tuemy's profile photo
Joe Carpenter's profile photo
Keshab Jayadev's profile photo
Muhamad Hasim's profile photo
Mimi Nguyen's profile photo
Joey Swed's profile photo
Martine Anciaux's profile photo

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
If it's something that would interest you, I've been doing informal Dragon Age "notes" for the past few weeks. The plan is to continue them through all three Dragon Age games. I expect it will take quite a while. The current note is about how Dog is the best companion, or you can scroll back to the beginning at https://medium.com/@craiggav
Notes on Dragon Age: Origins — #5: Companions are the best, except when they’re not
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
[W]hen the game gives close attention to Kirby and the objects around him it’s hard not to get caught up in the magnificence of the digital craftsmanship. Up close, in pre-rendered video, Kirby’s digital clay is almost tangible, right down to the waves of constantly shifting finger impressions that mark each of the thousands of tiny adjustments animators have to make to create the illusion of stop-motion life.

It’s almost a shame when the camera pulls back to give the player control. Except for the occasional visual flourish—such as the way Kirby flattens in high speed collisions and has to take a moment to unstick himself—Kirby’s clay form becomes almost a side note, an irrelevancy in a hardened, terra cotta world.
Like most Kirby games, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse is self-consciously modeled as an object of beauty. As one of the most purely abstract major videogame protagonists, Kirby is almost infinitely malleable. In his first games, this shape-shifting was reflected in Kirby’s interaction with the dangers of his world. Unlike Mario, who jumped on hostile creatures, Kirby inhaled his ...
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
There's donuts on Kill Screen today for Mardi Gras. From me! (Well, a talk with Ben Esposito, the creator of the upcoming Donut County, but it's still pretty sweet.)
Ben Esposito talks about erasure and delight in his upcoming game.
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
"If the hours upon hours of our extended narrative forms offer a maximalist portrayal of the glorious disorder of our social worlds, then a short story captures the inexplicable particularity of the minute-by-minute experience of inhabiting a single corner of that world. For me, at least, only short narrative can really convey the way that a sort of hopelessness mixed with bliss accompanies every meaningful personal relationship—the way we forge meaningful bonds not despite but because of the fact that we can never really completely reach another person. Something in the silence of a short story, the way every attempt at explanation must necessarily remain incomplete, functions as a necessary sort of candor, an acknowledgement of the limits of what can be encompassed and represented."

My short, earnest review of a brief, lovely game.
I have long adored short stories. There is a certain practicality to my admiration for the form—we each have, after all, only so much time and not a minute more, so I have nothing but gratitude for those who can set a scene quickly, accomplish the task at hand, and then depart without lingering. But there’s something else ...
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
In Spirits of Spring, its follow-up to Papo & Yo, Minority tries to build a bullying allegory that isn’t a bullying simulator. The result is powerful, but somehow not as particular as its predecessor.
There’s a bright shining line dividing Spirits of Spring. On one side, there’s a perfectly serviceable navigation and puzzle game with an outstanding score. (When you open the game it suggests that players don headphones, and I would second this recommendation. The sound design is subtle, but outstanding.) On the other side of the line is a game ...
1
Add a comment...

Gavin Craig

Shared publicly  - 
 
We all of us owe someone something: On Kentucky Route Zero Act III
Even for an episodic game, Kentucky Route Zero has had its own, peculiar sense of timing. Unhurried, seemingly without direction, but always apparently exactly where it needs to be whenever it finally gets there. The game’s third Act, quietly released last Tuesday, eleven long, silent months after Act II, somehow both provides long-awaited rewards for those of us who ...
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
305 people
Tyler Dee's profile photo
Michael Abbott's profile photo
jazi tuemy's profile photo
Joe Carpenter's profile photo
Keshab Jayadev's profile photo
Muhamad Hasim's profile photo
Mimi Nguyen's profile photo
Joey Swed's profile photo
Martine Anciaux's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Writer, Editor, dad
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Writer and critic. Games mostly.
Introduction
I'm interested in narrative, the interplay of fact and fiction, video games, food, Gertrude Stein, and Batman.

I've written for outlets including Kill Screen, Snarkmarket Bit CreatureThe Bygone Bureau, VideodameIdlermag.com and Comicosity. I've also contributed to New Liberal Arts. I co-edited the Revelator Press e-chapbook project.

You can find me as @craiggav on Twitter.
Education
  • Michigan State University